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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 13, 1991
'Poison'Starring James Lyons and Scott Renderer.Directed by Todd Haynes.Released by Zeitgeist Films.Unratted... One man's "Poison" is not necessarily another man's meat -- particularly this man's.However despicable the efforts by various conservative fulminators to use the NEA grant that funded Todd Haynes' film as a fulcrum to discredit the entire arts-funding program, the movie itself is a lot less interesting than the debate it so famously engendered earlier this year.Haynes, who achieved some limited notoriety for a film bio of Karen Carpenter in which all the parts were played by Barbie dolls, is less an artist than a provocateur.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
For Julianne Moore, everything comes down to the vision thing. Not hers. Her director's. "I don't care what kind of vision it is, as long as they have one," says Moore, 38, who in just eight years has become one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood. And it's not just anyone who's been doing the seeking: since 1992, when audiences first noticed her as Annabella Sciorra's unfortunate friend in "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle," Moore has been recruited by an impressive roster of directors.
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By Chris Kaltenbach The hills are alive | November 20, 1998
Yes, Todd Haynes realizes that Curt Wild, one of the main characters in his paean to the glam rock era, "Velvet Goldmine," is a dead ringer for Kurt Cobain.And no, that's not an effect he was going for -- the character was modeled after Iggy Pop."It was completely an accident," Haynes insists (as was the happenstance that his character and the late Nirvana lead singer share the same first name). "It just so happens that Ewan [McGregor, who plays Wild] resembles Kurt Cobain more than he does Iggy Pop in the face."
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By Amy Wallace and Amy Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 1999
PARK CITY, Utah -- He has a boyish face and a skinny, 6-foot-4 frame, and when he walks down Main Street here at the Sundance Film Festival, a knapsack on his shoulder and an orange T-shirt peeking out from under a woolly gray sweater, he looks less like a deal-maker than a sophomore in the middle of final exams.But the single, sibilant syllable of this lawyer's last name has power in the independent film community. It can open doors. Which is why the cleverest party-crashers here have been dropping it lately to gain entry to the festival's wild bashes.
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By Lou Cedrone | June 13, 1991
The controversial ''Poison,'' opening today at The Charles, is a crudely made, faintly realized three-in-one, a movie whose only real distinction is that all three stories are based on tales by Jean Genet, the French author-playwright.And there is the controversy. Some have criticized the National Endowment for the Arts for having helped financed the film. People were apparently upset over the homosexual activity in the film. It's not the most explicit we have seen at the Charles, but then it's not exactly tame, either.
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By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 6, 1998
DOUBLE DARINGToday marks the Baltimore release of two films by Todd Solondz and Todd Haynes, promising directors who possess distinctive cinematic visions.Haynes, whose "Velvet Goldmine," an ode to 1970's glam rock, opens at the Rotunda -- is best known for the 1995's "Safe," in which Julianne Moore played a homemaker anxious about her environment.Solondz, -- whose "Happiness," a jaundiced portrait of family life, opens at the Charles -- gained wide renown with 1995's art-house hit "Welcome to the Dollhouse," a ruthlessly unsentimental portrait of 11-year-old nerd queen Dawn Wiener.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
For Julianne Moore, everything comes down to the vision thing. Not hers. Her director's. "I don't care what kind of vision it is, as long as they have one," says Moore, 38, who in just eight years has become one of the most sought-after actresses in Hollywood. And it's not just anyone who's been doing the seeking: since 1992, when audiences first noticed her as Annabella Sciorra's unfortunate friend in "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle," Moore has been recruited by an impressive roster of directors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Wallace and Amy Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 31, 1999
PARK CITY, Utah -- He has a boyish face and a skinny, 6-foot-4 frame, and when he walks down Main Street here at the Sundance Film Festival, a knapsack on his shoulder and an orange T-shirt peeking out from under a woolly gray sweater, he looks less like a deal-maker than a sophomore in the middle of final exams.But the single, sibilant syllable of this lawyer's last name has power in the independent film community. It can open doors. Which is why the cleverest party-crashers here have been dropping it lately to gain entry to the festival's wild bashes.
