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By Eleanor R. Gillespie and Eleanor R. Gillespie,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2003
There's an old saying in horse racing: Breed the best to the best and hope for the best. That's exactly what director Gary Ross does with Seabiscuit. He's taken a trio of superb actors - Tobey Maguire, Jeff Bridges, Chris Cooper - and Laura Hillenbrand's thrillingly good best seller and melded them into a graceful, intelligent and heartfelt film. Right from the beginning, Ross lets us know this is not going to be just another maverick-stallion-finds-love-and-wins-th e-Big-Race story. Seabiscuit himself ( several horses, but Fighting Ferrari in close-ups)
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By Courtney Pomeroy and Courtney Pomeroy,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
The Little Italy Open Air Film Festival continues its weekly outdoor movie screenings tonight with Seabiscuit. Red Pollard - Tobey Maguire's first major film role after starring in Spider-Man - is a Depression-era jockey with a broken spirit who finds hope through his exceptional horse, Seabiscuit. One of Seabiscuit's most memorable and inspiring races in the film takes place at Pimlico Race Course. This historical, inspirational and Oscar-nominated movie will be playing at 9 p.m. at High and Stiles streets.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 23, 2003
In an era when "crowd-pleasing" has become a disparaging term because of smash hits content to push sadistic or sentimental buttons, Seabiscuit dares to be great. This adaptation of Laura Hillenbrand's nonfiction best seller will move large audiences to applause and tears while deepening their feelings for the mysteries of character, the majesty of athletics and the thrill of our democratic culture at its best, when figures from nowhere become true popular champions. Boldly echoing the trajectory of the legendary racehorse who learned how to channel his herky-jerky energy into a fierce and indomitable running style, the movie starts out with an unusual gait, cutting among the individual stories of three men who took an unlikely animal from neglect to acclaim as a four-legged hero of the Depression.
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 20, 2007
For those who would rather spend this afternoon in their television rooms than the Preakness infield, here are five movies centered on horse racing that should get you in the mood for the big race. Tacked on to the end are two more films that, though unavailable on DVD or tape and rarely seen, sound worth the hunt. A Day at the Races (directed by Sam Wood, 1937): The Marx Brothers are unleashed at the racetrack, but only so they can raise enough money to save a sanitarium owned by the lovely Maureen O'Sullivan (five years removed from her first stint as Jane to Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan)
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 25, 2000
An air of rumpled desperation suffuses "Wonder Boys," as if human emotion were muffled under cottony layers of denial and angst, flailing to get out. A story of midlife crisis, creative paralysis and the liberating power of conscious choice, "Wonder Boys" exists in that mid-range between an arty small film and a star-driven Hollywood vehicle. It's that rare, thoroughly satisfying comedy that modestly reaches toward mature filmgoers, counting on their wry recognition of its chastened tone and graying pop references (Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Neil Young)
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 19, 2007
For those who would rather spend this afternoon in their television rooms than the Preakness infield, here are five movies centered on horse racing that should get you in the mood for the big race. Tacked on to the end are two more films that, though unavailable on DVD or tape and rarely seen, sound worth the hunt. AT THE MOVIES A Day at the Races (directed by Sam Wood, 1937): The Marx Brothers are unleashed at the racetrack, but only so they can raise enough money to save a sanitarium owned by the lovely Maureen O'Sullivan (five years removed from her first stint as Jane to Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan)
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 20, 2007
For those who would rather spend this afternoon in their television rooms than the Preakness infield, here are five movies centered on horse racing that should get you in the mood for the big race. Tacked on to the end are two more films that, though unavailable on DVD or tape and rarely seen, sound worth the hunt. A Day at the Races (directed by Sam Wood, 1937): The Marx Brothers are unleashed at the racetrack, but only so they can raise enough money to save a sanitarium owned by the lovely Maureen O'Sullivan (five years removed from her first stint as Jane to Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan)
FEATURES
By Courtney Pomeroy and Courtney Pomeroy,Sun reporter | July 18, 2008
The Little Italy Open Air Film Festival continues its weekly outdoor movie screenings tonight with Seabiscuit. Red Pollard - Tobey Maguire's first major film role after starring in Spider-Man - is a Depression-era jockey with a broken spirit who finds hope through his exceptional horse, Seabiscuit. One of Seabiscuit's most memorable and inspiring races in the film takes place at Pimlico Race Course. This historical, inspirational and Oscar-nominated movie will be playing at 9 p.m. at High and Stiles streets.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2003
Maryland racing shifts to the quaint Timonium track today for the annual meeting held in conjunction with the state fair. For the third straight year, the stand will be limited to eight programs, the outgrowth of cutbacks in purse subsidies, and will feature only two stakes offering $50,000 each to Maryland-bred horses. Live racing will not be conducted Monday or Tuesday at a meet that concludes on Labor Day, but simulcast betting will be available at the track. Post time is 1 p.m. daily.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moran and Paul Moran,Newsday | July 20, 2003
Life was never this good when the horse known as I Two Step Too earned his oats running in races as far from the bright lights and big city as a thoroughbred racehorse gets. After all those years in the company of other four-legged broken dreams, reminded each time he would race in places like Boise, Stampede Park and the Montana State Fair that he was, as they say, "not much stock," his luck had taken a sudden turn for the better. Only last summer, he was slugging it out regularly, running hard, not fast, for small money at Les Bois Park in Idaho, and up for sale each time he ran. Then suddenly, I Two Step Too was a movie star on location, traveling first-class to Kentucky and Hollywood.
