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Tobacco Smoke

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NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2007
The air in smoky Baltimore bars presents a far greater risk to the health of patrons and workers than that of smoke-free establishments, according to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Tobacco smoke in city bars produced airborne particle levels 10 times higher on average than the Environmental Protection Agency considers safe for outdoor air, the study found. By contrast, the air in nonsmoking bars contained about the same particle levels as outdoor air and at least 90 percent less harmful particulate matter than the air in smoking bars.
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NEWS
June 15, 2014
Whether the air quality in a hookah lounge is outstandingly fresh or alarmingly toxic, the real benefit to those who use these facilities is they can continue their lifestyle without endangering us ( "Study discovers poor air quality in hookah lounges," June 12). We have to suffer toxic smoke fumes every time we go outdoors in Baltimore. What good would a study do anyway? We know unquestionably that tobacco smoke along with secondhand smoke makes the user and the bystander eventually suffer a premature, agonizing and slow death.
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NEWS
June 15, 2014
Whether the air quality in a hookah lounge is outstandingly fresh or alarmingly toxic, the real benefit to those who use these facilities is they can continue their lifestyle without endangering us ( "Study discovers poor air quality in hookah lounges," June 12). We have to suffer toxic smoke fumes every time we go outdoors in Baltimore. What good would a study do anyway? We know unquestionably that tobacco smoke along with secondhand smoke makes the user and the bystander eventually suffer a premature, agonizing and slow death.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
Lighting up a cigarette on playgrounds, athletic fields and other areas in public parks could draw a $50 fine in Baltimore County and $500 in the city under legislation being considered in those jurisdictions. Supporters of bans on tobacco use say establishing no-smoking zones in public parks would protect children from secondhand smoke. Baltimore City Councilman William H. Cole IV introduced legislation last month after constituents complained about smoking at Latrobe Park in Locust Point.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | October 7, 1992
BOSTON -- Researchers at the Harvard University School of Public Health are reporting today the first evidence that tobacco smoke in the environment creates potentially precancerous changes in the lungs of non-smokers.While previous studies have found an increased risk of lung cancer among non-smokers who lived with smokers, the new report is the first to find actual damage in the lungs of passive smokers and strengthens the causal link.The study, published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association, relied on autopsy examinations of women who had died from causes not related to smoking or respiratory diseases.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | September 7, 2003
Pipe-smoking has not drawn quite as much attention among health researchers as cigarette-smoking or even cigar-smoking, perhaps because the practice involves so many fewer people. What studies there are suggest pipes are probably not as hazardous as cigarettes, but more risky than not smoking at all. However enticing its aroma may be, pipe tobacco smoke is still tobacco smoke, which contains chemicals that have been found to cause various cancers. What argument remains concerns how these chemicals affect people, and the different risks associated with different ways of using tobacco.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
Lloyd Edwards is not a smoker, but he works around smokers almost constantly at the Phoenix Emporium in Historic Ellicott City. The bartender said he knows secondhand smoke is unhealthy for him but that he isn't worried."
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2001
Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan reversed course yesterday and vetoed a bill that would have barred county residents from lighting up a cigarette at home if the smoke threatened a neighbor's health. Defeating the measure, which placed cigarette smoke on a par with indoor air pollutants such as radon and mold, had become a cause celebre for tobacco companies and conservative commentators. ABC-TV commentator George Will said the County Council overreached its authority, and editorials deriding the measure appeared as far away as western Canada.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 16, 2014
Just in case you hadn't heard, smoking is bad for you. From a certain perspective, it doesn't seem as though it needs to be repeated, but given Harford County's increasing rate of lung cancer, and the association of that deadly ailment with inhaling tobacco smoke, it seems like there might be an unusually high number of people in our readership area who are unaware. Coincidental or otherwise, the report from the Harford County Health Department about the problem of local lung cancer rates increasing, even as statewide rates are declining, came out within days of the 50th anniversary of the first U.S. Surgeon General report warning about the ill effects of smoking.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The tobacco industry began what is expected to be a vigorous counterattack against the government assault on smoking yesterday as R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. launched a public relations campaign to "bring some balance to the debate surrounding secondhand smoke and other issues surrounding cigarettes."In full-page advertisements in major U.S. newspapers, the company claimed that non-smokers are routinely exposed to "very little" secondhand smoke.The ads claimed that, in a month, a non-smoker living with a smoker would be exposed to environmental smoke that was, on average, the equivalent of smoking 1 1/2 cigarettes.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 16, 2014
Just in case you hadn't heard, smoking is bad for you. From a certain perspective, it doesn't seem as though it needs to be repeated, but given Harford County's increasing rate of lung cancer, and the association of that deadly ailment with inhaling tobacco smoke, it seems like there might be an unusually high number of people in our readership area who are unaware. Coincidental or otherwise, the report from the Harford County Health Department about the problem of local lung cancer rates increasing, even as statewide rates are declining, came out within days of the 50th anniversary of the first U.S. Surgeon General report warning about the ill effects of smoking.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | February 25, 2013
Coleen Deems sat down after every Ravens season and wrote a letter to the team, asking it to ban smoking at the stadium. This year, when her 10-year-old grandson looked up and said, “I have to hold my breath,” while walking past a designated smoking area at M&T Bank Stadium, the 11-year season-ticket holder became more determined and considered tracking down the personal email address of team owner Steve Bisciotti. She didn't have to, and the Ravens won't need to decide how to deal with the divisive issue.
