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By Sandy Moser | November 13, 1992
I PASS their outposts on my way to work: teen-agers and children, communities of them, clustered around stop signs, or inside metal shelters, or at the ends of driveways.The larger groups lean and laugh against one another, while the single children -- the only youngsters on their street or block, jiggle their thin knees for warmth. On very cold mornings I watch them rub webs of frost from the backs of metal street signs.And from my cracked window, rolled down an inch for circulation, I can smell it: cold and certain, as crisp as milk from a metal cup.Autumn smells like independence.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 12, 2005
THE FOUNDATION for Child Development crunches all sorts of statistics from all sorts of places and every year calculates what it calls the index of child well-being, or CWI. The Duke University social scientists concluded that, overall, children are modestly better off than they were when they began taking this measure in 1975. But it was a good news-bad news kind of report. While there have been dramatic declines in violence and risky behavior among children and teens, school test scores are stagnant and the overall health of children continues to decline because of rampant obesity.
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NEWS
January 1, 2005
MORE THAN half the world's children face a future of certain deprivation. Orphaned by poverty, AIDS or war. Abducted into the armies of warlords. Sold into the sex trade. Exploited by labor crews. Maimed by landmines. As described in UNICEF's The State of the World's Children 2005, children are suffering mightily and governments are to blame for much of their despair. The examples are numerous. As militias displace families and children in western Darfur, Sudanese officials have yet to disarm them.
NEWS
January 1, 2005
MORE THAN half the world's children face a future of certain deprivation. Orphaned by poverty, AIDS or war. Abducted into the armies of warlords. Sold into the sex trade. Exploited by labor crews. Maimed by landmines. As described in UNICEF's The State of the World's Children 2005, children are suffering mightily and governments are to blame for much of their despair. The examples are numerous. As militias displace families and children in western Darfur, Sudanese officials have yet to disarm them.
NEWS
March 31, 1992
The Center for Social Policy has released a report that is truly shocking: Children in this state are more likely than kids across the country to die in infancy, to be killed as teen-agers or to live in single-parent households, a sure route to underprivileged status.Maryland's wealth statistics have been misleading. Our state ranks fifth nationally in median income, but that ignores other, more pertinent indicators of social well-being. One standout is the Baltimore metropolitan region's low ranking in adults who are high-school graduates.
NEWS
August 24, 1996
I TAKE INSULT from your Aug. 15 editorial, ''Childhood in the suburbs.'' Yes, there has been a rise in the two-income family, but this does not justify a decline in the two-parent family.My husband and I and the majority of our friends and business associates take pride in our child rearing. We also take pride in our careers.Our children understand that by both of us working we are able to offer more opportunities to them, such as better education and home environments.My children are in a wonderful after-school program that stimulates them scholastically, as well as allowing them to participate in games and organized sports.
NEWS
By MARTHA PHILLIPS AND JOHN ROTHER | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- You can probably count on half the fingers of one hand the number of times recently that the Concord Coalition, which works for a balanced budget, and the American Association of Retired Persons, which advocates for the elderly, have been on the same side of a public-policy battle. The current debate over the child tax credit is one of those rare instances of common ground.We are dismayed at the prospect of enacting an unnecessary and large tax cut at this time -- even one benignly labeled a ''child tax credit.
NEWS
By Anne Werps | September 21, 1994
ONE OF the joys of parenting is rediscovering old childhood loves. The latest for me is roller skating. I no longer skate outside on the pavement, careening down hills. Now I enjoy skating indoors to music. And my children like it, too.A party at a roller rink unlocked the joy of skating for one of my children. Although a few improvements could be made, it remains a pretty good choice of activities. The music could be more varied and sometimes I don't care much for some of the lyrics. The snack bar could provide healthier choices and the video games aren't necessary; I figure children are exposed to those things at home anyway.
NEWS
By Connie K. Walters | October 22, 1991
RECENTLY TV comedian Roseanne Barr Arnold and others have shared their private fears and horror stories about what happened to them as abused children.Increasingly, well-known personalities are allowing the children inside them to speak and remember what happened to them during what should have been the happiest, most carefree times of their lives.I know. I was abused as a child. Not by my parents but by one of their friends. The year I started first grade, this man -- I'll call him "Mr. Ted" -- came into my life and remained there for almost 20 years.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 12, 2005
THE FOUNDATION for Child Development crunches all sorts of statistics from all sorts of places and every year calculates what it calls the index of child well-being, or CWI. The Duke University social scientists concluded that, overall, children are modestly better off than they were when they began taking this measure in 1975. But it was a good news-bad news kind of report. While there have been dramatic declines in violence and risky behavior among children and teens, school test scores are stagnant and the overall health of children continues to decline because of rampant obesity.