SPORTS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 19, 2007
For those who would rather spend this afternoon in their television rooms than the Preakness infield, here are five movies centered on horse racing that should get you in the mood for the big race. Tacked on to the end are two more films that, though unavailable on DVD or tape and rarely seen, sound worth the hunt. AT THE MOVIES A Day at the Races (directed by Sam Wood, 1937): The Marx Brothers are unleashed at the racetrack, but only so they can raise enough money to save a sanitarium owned by the lovely Maureen O'Sullivan (five years removed from her first stint as Jane to Johnny Weissmuller's Tarzan)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 30, 2004
SUN SCORE **** Spider-Man 2 is a comic-book film with the soul and tang of a funny-sad first-love story. The dazzling visuals and special-effects cohere into a stirring and sometimes hilarious romantic adventure that pits two bereft males against each other and dots the screen with wounded hearts. Spider-Man, aka Peter Parker (Tobey Maguire), decides he can never consummate his passion for Mary Jane Watson (Kirsten Dunst) because he endangers everyone who gets close to him. Dr. Otto Octavius (Alfred Molina)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eleanor R. Gillespie and Eleanor R. Gillespie,COX NEWS SERVICE | December 25, 2003
There's an old saying in horse racing: Breed the best to the best and hope for the best. That's exactly what director Gary Ross does with Seabiscuit. He's taken a trio of superb actors - Tobey Maguire, Jeff Bridges, Chris Cooper - and Laura Hillenbrand's thrillingly good best seller and melded them into a graceful, intelligent and heartfelt film. Right from the beginning, Ross lets us know this is not going to be just another maverick-stallion-finds-love-and-wins-th e-Big-Race story. Seabiscuit himself ( several horses, but Fighting Ferrari in close-ups)
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2003
Maryland racing shifts to the quaint Timonium track today for the annual meeting held in conjunction with the state fair. For the third straight year, the stand will be limited to eight programs, the outgrowth of cutbacks in purse subsidies, and will feature only two stakes offering $50,000 each to Maryland-bred horses. Live racing will not be conducted Monday or Tuesday at a meet that concludes on Labor Day, but simulcast betting will be available at the track. Post time is 1 p.m. daily.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nine days before Seabiscuit's national debut, filmmaker Gary Ross, who previously wrote the hit comedies Big and Dave and wrote and directed the subversive fantasy Pleasantville, sat in a D.C. cafe and said: "Sometimes we give ourselves a little too much credit for the way things are rendered. Sometimes what gives our work its impact are the facts and power of the story." (The movie opens across the country Friday and receives its Maryland premiere tonight at the Senator, in a sold-out benefit for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Maryland Horse Industry Foundation.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 23, 2003
In an era when "crowd-pleasing" has become a disparaging term because of smash hits content to push sadistic or sentimental buttons, Seabiscuit dares to be great. This adaptation of Laura Hillenbrand's nonfiction best seller will move large audiences to applause and tears while deepening their feelings for the mysteries of character, the majesty of athletics and the thrill of our democratic culture at its best, when figures from nowhere become true popular champions. Boldly echoing the trajectory of the legendary racehorse who learned how to channel his herky-jerky energy into a fierce and indomitable running style, the movie starts out with an unusual gait, cutting among the individual stories of three men who took an unlikely animal from neglect to acclaim as a four-legged hero of the Depression.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Somewhere amid the muffled rustling of popcorn and surreptitious slurps of soda, a revolution is under way. In the new movie Tadpole, a 15-year-old boy falls for his 40-something stepmother. In the forthcoming The Good Girl, Jennifer Aniston is 30 and hooks up with a 22-year-old. The recent flush of films that explore the same theme have included Lovely and Amazing (36-year-old woman and 17-year-old boy) and Crush (40-something woman and 25-year-old former student). Offscreen, Sandra Bullock (37)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - Nine days before Seabiscuit's national debut, filmmaker Gary Ross, who previously wrote the hit comedies Big and Dave and wrote and directed the subversive fantasy Pleasantville, sat in a D.C. cafe and said: "Sometimes we give ourselves a little too much credit for the way things are rendered. Sometimes what gives our work its impact are the facts and power of the story." (The movie opens across the country Friday and receives its Maryland premiere tonight at the Senator, in a sold-out benefit for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the Maryland Horse Industry Foundation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Moran and Paul Moran,Newsday | July 20, 2003
Life was never this good when the horse known as I Two Step Too earned his oats running in races as far from the bright lights and big city as a thoroughbred racehorse gets. After all those years in the company of other four-legged broken dreams, reminded each time he would race in places like Boise, Stampede Park and the Montana State Fair that he was, as they say, "not much stock," his luck had taken a sudden turn for the better. Only last summer, he was slugging it out regularly, running hard, not fast, for small money at Les Bois Park in Idaho, and up for sale each time he ran. Then suddenly, I Two Step Too was a movie star on location, traveling first-class to Kentucky and Hollywood.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | July 27, 2002
Somewhere amid the muffled rustling of popcorn and surreptitious slurps of soda, a revolution is under way. In the new movie Tadpole, a 15-year-old boy falls for his 40-something stepmother. In the forthcoming The Good Girl, Jennifer Aniston is 30 and hooks up with a 22-year-old. The recent flush of films that explore the same theme have included Lovely and Amazing (36-year-old woman and 17-year-old boy) and Crush (40-something woman and 25-year-old former student). Offscreen, Sandra Bullock (37)
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