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Tobacco Road

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NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Sun Staff Writer | January 26, 1995
Interstate 95 was sometimes called Tobacco Road in years past as police and tax agents arrested smugglers hauling untaxed cigarettes from North Carolina to the Northeast. A more appropriate name now might be Drug Highway.Once on Monday and three times Tuesday, Maryland state troopers stopping southbound cars for traffic offenses reported finding cocaine or heroin hidden in the vehicles.Such discoveries have become common occurrences on I-95.The biggest haul this week was more than 3 pounds of cocaine found in a hidden compartment behind the rear seat of a car that was clocked at 80.7 mph and stopped by Tfc. John Greene near Aberdeen Tuesday, police said.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
On a brisk afternoon 50 years ago, Timothy Hyman snapped pictures as officials cut a ribbon to open the newest stretch of Interstate 95, connecting Baltimore to Delaware and onward north to Maine. Amid the large crowd gathered at the Maryland-Delaware border, Hyman still remembers the civil rights advocates picketing just outside his frame, calling for the interstate to be interracial and to further advance their cause. In that moment, Hyman said he saw a dual promise - of travel without congestion, but also without oppression.
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | March 17, 2008
DURHAM, N.C.-- --Interstate 40 stretches from California to North Carolina. You could say it's like an asphalt belt wrapping around the country's midsection, but I look at a small stretch of it and see something different. From Durham to Memphis, Tenn., I-40 is lined with tradition-rich basketball universities, their logos and mascots dangling off the freeway like charms on a bracelet. Blue Devils, Tar Heels, Wildcats, Bulldogs, Tigers and several more. My journey - which will measure 750 miles before I'm finished and should cross paths with not only some of the nation's top teams, but also some of its most unique characters, programs and fan bases - begins off Ninth Street.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013
  Baltimore Sun reporter Don Markus and editor Matt Bracken weigh in on the three biggest topics of the past week in Maryland sports. Is the Atlantic Coast Conference being vindictive with Maryland regarding its basketball schedule for its final season? Don Markus: After seeing that the Terps have to go play at Duke and North Carolina, without a return game from either the Blue Devils or Tar Heels, my reaction was it was a, uh, going-away gift for leaving for the Big Ten in 2014.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
There's no shortage of quality big men among the Atlantic Coast Conference's four North Carolina schools. Duke's Shelden Williams leads that pack. If the conference has one beast who can bump Williams off the block, it's Wake Forest's Eric Williams. North Carolina is getting great mileage from 6-foot-9, 235-pound Tyler Hansbrough, who leads the Tar Heels and all ACC freshmen in scoring, rebounding and field-goal percentage. Hansbrough is not considered the best NBA prospect among rookies on Route 15/501; 6-10 Josh McRoberts can play with his back to the basket and help out on perimeter traps for the Blue Devils.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
RALEIGH, N.C. - Maryland at Wake Forest, Georgia Tech at North Carolina, then Duke at North Carolina State last night. Observations and thoughts after watching four of the nation's top eight ranked teams in the span of 48 hours, and eating too many hush puppies at Bullock's, the Durham barbecue joint: Those who didn't predict No. 3 North Carolina to win the national championship underestimated Roy Williams' ability to turn a team that was selfish in...
NEWS
By Chris Goodrich and Chris Goodrich,LA Times | April 2, 1995
"Erskine Caldwell: The Journey From Tobacco Road," by Dan B. Miller. 459 pages. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. $30"Erskine Caldwell has performed "One of the greatest disappearing acts in our literary history," writes Dan Miller in the preface to this biography. As late as the early '60s, as his paperback publisher loved to proclaim, he was "The World's Best-Selling Author!" Today he's little more than an academic footnote, known mainly for his earliest novels, "Tobacco Road" and "God's Little Acre.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 9, 2005
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - Isn't April supposed to be the cruelest month? Someone ought to tell that to January, since it was here, in this very nascent month of the ACC season, that an entire conference schedule for Maryland was so abruptly and thoroughly cast in stormy weather. If you play in the ACC, you have no choice. You run with the big dogs of college basketball day after day. Or, in the case of playing North Carolina, you sprint with the big dogs wearing powder blue, and you do it until your legs are dead and your spirit isn't far behind.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 19, 2006
I didn't necessarily make resolutions for 2006. I didn't curl up with a pen and a journal, reflecting on the last 365 days of my life while jotting down promises I know I'm not gonna keep. I just woke up the morning after a nice New Year's Eve party (slightly hung over, of course) and started doing different stuff. Like tidying up my apartment, something I seemingly never did last year. And two weeks ago, I started visiting the fitness room at my apartment complex. There's this big, nifty thing I've been using in there called the treadmill.
