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Todd Oldham

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By Jim Servin and Jim Servin,N.Y. Times News Service | May 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- A woman in black rushed up to Todd Oldham as he entered the paint-by-numbers show at the Bridgewater Lustberg gallery in SoHo a few weeks ago. "Of course, you'd be here," she chirped, throwing an air kiss to the 30-year-old designer. "Your work is so kitschy."Mr. Oldham, a native Texan who can look like a wholesome farm boy one minute and a Joe Orton punk the next, smiled his best Opie smile and walked away, slightly irked."Congratulations, you star," said Kachin Kobayashi, a fashion stylist.
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By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | June 20, 2004
For Todd Oldham, the world is a kaleidoscope. It's all about color and pattern. But it's how he combines them that sets him apart. Even a simple bar code translates as a rainbow stripe. In fact, stripes are an Oldham signature. So are dots and stars. Anything geometric or squiggly, animal-printed or tweedy is in his repertoire of patterns. That fresh, almost childlike aesthetic applied to furnishings is what stopped retailers and home design editors in their tracks when Oldham teamed up with an unlikely partner last October at the biannual Home Furnishings Market in High Point, N.C. It was the most successful launch in the history of a once-stuffy La-Z-Boy.
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By Jill Gerston and Jill Gerston,Special to The Sun | December 1, 1994
New York -- "I LOVE IT!" shrieks Ricki Lake, preening before a full-length mirror in a simple, tailored black pants suit. "So what do you think?""You look great," soothes designer Todd Oldham, who is getting the talk show host ready for a television awards ceremony. He nips in the waistline an inch and piles her hair on her head in a sexy tumble of curls festooned with colorful rhinestone barettes. "What we don't want is to do some heap of beads like all the soap opera ladies wear. Because the suit is so elegant, you can go for it with the hair.
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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | October 26, 2003
The average American furniture buyer may not recognize companies like Southern, Palecek, Bernhardt, Vaughan and Shady Lady. But Antiques Roadshow, the National Geographic Society, Martha Stewart, NASCAR and Woolrich? Those are names you know and trust. Driving brands The designers of the new NASCAR Collection by Vaughan Furniture toned down the stock car theme for its adult line. Some of the furniture's cherry veneers had a checkerboard pattern that might suggest a checkered flag, but could just as well be a traditional country check.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | June 20, 2004
For Todd Oldham, the world is a kaleidoscope. It's all about color and pattern. But it's how he combines them that sets him apart. Even a simple bar code translates as a rainbow stripe. In fact, stripes are an Oldham signature. So are dots and stars. Anything geometric or squiggly, animal-printed or tweedy is in his repertoire of patterns. That fresh, almost childlike aesthetic applied to furnishings is what stopped retailers and home design editors in their tracks when Oldham teamed up with an unlikely partner last October at the biannual Home Furnishings Market in High Point, N.C. It was the most successful launch in the history of a once-stuffy La-Z-Boy.
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By N.Y. Times | September 18, 1991
When is a shirt not just something to hide under a jacket? When it's gussied up with fancy buttons that transform it into an important article of clothing.But not to worry. The buttons won't get mangled in the laundry if they are the latest fad: button covers that clip onto a shirt's basic plastic buttons.They take a variety of forms, including hearts, flowers, coins, colored stones and mirrors, cameos, cat faces and, of course, pearls. They are sold in matched or mismatched sets of six and cost from about $24 to $48.Macy's has sold the buttons for a couple of years, but they really took off this spring, thanks to the emphasis on jewelry-like buttons by Chanel, Christian Lacroix, Todd Oldham, Gemma Kahng and Zang Toi.
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By Amy Spindler and Amy Spindler,New York Times News Service | January 6, 1994
Todd Oldham's spring runway show felt like an epiphany, a moment where shards of his ideas from the past, of mirrors, gilt and decorated fabrics, fell away to reveal the talent beneath.Surreal, nostalgic and futuristic, that show signaled that Mr. Oldham was ready to step forward.That step will be taken this year. Mr. Oldham will be the latest artist in residence on Wooster Street in March, when he moves his offices and showroom to SoHo. He is looking for boutique space on the street as well.
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By VIDA ROBERTS | November 9, 1995
BILL BLASSHe was there, doing that uptown style to perfection, when Anna Wintour was still in knee socks. Ladies who can never be too rich or too thin continue to flock to his shows because a Blass design beautifully covers untuckable trouble spots.Blass doesn't make waves or launch trends; he just continues to make beautiful clothes.This spring, as other designers flirt with Sixties influences, Blass polishes his repertory of the American classics he invented. hTC Double-faced wool coats over matching dresses are seam stitched to enhance the shape.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | October 26, 2003
The average American furniture buyer may not recognize companies like Southern, Palecek, Bernhardt, Vaughan and Shady Lady. But Antiques Roadshow, the National Geographic Society, Martha Stewart, NASCAR and Woolrich? Those are names you know and trust. Driving brands The designers of the new NASCAR Collection by Vaughan Furniture toned down the stock car theme for its adult line. Some of the furniture's cherry veneers had a checkerboard pattern that might suggest a checkered flag, but could just as well be a traditional country check.
FEATURES
By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,Orange County Register | June 29, 1995
"Holy high fashion, Batman!"Just in time for the smash movie "Batman Forever": Todd Oldham's fanciful clothes and Robert Lee Morris' sleek jewelry.Mr. Oldham's clothes and accessories are available in 13 Warner Bros. Studio Stores. Mr. Morris' jewelry is available in the stores and from the Warner Bros. Studio Store catalog.It's unusual for well-known clothing and jewelry designers to create collections of high-end, limited-edition fashion items that marry the designers' touch with film costume-designers' ideas.
