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NEWS
May 5, 2010
In reference to "Alonso wouldn't suspend bullies" (May 4), Baltimore schools CEO Andres Alonso should be reminded the classroom is no place to permit the presence of distracting bullying students at the expense of the other students being short-changed in their pursuit of a quality education. In my opinion, these disturbing bullies should definitely be withdrawn and placed in another facility where they are required to learn respect for others, self-discipline and a structured life along with an appropriate academic curriculum.
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NEWS
By Marc B. Terrill | September 22, 2014
Jews around the globe will gather in synagogues Wednesday to mark the start of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. There is a change in the air as fall approaches; schools are back in session, temperatures begin to drop and there is a general atmosphere of renewal. Jewish tradition encourages us to gather together, reflect on the year that has passed and pray for peace and sustenance in the coming year. The collective strength and spirit felt during this time of year typically energizes all to look ahead with optimism.
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NEWS
May 29, 2013
Back in the early 1960s, Americans had to learn a new level of tolerance. People of color would no longer take a back seat to anyone. In the late 1960s and '70s, we again had to learn tolerance as young folks let their hair grow and voiced opinions on national and international policy. We called them hippies. Now we are back in school again. Gay people are demanding their rights. So what are we to do? We could quit the Boy Scouts, the Lions Club, The Optimists Club, The Rotary Club, etc. No more public pools, libraries, churches, public schools and so on. But what good would come of all that?
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Sixteen female senators have sent a letter to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell requesting that the NFL adopt a zero-tolerance policy against domestic violence. Goodell recently instituted a policy with a six-game suspension for first-time domestic violence offenders and a lifetime ban with the possibility of reinstatement after a year for second offenses. The letter to Goodell, also sent to The Baltimore Sun, follows former Ravens running back Ray Rice being indefinitely suspended for his domestic violence incident, for which he was charged with felony aggravated assault.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
Amid all the glitzy advertisements vying to capture the motoring public's attention in the Baltimore area, the students who designed five billboards promoting tolerance hope their messages stand out. Students at Patapsco High School and Center for the Arts in Dundalk worked with graphic designers last fall on Design Ignites Change, a nationwide initiative to place student images and messages on billboards. The young artists created slogans, logos and drawings for the project. Five designs from Patapsco students were eventually made into billboards that went up this month in and around Baltimore.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | December 16, 2007
Day of Empire How Hyperpowers Rise to Global Dominance - And Why They Fall By Amy Chua Doubleday / 396 pages / $27.95 With the breakup of the Soviet Union, the United States entered some select company. The superpower became a "hyperpower." Like Persia, Rome, China, Mongolia and Great Britain, the United States attained military, economic and technological pre-eminence. It projects its power - and its values, language and lifestyles - over vast areas around the globe. In Day of Empire, Amy Chua, a professor at Yale Law School, traces the rise and fall of these global hegemons.
NEWS
August 16, 1991
The following is adapted from an editorial in the July 20 issue of the Economist. AMERICA has many contradictions but none greater than the fact that it was founded by puritans and yet invented tolerance.The tension between the busybodies of 1620 and the free spirits of 1776 has often marked American history: The puritan had the upper hand in Prohibition, the permissive had it in Woodstock.Like all things American, the contrast knob is turned up highest in California.San Franciscans treat homosexuals almost without prejudice, but 60 percent of Californians tell pollsters they want contraceptives forcibly implanted into drug-taking single mothers (thus simultaneously sanctioning fornication and eugenics)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jess Blumberg | October 31, 2002
Think lessons of cultural diversity and acceptance are way over a toddler's head? Think again. Barnes & Noble Booksellers and the Anti-Defamation League are co-sponsoring a "Close the Book on Hate Campaign," designed to educate young children (preschoolers to second-graders) about breaking the cycle of prejudice. Initiated after the Columbine High School tragedy, the campaign is in its third year of combating hate. This Saturday, it comes to Ellicott City's Barnes & Noble store. "We use stories to promote tolerance," Sherry L. Elswick, the store's community-relations manager, says of the event.
NEWS
June 12, 1996
IF TOLERANCE is to be the leitmotif of Bob Dole's bid for the presidency, history will treat him well even if he loses in November.As he bid farewell to the Senate yesterday, his insistence on applying tolerance to the anguished issue of abortion had already gotten him in trouble.Once free of prepared handouts, with all their artful ambiguities, he gloriously offended the religious right Monday by saying his call last week for tolerance in the Republican platform would not be relegated to a vague preamble, as his handlers had hinted, but would be tied directly to the plank dealing with abortion.