NEWS
January 25, 2012
In response to the recent letter defending smokeless tobacco use ("All tobacco products are not equally harmful," Jan. 24), the risk of tobacco trumps all others. Fifty cigarettes a day increases the risk of end-stage lung disease and lung cancer 150-fold. This is orders of magnitude worse than other modifiable risk factors like weight, aerobic capacity blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose level. Even if smokeless tobacco is responsible for only 2 percent of tobacco deaths, we cannot accept thousands of deaths instead of over 450,000 deaths a year in America.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,SUN REPORTER | February 27, 2007
The air in smoky Baltimore bars presents a far greater risk to the health of patrons and workers than that of smoke-free establishments, according to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Tobacco smoke in city bars produced airborne particle levels 10 times higher on average than the Environmental Protection Agency considers safe for outdoor air, the study found. By contrast, the air in nonsmoking bars contained about the same particle levels as outdoor air and at least 90 percent less harmful particulate matter than the air in smoking bars.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY and JONATHAN BOR, JOHN FRITZE AND STEPHANIE BEASLEY,SUN REPORTERS | June 28, 2006
As states and localities debate smoking bans, U.S. Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona declared yesterday that secondhand smoke triggers diseases that include lung cancer and sudden infant death syndrome -- and that no level is safe. "Science has proven that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke," Carmona said at a Washington news conference, summing up a 709-page report that is the surgeon general's office's first assessment of the risks in two decades. While former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said in 1986 that exposure to other people's tobacco smoke can trigger lung cancer, Carmona added several other diseases.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | September 7, 2003
Pipe-smoking has not drawn quite as much attention among health researchers as cigarette-smoking or even cigar-smoking, perhaps because the practice involves so many fewer people. What studies there are suggest pipes are probably not as hazardous as cigarettes, but more risky than not smoking at all. However enticing its aroma may be, pipe tobacco smoke is still tobacco smoke, which contains chemicals that have been found to cause various cancers. What argument remains concerns how these chemicals affect people, and the different risks associated with different ways of using tobacco.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 1997
MIAMI -- Lawyers for the tobacco industry and 60,000 U.S. flight attendants are girding for the start this week of a trial that will test the industry's liability for illnesses supposedly caused by secondhand smoke.The case, known as Broin vs. Philip Morris, is the first to seek damages for bystanders supposedly harmed by smoke from other people's cigarettes. It will also be the first tobacco case of any kind tried on behalf of a whole class of plaintiffs, where an industry defeat could bring damages in the billions of dollars.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | December 4, 1994
Talbot County's tough smoking law was passed to protect people from fumes streaming off other people's cigarettes. But what is the hazard? Is it death, illness or mere annoyance?Ask the Environmental Protection Agency or the American Heart Association and you will hear that secondhand smoke not only makes people ill, but causes thousands of fatal lung cancers and heart attacks that wouldn't have occurred in a smoke-free environment.Ask the tobacco industry, and you will hear that the EPA has engaged in pseudo-science, skewing its research to reach the politically correct conclusion that cigarette smoke is lethal even for nonsmokers.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2001
Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan reversed course yesterday and vetoed a bill that would have barred county residents from lighting up a cigarette at home if the smoke threatened a neighbor's health. Defeating the measure, which placed cigarette smoke on a par with indoor air pollutants such as radon and mold, had become a cause celebre for tobacco companies and conservative commentators. ABC-TV commentator George Will said the County Council overreached its authority, and editorials deriding the measure appeared as far away as western Canada.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 22, 2001
PHILADELPHIA -- The push to limit smoking in public places has led to a 75 percent drop in the blood levels of a tobacco-linked carcinogen in the American population. The decline since 1991 marks a "dramatic reduction in exposure" to environmental tobacco smoke, according to officials at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "It shows that the national effort to provide clean indoor air ... is working," said Terry Pechack, of the CDC Office of Smoking and Health. The finding was the most striking in the CDC's first comprehensive evaluation of human exposure to dangerous chemicals.
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