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NEWS
July 28, 2000
Capt. Joseph F. Enright, 89, the skipper of the submarine Archerfish, which sank the largest aircraft carrier of World War II, a Japanese ship whose existence had been unknown to the United States, died July 20 at his home in Fairfax, Va. For directing the sinking of the Shinano, Captain Enright, then a commander, was awarded the Navy Cross, the service's second-highest award for valor. Shortly before 9 p.m. Nov. 28, 1944, while the Archerfish was on surface patrol near the entrance to Tokyo Bay, its radar picked up a ship 12 miles away.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Lawrence E. Paradis, a retired cameraman whose career with WMAR-TV spanned nearly four decades, died Saturday of lung cancer at his Kingsville home. He was 87. Lawrence Ernest Paradis was born and raised in Groton, Conn., where he graduated in 1943 from Fitch High School. After high school, Mr. Paradis enlisted in the Marine Corps and he served in the Pacific theater as a radio operator. He fought at Peleliu and the Philippines and, near the end of the war, was attached to the fabled 6th Marine Division, helping to secure Tokyo Bay. Discharged with the rank of corporal in 1946, Mr. Paradis moved to Chicago, where he enrolled in the Lee De Forest Radio and Television School, earning his FCC radio and television licenses.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
Lawrence E. Paradis, a retired cameraman whose career with WMAR-TV spanned nearly four decades, died Saturday of lung cancer at his Kingsville home. He was 87. Lawrence Ernest Paradis was born and raised in Groton, Conn., where he graduated in 1943 from Fitch High School. After high school, Mr. Paradis enlisted in the Marine Corps and he served in the Pacific theater as a radio operator. He fought at Peleliu and the Philippines and, near the end of the war, was attached to the fabled 6th Marine Division, helping to secure Tokyo Bay. Discharged with the rank of corporal in 1946, Mr. Paradis moved to Chicago, where he enrolled in the Lee De Forest Radio and Television School, earning his FCC radio and television licenses.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 8, 2011
Robert B. Cunningham, a retired railroader and World War II Navy veteran, died Saturday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Perry Hall resident was 92. Mr. Cunningham, whose father was a World War I veteran and died in the influenza epidemic of 1918 and whose mother was a buyer for the old O'Neill's department store, was born in Baltimore. He was raised in a home across from Clifton Park, where he caddied for 75 cents a game and taught himself to play by copying the best players, family members said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 24, 2010
Carroll Leonard "Bo" Snyder, a former longtime Randallstown postal worker and World War II veteran, died Sept. 11 of pneumonia at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Sykesville resident was 90. Mr. Snyder was born on his family's farm in Randallstown and spent his early years there. The farm was lost after his father's death in 1931, and five years later, Mr. Snyder dropped out of Randallstown School, which in those days went from grades one to 12, to help support his family.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | January 26, 1991
In his book ''In Search of History'' the late, great, American chronicler Theodore H. White wrote about what happened in Tokyo Bay in 1945 aboard the U.S.S. Missouri.Japanese officials approached a table to sign documents of surrender, ending World War II. The overcast skies began clearing. Then there was a hum, then a thrum, then a roar. Four hundred American B-29s, coming from Guam and Saipan, flew low overhead. They were joined by 1,500 planes from the fleet, darkening the sun.The incredible fly-by was designed to remind the Japanese who was boss.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | August 27, 1994
TOKYO -- "Excuse me," says Kumihiro Yashiro competing with the roar of an airplane close overhead as he pulls a portable phone from his belt. "I'm working."He's also vacationing in the currently booming Japanese style of a semi-urban camping. A prolonged recession has prompted many Japanese to rethink holidays. For those who can't afford to take advantage of the high yen by going abroad, a new word has been coined to describe what's desired: ankintan, from the Chinese characters for cheap, close and brief.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 8, 2011
Robert B. Cunningham, a retired railroader and World War II Navy veteran, died Saturday of complications from a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Perry Hall resident was 92. Mr. Cunningham, whose father was a World War I veteran and died in the influenza epidemic of 1918 and whose mother was a buyer for the old O'Neill's department store, was born in Baltimore. He was raised in a home across from Clifton Park, where he caddied for 75 cents a game and taught himself to play by copying the best players, family members said.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | June 18, 1995
50 Years Ago* An enthusiastic group of Annapolis business and political leaders gathered for a session today under the slogan, "Keep the Naval Academy in Annapolis." It is supported by Gov. O'Conor who plans to enlist aid at the Eastern Governors Conference to secure Naval Academy retention on the East Coast. -- The Sun, Aug. 10, 1945.* The gates of the Naval Academy swung open to the public for the first time since Pearl Harbor and the public streamed in to watch the Middies celebrate the victory over Japan.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | August 27, 1995
From The Sun Aug. 27-Sept. 2, 1845Aug. 27: Correction -- In noticing the affair between Elizabeth Williams and Celia Robinson, yesterday, we somehow got "the cart before the horse." It was Elizabeth who assaulted Celia, and not as we stated in yesterday's paper.Aug. 28: Some days since we announced that a locomotive had run into a public carriage, which was crossing the tracks, knocked the carriage to pieces, and killed one passenger and one horse. The driver of the carriage was arrested, and not the engineer of the locomotive.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
Carroll Leonard "Bo" Snyder, a former longtime Randallstown postal worker and World War II veteran, died Sept. 11 of pneumonia at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. The Sykesville resident was 90. Mr. Snyder was born on his family's farm in Randallstown and spent his early years there. The farm was lost after his father's death in 1931, and five years later, Mr. Snyder dropped out of Randallstown School, which in those days went from grades one to 12, to help support his family.
NEWS
July 28, 2000
Capt. Joseph F. Enright, 89, the skipper of the submarine Archerfish, which sank the largest aircraft carrier of World War II, a Japanese ship whose existence had been unknown to the United States, died July 20 at his home in Fairfax, Va. For directing the sinking of the Shinano, Captain Enright, then a commander, was awarded the Navy Cross, the service's second-highest award for valor. Shortly before 9 p.m. Nov. 28, 1944, while the Archerfish was on surface patrol near the entrance to Tokyo Bay, its radar picked up a ship 12 miles away.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | August 27, 1994
TOKYO -- "Excuse me," says Kumihiro Yashiro competing with the roar of an airplane close overhead as he pulls a portable phone from his belt. "I'm working."He's also vacationing in the currently booming Japanese style of a semi-urban camping. A prolonged recession has prompted many Japanese to rethink holidays. For those who can't afford to take advantage of the high yen by going abroad, a new word has been coined to describe what's desired: ankintan, from the Chinese characters for cheap, close and brief.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | January 26, 1991
In his book ''In Search of History'' the late, great, American chronicler Theodore H. White wrote about what happened in Tokyo Bay in 1945 aboard the U.S.S. Missouri.Japanese officials approached a table to sign documents of surrender, ending World War II. The overcast skies began clearing. Then there was a hum, then a thrum, then a roar. Four hundred American B-29s, coming from Guam and Saipan, flew low overhead. They were joined by 1,500 planes from the fleet, darkening the sun.The incredible fly-by was designed to remind the Japanese who was boss.
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