Advertisement
HomeCollectionsToilet Seat
IN THE NEWS

Toilet Seat

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 22, 1993
As regular readers of this space know, my admiration for Ann Landers knows no bounds, to the point where I've written several columns lauding her innate wisdom and take-no-prisoners style of prose.In fact, after the last such column, I received a very nice thank-you note from Ms. Landers herself, who felt the need to add an affectionate (if parenthetical): "What the heck kind of name is Cowherd anyway?"Yes, well . . . in any event, if you read Ann Landers' column the other day, you know that there can no longer be any doubt that the country as a whole is suffering from a terminal case of stupidity.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
It began with a bathroom renovation and ended with a toilet race Saturday at Hampdenfest. Lisa Harbin and Bob Atkinson redid a bathroom in their Baltimore house this year, and what else could they do with their old toilet but mount it on a board between two bikes and roll it down Chestnut Street with crowds cheering and the toilet paper rolls on their bike swirling. With perfect late September weather and crowds that filled The Avenue for blocks, Hampdenfest went on a week later than usual but with fun, food and everything quintessentially Hampden.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By New York Times | January 16, 1992
NEW YORK -- Is a used toilet seat worth $1 million?The owners of one seat think so. That's because it's a three-holer. And not just any three-holer, but an Abstract Expressionist three-holer.And it was painted for a croquet party by Willem de Kooning, whose canvases have sold for more than $3 million, possibly with the help of one of his East Hampton, Long Island, roommates at the time, Jackson Pollock, whose work is even more valuable.The seat is executed in a style typical of the two masters.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
The rear axle came from a Honda that gave its last gasp 30 years ago. The front once belonged to a go-cart. But with this vehicle, the story's in all the body — a standard, flushable toilet, complete with a transparent seat dotted with coins. "I've had that toilet seat for like 10 years, waiting for something to do with it," laughs Alex Tasi, who, on Saturday, finally found it. The 42-year-old installer of solar panels from Annapolis was part of a small field of competitors that made dubious Baltimore history by participating in the first Hampdenfest Toilet Races, in which folks could ride anything down the course — as long as it included a "human defecation device.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Sun Columist | December 8, 2006
I know you can't catch AIDS from a toilet seat. What can you catch? Not much. You stand a much better chance of catching something nasty from the germs living in your kitchen sponges than from anything on your toilet seat, said Dr. Iain Fraser, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital. The image of the toilet seat as a carrier of noxious material "is more an aesthetic problem than a health problem," said Dr. John Bartlett, an infectious disease specialist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1998
You may have seen them.For two months, a couple dressed in tuxedos walked around a local mall selling their recently patented device -- The Gentleman -- in a real-life infomercial.It's an elegant presentation and name for a rather inelegant device. Installed on toilets, The Gentleman automatically lowers a raised toilet seat after flushing."I'm not sure where the idea came from, but it seemed like it was the right time for it," said Eric Anderson, founder of John Gault Enterprises, which manufactures, markets and distributes his invention, the company's only product.
FEATURES
By Mary Ann Grossmann and Mary Ann Grossmann,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 6, 1991
Go ahead, laugh when Paul Kunkel says he can teach a cat to use the toilet. Snicker at the image of Fluffy banging on the bathroom door.Just remember that when you're through sneering, you're going to have to clean the litter box -- and Mr. Kunkel isn't."
NEWS
By DAVID GRIMES and DAVID GRIMES,David Grimes is a columnist for the Sarasota Herald-Tribune | July 14, 1991
Sarasota, Florida. -- One of the things that makes relationships between men and women so difficult is that each has different needs. At least, that's the message I got after reading Herb Goldberg's book, "What Men Really Want."According to Mr. Goldberg, men shy away from commitment because it makes them feel vulnerable and weak. Women, on the other hand, crave intimacy and feel angry and frustrated when men pull back.I'm sure this psychological evaluation of the war between the sexes has a lot of merit, but some of the subtleties were lost on me. Being the rigid, controlling, cold, aloof, insensitive, patronizing male that I am, it seems to me that the whole matter can be summed up in a short list:What Men Really Want: Shoes.