FEATURES
By Vicky Edwards and Vicky Edwards,Chicago Tribune | September 2, 1999
Ephraim Wolfe was walking down the street in Chicago with a friend early last month when a light blue car drove by.A few minutes later, the same car drove by again and stopped. A few seconds later, Wolfe saw a flash and heard a noise."I thought it was a firecracker," the 15-year-old said. "Then my leg felt heavy. I picked it up, and there was a hole the size of a dime and blood gushing out. I realized I'd been shot."The story of Benjamin Smith, who allegedly went on a shooting spree last month against several ethnic groups, made national news.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Lauren Cox, the wife of Ravens long snapper Morgan Cox, was not amused by Drake's song about cheating athletes at the ESPYs this week. Cox wrote a rambling blog post Thursday titled " Drake, take your 'side pieces' and shove it " -- a sharp contrast to her other posts, which usually discuss Bible verses. It's a little hard to parse Cox's writing, but apparently she was incensed that the event celebrated Michael Sam coming out as the first openly gay current NFL player while Drake's performance made light of athletes' infidelities.
NEWS
By Larry R. Faulkner and Donald N. Langenberg | June 25, 2014
Would you trust a surgeon who learned a few tricks in medical school, then spent the first couple of years in the operating room experimenting while he figured out which techniques worked? Of course you wouldn't. But, unfortunately, that's the same level of preparation that too many of our nation's teachers receive before setting foot in the classroom. Last week, the National Council on Teacher Quality released its exhaustive study of what's going on inside America's teaching institutions.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz and Lee S. Weinberg | June 15, 2014
Watching political debates - local, regional and national - the keen observer will note that they are like baseball stadiums: tailored for the advantage of a few, with parameters sometimes varying wildly to satisfy certain politicians, citizens, media outlets, etc. It is not an exaggeration to say that no format has ever satisfied all observers, and some of them satisfy very few. Some of the complaints are: there are too many or too few debates for...
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | May 13, 2014
At every Washington Capitals home game, hockey fans at the Verizon Center - including platoons of well-heeled defense industry consultants - rise to their feet to salute one soldier, sailor, Marine or airwoman from the "Wounded Warrior" program. Every honoree has served in either Afghanistan or Iraq; many have served multiple tours. In the next few weeks, hundreds of thousands of college students with beaming smiles will march across graduation stages to accept their diplomas.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Modern frontiers in fatuity: Last week at Jim Romenesko's website , we learned that Chris Quinn, the content chief of the Northeast Ohio Media Group, was so incensed about the profusion of typographical errors at Cleveland.com that he announced a zero tolerance policy in a memo.  Some salient passages:  “We hear from people about typos every day. It's a genuine crisis, and it threatens our long-term success. So I'm taking the drastic action of instituting a zero-tolerance policy for typos.” And "Ask a colleague to read your stuff before you post it. Or your spouse.
NEWS
March 29, 2014
It is despicable that Glenelg High School won't allow students to acknowledge the terrible loss of a young person as a result of bullying ( "Blue ribbons for Grace," March 26). It is a cowardly act on the part of the school to use the excuse that it would be glorifying her death. That is absurd. As educators, the school should be embracing an incredibly powerful "teachable moment" to a captive audience of students, parents, siblings, friends and extended family members. Let the message be broadcast as far and as often as possible: Bullying kills and there is zero tolerance policy for such behavior everywhere in society.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | November 24, 2007
Baltimore police are arresting fewer people than they have in years past, according to a recently released report, but almost 1,600 drug arrests in the first eight months of this year could not be prosecuted for lack of evidence. The decrease in arrests - 7,500 fewer through August compared with the corresponding period last year - provides evidence for what police officials have been saying: that they have stepped away from "zero-tolerance" policing. Jailing people for minor offenses that didn't result in criminal charges clogged the city jail and led to criticism and lawsuits.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2002
Mayor Martin O'Malley is planning to launch an aggressive anti-graffiti campaign, saying the age-old scourge is dragging Baltimore down. "It makes the city look trashy," he said yesterday. "In some neighborhoods, it's an out-and-out advertisement for open-air drug dealing. ... The key is rapid abatement." The steps he intends to take include: Adding three graffiti-removal crews to the six working citywide on public and private properties Seeking stronger penalties for convicted graffiti vandals and possibly requiring property owners to undo damage by a deadline Putting undercover police officers on stakeouts in unmarked cars outside properties that are hit repeatedly Establishing "no-tolerance" zones in high-visibility corridors that will be patrolled daily, with all identified graffiti removed Using an April 20 citywide cleanup, dubbed the "Super Spring Sweep Thing III: Let's Paint the Town," to encourage property owners to paint over graffiti with materials supplied by the city.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 26, 2014
"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. " -- Martin Luther King, Jr. Sometimes, you get the feeling that's the only King quote conservatives know. They can't quote what he said about unions: "We can all get more together than we can apart. " They can't quote what he said about poverty: "The solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a now widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
University System of Maryland officials are considering stiffening the penalties for college fraternities whose initiation rites cross the line from good-natured teasing to hazing that threatens life and limb. Pledging to join a campus fraternity or sorority has always involved a certain amount of ritualized torment for those who would cross the burning sands to full membership. Mostly it's all in good fun. But the merriment is apt to fade quickly if the antics lead to someone being seriously injured or killed or leave lasting psychological scars.
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