NEWS
August 24, 1996
I TAKE INSULT from your Aug. 15 editorial, ''Childhood in the suburbs.'' Yes, there has been a rise in the two-income family, but this does not justify a decline in the two-parent family.My husband and I and the majority of our friends and business associates take pride in our child rearing. We also take pride in our careers.Our children understand that by both of us working we are able to offer more opportunities to them, such as better education and home environments.My children are in a wonderful after-school program that stimulates them scholastically, as well as allowing them to participate in games and organized sports.
NEWS
By Gayle Vassar Melvin | August 15, 1996
ONCE UPON A time, there were wolves who ate grandmas, pigs who built houses and frogs who could became princes with one magic kiss.Then children became more sophisticated and lost their need for fairy tales.Or did they?Today's children may need the magic of fairy tales even more than their parents did, says Bette Bosma, author of "Fairy Tales, Fables, Legends and Myths: Using Folk Literature in Your Classroom" (Teachers College Press, Columbia) and professor emerita at Calvin College in Michigan.
NEWS
By MARTHA PHILLIPS AND JOHN ROTHER | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- You can probably count on half the fingers of one hand the number of times recently that the Concord Coalition, which works for a balanced budget, and the American Association of Retired Persons, which advocates for the elderly, have been on the same side of a public-policy battle. The current debate over the child tax credit is one of those rare instances of common ground.We are dismayed at the prospect of enacting an unnecessary and large tax cut at this time -- even one benignly labeled a ''child tax credit.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 1995
They suffer more assaults than any other age group.Two-thirds of them have tried alcohol. A third have tried illicit drugs. A third have thought about suicide.They are smoking more (cigarettes and marijuana), having sex more (protected and unprotected), and being murdered more (their homicide rate doubled between 1985 and 1992).They are not 18-year-olds, not 16, not even 15.They are children 10 to 14, going through one of the most troubled passages of life -- and, according to a report to be released today, society is less likely than ever to help them through it.The report, by the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development, charges that the United States is neglecting its 19 million children in that age group.
NEWS
By Anne Werps | September 21, 1994
ONE OF the joys of parenting is rediscovering old childhood loves. The latest for me is roller skating. I no longer skate outside on the pavement, careening down hills. Now I enjoy skating indoors to music. And my children like it, too.A party at a roller rink unlocked the joy of skating for one of my children. Although a few improvements could be made, it remains a pretty good choice of activities. The music could be more varied and sometimes I don't care much for some of the lyrics. The snack bar could provide healthier choices and the video games aren't necessary; I figure children are exposed to those things at home anyway.
NEWS
By Sandy Moser | November 13, 1992
I PASS their outposts on my way to work: teen-agers and children, communities of them, clustered around stop signs, or inside metal shelters, or at the ends of driveways.The larger groups lean and laugh against one another, while the single children -- the only youngsters on their street or block, jiggle their thin knees for warmth. On very cold mornings I watch them rub webs of frost from the backs of metal street signs.And from my cracked window, rolled down an inch for circulation, I can smell it: cold and certain, as crisp as milk from a metal cup.Autumn smells like independence.
NEWS
By Gayle Vassar Melvin | August 15, 1996
ONCE UPON A time, there were wolves who ate grandmas, pigs who built houses and frogs who could became princes with one magic kiss.Then children became more sophisticated and lost their need for fairy tales.Or did they?Today's children may need the magic of fairy tales even more than their parents did, says Bette Bosma, author of "Fairy Tales, Fables, Legends and Myths: Using Folk Literature in Your Classroom" (Teachers College Press, Columbia) and professor emerita at Calvin College in Michigan.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | October 12, 1995
They suffer more assaults than any other age group.Two-thirds of them have tried alcohol. A third have tried illicit drugs. A third have thought about suicide.They are smoking more (cigarettes and marijuana), having sex more (protected and unprotected), and being murdered more (their homicide rate doubled between 1985 and 1992).They are not 18-year-olds, not 16, not even 15.They are children 10 to 14, going through one of the most troubled passages of life -- and, according to a report to be released today, society is less likely than ever to help them through it.The report, by the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development, charges that the United States is neglecting its 19 million children in that age group.
NEWS
March 31, 1992
The Center for Social Policy has released a report that is truly shocking: Children in this state are more likely than kids across the country to die in infancy, to be killed as teen-agers or to live in single-parent households, a sure route to underprivileged status.Maryland's wealth statistics have been misleading. Our state ranks fifth nationally in median income, but that ignores other, more pertinent indicators of social well-being. One standout is the Baltimore metropolitan region's low ranking in adults who are high-school graduates.
NEWS
By Connie K. Walters | October 22, 1991
RECENTLY TV comedian Roseanne Barr Arnold and others have shared their private fears and horror stories about what happened to them as abused children.Increasingly, well-known personalities are allowing the children inside them to speak and remember what happened to them during what should have been the happiest, most carefree times of their lives.I know. I was abused as a child. Not by my parents but by one of their friends. The year I started first grade, this man -- I'll call him "Mr. Ted" -- came into my life and remained there for almost 20 years.
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