FEATURES
April 24, 1994
A grave messageDeadly serious about keeping tobacco smoke about of your work or living space? The Message states in no uncertain terms that your space is a smoke-free environment. An individually crafted headstone reproduction made of Barre Grey granite, the Message is 5 1/4 inches tall and weighs 3.6 pounds. The stone has a highly polished facing, with the universal no-smoking symbol sandblasted into place and is mounted on a memorial base.Available by mail for $59.95 plus shipping and handling ($7.25 for first unit; $4.45 for each additional unit to same address)
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 7, 2006
Why say it with flowers when muskrat will more than do? Del. Pauline Menes, a 10-term Democrat from College Park who is retiring at the end of the session, received a muskrat-covered toilet seat the other night at a surprise party thrown by the women's caucus and the House Judiciary Committee. The odd gift was just like the one then-House Speaker Thomas Hunter Lowe had presented to Menes 35 years earlier. This time, the seat was meant to honor Menes, not embarrass her. In the early 1970s, Menes and the handful of other women in the House had to put up with lots of indignities.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | December 18, 2008
It is rather haunting, the notice above the Flush button in the toilet on the airliner, "Do Not Flush While Seated On Toilet." One imagines the engineers of the toilet running tests with flush dummies with big flat butts and the suction ripping the stuffing right out of them, and the engineers thinking, "Oh criminy, you mean we wasted three years on this sucker?" So lawyers were brought in to write the warning, which had to be short enough to be printed in large type so that geezers would see it, who are the ones most likely to flush while seated.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,Sun Columist | December 8, 2006
I know you can't catch AIDS from a toilet seat. What can you catch? Not much. You stand a much better chance of catching something nasty from the germs living in your kitchen sponges than from anything on your toilet seat, said Dr. Iain Fraser, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital. The image of the toilet seat as a carrier of noxious material "is more an aesthetic problem than a health problem," said Dr. John Bartlett, an infectious disease specialist at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | September 24, 2006
Edgar N. Genovese, a Little Italy native whose career included real estate and restaurant ownership, manufacturing and inventing, died Sept. 16 of complications from dementia at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 96 and had lived in Towson. Born in Baltimore, he was raised in Little Italy. As a youngster, he worked in a waffle cone factory, sold newspapers from streetcars and worked as a messenger for a gas and electric company, said his wife, the former Elizabeth Hlobick, whom he married in 1941.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | April 7, 2006
Why say it with flowers when muskrat will more than do? Del. Pauline Menes, a 10-term Democrat from College Park who is retiring at the end of the session, received a muskrat-covered toilet seat the other night at a surprise party thrown by the women's caucus and the House Judiciary Committee. The odd gift was just like the one then-House Speaker Thomas Hunter Lowe had presented to Menes 35 years earlier. This time, the seat was meant to honor Menes, not embarrass her. In the early 1970s, Menes and the handful of other women in the House had to put up with lots of indignities.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1998
You may have seen them.For two months, a couple dressed in tuxedos walked around a local mall selling their recently patented device -- The Gentleman -- in a real-life infomercial.It's an elegant presentation and name for a rather inelegant device. Installed on toilets, The Gentleman automatically lowers a raised toilet seat after flushing."I'm not sure where the idea came from, but it seemed like it was the right time for it," said Eric Anderson, founder of John Gault Enterprises, which manufactures, markets and distributes his invention, the company's only product.
NEWS
By Bill Buford | June 22, 1994
WHAT IS it about football that makes its followers behave so badly?By "football," I refer to the sport that people of all nations, except the United States, understand by that name: the one you play with your feet.It is also the one that everyone, everywhere, except possibly in the United States, will be watching through July 17 as the World Cup of soccer is played in America.And by the bad behavior of its followers, I allude to the game's century-long history of violence.And as far as I know, no other sport has caused a war -- the "Soccer War" between Honduras and El Salvador erupted after a World Cup qualifying match in 1969.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | September 24, 2006
Edgar N. Genovese, a Little Italy native whose career included real estate and restaurant ownership, manufacturing and inventing, died Sept. 16 of complications from dementia at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 96 and had lived in Towson. Born in Baltimore, he was raised in Little Italy. As a youngster, he worked in a waffle cone factory, sold newspapers from streetcars and worked as a messenger for a gas and electric company, said his wife, the former Elizabeth Hlobick, whom he married in 1941.
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | December 18, 2008
It is rather haunting, the notice above the Flush button in the toilet on the airliner, "Do Not Flush While Seated On Toilet." One imagines the engineers of the toilet running tests with flush dummies with big flat butts and the suction ripping the stuffing right out of them, and the engineers thinking, "Oh criminy, you mean we wasted three years on this sucker?" So lawyers were brought in to write the warning, which had to be short enough to be printed in large type so that geezers would see it, who are the ones most likely to flush while seated.
FEATURES
April 24, 1994
A grave messageDeadly serious about keeping tobacco smoke about of your work or living space? The Message states in no uncertain terms that your space is a smoke-free environment. An individually crafted headstone reproduction made of Barre Grey granite, the Message is 5 1/4 inches tall and weighs 3.6 pounds. The stone has a highly polished facing, with the universal no-smoking symbol sandblasted into place and is mounted on a memorial base.Available by mail for $59.95 plus shipping and handling ($7.25 for first unit; $4.45 for each additional unit to same address)
FEATURES
By Jennifer Bojorquez and Jennifer Bojorquez,McClatchy News Service | October 11, 1993
.TC Men talking about women: "Why does she always want to talk during the last 10 seconds of the game?" "She'll buy anything on sale, then tell me how much money she saved." "She has an uncanny ability to remember a fight we had 10 years ago . . . and bring it up now to her advantage."Women talking about men: "What is it with the remote control? Is channel surfing in their genetic makeup?" "He'll never use a map for directions. For that matter, he doesn't even know how to fold a map." And, "Why is it so hard to remember?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.