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Toilet Paper

FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 24, 2007
Lengths of snowy paper cover the floor of the rectangular stage at Sydonne's Event Hall. They drift around the bedposts and the ankles of the actors. Several strips, unrolled, form a makeshift screen for video projections. I thought at first that the streamers were made of crepe paper. But, it's not - the stuff is a disposable tissue found in finer bathrooms everywhere. And the decision to use toilet paper as a stage prop symbolizes much of what is right, but also some of what goes wrong, in this production of playwright Paula Vogel's The Baltimore Waltz.
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NEWS
June 3, 1993
Mayor defends his position on Denny'sAnnapolis Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins defended yesterday his failure to speak out on behalf of six black Secret Service agents who claim they were denied service at a Denny's just outside the city limits."
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
At every summer concert you can find the terminally prepared girl who's ready for anything: rancid bathrooms, sticky seats, alien invasions."You always worship that girl who whips out the bag of Kleenex and hands it to you," says Jimmy Hanrahan, senior wardrobe stylist at MTV. "You can be that girl everyone loves."She's not Einstein in a halter top. She's just experienced. Here are the lightweight concert essentials she wouldn't dare forget:* Waterproof sunscreen. Obvious, yes. So obvious, that you may forget it. Don't, unless you want to be a rock lobster.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus | July 18, 2007
The recent Burning Question about restaurant restroom shortcomings provoked an outpouring of reader responses. Most people agreed with my complaints (lack of toilet paper, no soap, unfortunate soap, lack of paper towels, inefficient paper-towel dispensers, faulty stall-door locks). Many more sent in their own. The No. 1-by-a-mile complaint among respondents: Stalls with no hook to hang a handbag. About a third of you vented frustrations about having to put your bag on the floor or hold it while you attended to ... other tasks.
NEWS
February 10, 1994
This is mere speculation and we have no guess as to how long the transformation will last, but we sense that Old Man Winter's relentless pounding this year might be having one positive offshoot: Marylanders seem to be getting hardier.In the past, when Maryland would experience its one or two winter storms, the panic that preceded the precipitation was palpable. Buy toilet paper. Buy perishables. Abandon ye vehicle. Even if one had not been glued to the radio or tube for the latest update, the sight of barren bread racks at the supermarket betrayed the forecast.
NEWS
October 14, 1995
CALL IT the winter of '94 flashback syndrome. Even on an Indian summer day in October, you hear that the venerable Hagers-Town Town and Country Almanack is predicting above-average snow in Maryland this coming winter and you've all but got your car pointed in the direction of the grocery store for milk and toilet paper rations.The logical side of your brain tries to remind you that long-range weather forecasting is a fragile art. In fact, over the last five years, the almanac has been wrong as often as right.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | March 15, 1993
The storm has passed, and it's all over but the shoveling. Oh but it was dicey for awhile.Personally, I'm down to my last six gallons of milk, 12 loaves of bread and 16 rolls of toilet paper (eight pink, four yellow, four blue). I don't know how much longer I could have held out.You talk about your close calls.They say it was the worst storm of the century, meaning most of us were trapped in our houses for ONE ENTIRE DAY!!!!!No wonder people panicked.ONE ENTIRE DAY at home? What if you hadn't gotten to the video store?
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | March 2, 2008
I don't know how it is possible to lose the little spring-loaded tube that holds a standard toilet paper roll in a wall dispenser, but it recently happened in our house. Because this is not an item that falls into the needs-replacement-urgently category, I figured we could all deal with the roll of toilet paper sitting on the vanity or tank for a few days until we found the missing roll-holder thingy. After searching the wastebasket, linen closet and bathroom cabinets to no avail, I convinced myself that the expandable white cylinder would soon turn up in someone's backpack, purse or coat pocket - though I couldn't imagine why. It is one of those items that, in addition to being nameless, has only one conceivable function, which is to hold toilet paper.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2000
With winter just a day away, a low-pressure system from the Midwest brought up to a half-foot of snow to Western Maryland yesterday while the Baltimore area got a little more than 2 inches. Although salted roadways in the metro area remained generally clear through 11 p.m., side streets, lawns and the tops of cars were heavy with snow. Snowfall was expected to end about 1 a.m. today. The wet snow crossed the Ohio Valley late Monday, moved east into Maryland from Virginia before noon and picked up as the afternoon and evening wore on. It was joined by a similar low-pressure system that landed here from the Carolina coast.
FEATURES
By Gina Spadafori and Gina Spadafori,McClatchy News Service | October 12, 1991
Want to keep your dog from napping in the armchair? Your cat from playing with the toilet paper? Try setting up a little booby trap with a mousetrap.Here's how it works: When a mousetrap is triggered by motion, it goes off with a snap and leaps into the air. The noise and the motion are startling and unpleasant to a pet, who will associate the unpleasantness with the site and avoid similar situations in the future.And no, a little mousetrap will not harm your pet. In this capacity, it serves as noisemaker, nothing more.
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