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By New York Times | January 28, 1991
PARK CITY, Utah -- With less pain and more unanimity than is usual at the Sundance Film Festival, the dramatic film jury awarded its grand prize to "Poison," a first feature by gay filmmaker Todd Haynes."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 30, 2007
In recent years, arthouse cinema has developed its own version of the studio or network "high concept" - an idea for a movie or TV show that can be summarized in a phrase or sentence, such as "MTV cops" for Miami Vice. For Memento, it was "widower with short-term memory loss seeks wife's murderer." For Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, it was "couple learns about love as they erase each other from their memories." The problem with these films is that all their fun and invention go into the concept.
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By Chris Kaltenbach The hills are alive | November 20, 1998
Yes, Todd Haynes realizes that Curt Wild, one of the main characters in his paean to the glam rock era, "Velvet Goldmine," is a dead ringer for Kurt Cobain.And no, that's not an effect he was going for -- the character was modeled after Iggy Pop."It was completely an accident," Haynes insists (as was the happenstance that his character and the late Nirvana lead singer share the same first name). "It just so happens that Ewan [McGregor, who plays Wild] resembles Kurt Cobain more than he does Iggy Pop in the face."
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 6, 1998
DOUBLE DARINGToday marks the Baltimore release of two films by Todd Solondz and Todd Haynes, promising directors who possess distinctive cinematic visions.Haynes, whose "Velvet Goldmine," an ode to 1970's glam rock, opens at the Rotunda -- is best known for the 1995's "Safe," in which Julianne Moore played a homemaker anxious about her environment.Solondz, -- whose "Happiness," a jaundiced portrait of family life, opens at the Charles -- gained wide renown with 1995's art-house hit "Welcome to the Dollhouse," a ruthlessly unsentimental portrait of 11-year-old nerd queen Dawn Wiener.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | June 13, 1991
The controversial ''Poison,'' opening today at The Charles, is a crudely made, faintly realized three-in-one, a movie whose only real distinction is that all three stories are based on tales by Jean Genet, the French author-playwright.And there is the controversy. Some have criticized the National Endowment for the Arts for having helped financed the film. People were apparently upset over the homosexual activity in the film. It's not the most explicit we have seen at the Charles, but then it's not exactly tame, either.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 13, 1991
'Poison'Starring James Lyons and Scott Renderer.Directed by Todd Haynes.Released by Zeitgeist Films.Unratted... One man's "Poison" is not necessarily another man's meat -- particularly this man's.However despicable the efforts by various conservative fulminators to use the NEA grant that funded Todd Haynes' film as a fulcrum to discredit the entire arts-funding program, the movie itself is a lot less interesting than the debate it so famously engendered earlier this year.Haynes, who achieved some limited notoriety for a film bio of Karen Carpenter in which all the parts were played by Barbie dolls, is less an artist than a provocateur.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 21, 2007
If any man should be more than the sum of his parts, it's an artist. But Todd Haynes' I'm Not There makes Bob Dylan less than the sum of his parts. It's like a tony art-school parlor game. Haynes, who directed and co-wrote (with Oren Moverman) this multipart biographical essay on Dylan, must have spent too much time wondering, "If I were a multifaceted, forward-moving, self-created singer-songwriter poet like Dylan, who would I get to play me?" What he arrives at is not one but a half-dozen performers who represent different phases of Dylan's life.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | April 8, 2004
A documentary look at a drag queen pageant, a parody of "women in prison" films, a chronicle of Floridians struggling to reform their state's voting process and an investigation of racial identity within the punk scene - these are just some of the experiences awaiting visitors to this year's Johns Hopkins Film Festival. The sixth-annual festival, opening tonight and running through Sunday, is scaled back from previous years, when films were shown at venues scattered throughout the campus.
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