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By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | August 25, 2002
On a recent evening at Towson Place, the stores were teeming with an unusually frantic group of shoppers: parents and their college-bound progeny. Cramming their carts with merchandise, they cruised aisles filled with plastic, pastel-colored shower caddies, polka-dotted throw rugs and collap-sible shoe racks. They clung to coupons and scanned the shelves for bargains. When they found them, they piled their carts higher. And higher. "This is a marathon," said Baltimore resident Beth Ahearn, peering over a cart filled with flower-print bedding for her 18-year-old daughter, Molly, soon to be a freshman at Georgetown University.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | November 9, 1995
BILL BLASSHe was there, doing that uptown style to perfection, when Anna Wintour was still in knee socks. Ladies who can never be too rich or too thin continue to flock to his shows because a Blass design beautifully covers untuckable trouble spots.Blass doesn't make waves or launch trends; he just continues to make beautiful clothes.This spring, as other designers flirt with Sixties influences, Blass polishes his repertory of the American classics he invented. hTC Double-faced wool coats over matching dresses are seam stitched to enhance the shape.
FEATURES
By Lisa Lytle and Lisa Lytle,Orange County Register | June 29, 1995
"Holy high fashion, Batman!"Just in time for the smash movie "Batman Forever": Todd Oldham's fanciful clothes and Robert Lee Morris' sleek jewelry.Mr. Oldham's clothes and accessories are available in 13 Warner Bros. Studio Stores. Mr. Morris' jewelry is available in the stores and from the Warner Bros. Studio Store catalog.It's unusual for well-known clothing and jewelry designers to create collections of high-end, limited-edition fashion items that marry the designers' touch with film costume-designers' ideas.
FEATURES
By Jill Gerston and Jill Gerston,Special to The Sun | December 1, 1994
New York -- "I LOVE IT!" shrieks Ricki Lake, preening before a full-length mirror in a simple, tailored black pants suit. "So what do you think?""You look great," soothes designer Todd Oldham, who is getting the talk show host ready for a television awards ceremony. He nips in the waistline an inch and piles her hair on her head in a sexy tumble of curls festooned with colorful rhinestone barettes. "What we don't want is to do some heap of beads like all the soap opera ladies wear. Because the suit is so elegant, you can go for it with the hair.
FEATURES
By Amy Spindler and Amy Spindler,New York Times News Service | January 6, 1994
Todd Oldham's spring runway show felt like an epiphany, a moment where shards of his ideas from the past, of mirrors, gilt and decorated fabrics, fell away to reveal the talent beneath.Surreal, nostalgic and futuristic, that show signaled that Mr. Oldham was ready to step forward.That step will be taken this year. Mr. Oldham will be the latest artist in residence on Wooster Street in March, when he moves his offices and showroom to SoHo. He is looking for boutique space on the street as well.
FEATURES
November 11, 1993
Anna SuiAnna Sui, one of the new kids on the designer circuit, presented a romping kiddie collection. She wants to put the twentysomethings who patronize her street-smart line into naughty baby dresses and schoolgirl gear. She sent out little plaid cotton kilts with shrunken Peruvian sweaters, a lighthearted summer version of street grunge. On the sweeter side, she showed short denim apron wrap dresses, silver leather hot pants and hip skirts and skimpy vintage print shifts. To reinforce the kiddie theme, she put models in fuzzy stuffed animal hats, white knee socks and silver tap-dance-class shoes.
FEATURES
By Orla Healy and Orla Healy,New York Daily News | September 7, 1993
What does MTV stand for -- Music TV or Major Trend Visionary?Both, of course!Madonna's decision to unveil her new "Girlie Show" on Thursday night's video-awards broadcast is very much in tune with the vibe that MTV is the most powerful influence on the global fashion industry.The Material One's move says a lot about MTV's clout, according to Gabe Doppelt, editor in chief of Mademoiselle magazine.Ms. Doppelt points to the fashion industry's obsession with grunge last season as a perfect example of how the network is influencing the way we dress -- from hip-hopping club kids to haute couture designers.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | August 25, 2002
On a recent evening at Towson Place, the stores were teeming with an unusually frantic group of shoppers: parents and their college-bound progeny. Cramming their carts with merchandise, they cruised aisles filled with plastic, pastel-colored shower caddies, polka-dotted throw rugs and collap-sible shoe racks. They clung to coupons and scanned the shelves for bargains. When they found them, they piled their carts higher. And higher. "This is a marathon," said Baltimore resident Beth Ahearn, peering over a cart filled with flower-print bedding for her 18-year-old daughter, Molly, soon to be a freshman at Georgetown University.
FEATURES
By Orla Healy and Orla Healy,New York Daily News | September 7, 1993
What does MTV stand for -- Music TV or Major Trend Visionary?Both, of course!Madonna's decision to unveil her new "Girlie Show" on Thursday night's video-awards broadcast is very much in tune with the vibe that MTV is the most powerful influence on the global fashion industry.The Material One's move says a lot about MTV's clout, according to Gabe Doppelt, editor in chief of Mademoiselle magazine.Ms. Doppelt points to the fashion industry's obsession with grunge last season as a perfect example of how the network is influencing the way we dress -- from hip-hopping club kids to haute couture designers.
FEATURES
By Jim Servin and Jim Servin,N.Y. Times News Service | May 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- A woman in black rushed up to Todd Oldham as he entered the paint-by-numbers show at the Bridgewater Lustberg gallery in SoHo a few weeks ago. "Of course, you'd be here," she chirped, throwing an air kiss to the 30-year-old designer. "Your work is so kitschy."Mr. Oldham, a native Texan who can look like a wholesome farm boy one minute and a Joe Orton punk the next, smiled his best Opie smile and walked away, slightly irked."Congratulations, you star," said Kachin Kobayashi, a fashion stylist.
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