NEWS
By Gil Crandall and Gil Crandall,Contributing writer | September 27, 1990
When Fred Romer, a longtime resident of Edgewater, decided to retire from New Jersey-based Lockheed Electronics, he had not the slightest intention of retiring in the usual sense.In 1973, at age 55, Romer was not yet ready to roll down his sleeves and bid goodbye to the world of business. Instead, like so many other older Americans, he embarked on a second career.While Romer, 72, admits to enjoying golf and boating, and is an active Elk and a key member of the Annapolis Council of the Navy League, he was not prepared to spend the rest of his mornings knocking a ball around a golf course and napping away his afternoons.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
The University of Maryland's planned departure from the Atlantic Coast Conference has raised questions about the league's long-term survival, a sobering prospect for fans that grew up on games between the Terps and their Tobacco Road rivals. The first notes of panic emerged Monday, after Maryland announced plans to leave for the Big Ten and its far greater television riches in 2014. "I think the ACC is vulnerable right now," said Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski in taping his show Basketball and Beyond for Sirius XM Radio.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | March 17, 2008
DURHAM, N.C.-- --Interstate 40 stretches from California to North Carolina. You could say it's like an asphalt belt wrapping around the country's midsection, but I look at a small stretch of it and see something different. From Durham to Memphis, Tenn., I-40 is lined with tradition-rich basketball universities, their logos and mascots dangling off the freeway like charms on a bracelet. Blue Devils, Tar Heels, Wildcats, Bulldogs, Tigers and several more. My journey - which will measure 750 miles before I'm finished and should cross paths with not only some of the nation's top teams, but also some of its most unique characters, programs and fan bases - begins off Ninth Street.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | March 2, 2008
UCLA was the opponent, and the University of Oregon student section was trying desperately, as it always does, to get inside the heads of opposing basketball players. But on this January night, the McArthur Court "Pit Crew" took it further than usual - crossing from zany and clever to vicious and crass - as it rained profanities on the Bruins and their freshman center, Kevin Love, and taunted his family. The yellow-clad Pit Crew is far from the only rooting section guilty of over-the-top behavior in the past year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | January 19, 2006
I didn't necessarily make resolutions for 2006. I didn't curl up with a pen and a journal, reflecting on the last 365 days of my life while jotting down promises I know I'm not gonna keep. I just woke up the morning after a nice New Year's Eve party (slightly hung over, of course) and started doing different stuff. Like tidying up my apartment, something I seemingly never did last year. And two weeks ago, I started visiting the fitness room at my apartment complex. There's this big, nifty thing I've been using in there called the treadmill.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | December 14, 2005
There's no shortage of quality big men among the Atlantic Coast Conference's four North Carolina schools. Duke's Shelden Williams leads that pack. If the conference has one beast who can bump Williams off the block, it's Wake Forest's Eric Williams. North Carolina is getting great mileage from 6-foot-9, 235-pound Tyler Hansbrough, who leads the Tar Heels and all ACC freshmen in scoring, rebounding and field-goal percentage. Hansbrough is not considered the best NBA prospect among rookies on Route 15/501; 6-10 Josh McRoberts can play with his back to the basket and help out on perimeter traps for the Blue Devils.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2005
UPPER MARLBORO - The tobacco thriving here on the University of Maryland's research farm looks like the plant that dominated state agriculture for centuries, the leaves mint green, fuzzy to the touch, long and wide as the blades of a ceiling fan. These plants have been to college, though, and might be nearing the threshold of a future that generations of tobacco farmers would scarcely recognize. For one thing, this vision of Maryland tobacco's future is stamped "NO SMOKING." Think, instead, of tobacco as a component of cosmetics, diet supplements, medicine or shampoo.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun Reporter | March 2, 2008
UCLA was the opponent, and the University of Oregon student section was trying desperately, as it always does, to get inside the heads of opposing basketball players. But on this January night, the McArthur Court "Pit Crew" took it further than usual - crossing from zany and clever to vicious and crass - as it rained profanities on the Bruins and their freshman center, Kevin Love, and taunted his family. The yellow-clad Pit Crew is far from the only rooting section guilty of over-the-top behavior in the past year.
SPORTS
April 26, 2013
  Baltimore Sun reporter Don Markus and editor Matt Bracken weigh in on the three biggest topics of the past week in Maryland sports. Is the Atlantic Coast Conference being vindictive with Maryland regarding its basketball schedule for its final season? Don Markus: After seeing that the Terps have to go play at Duke and North Carolina, without a return game from either the Blue Devils or Tar Heels, my reaction was it was a, uh, going-away gift for leaving for the Big Ten in 2014.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
RALEIGH, N.C. - Maryland at Wake Forest, Georgia Tech at North Carolina, then Duke at North Carolina State last night. Observations and thoughts after watching four of the nation's top eight ranked teams in the span of 48 hours, and eating too many hush puppies at Bullock's, the Durham barbecue joint: Those who didn't predict No. 3 North Carolina to win the national championship underestimated Roy Williams' ability to turn a team that was selfish in...
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 9, 2005
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - Isn't April supposed to be the cruelest month? Someone ought to tell that to January, since it was here, in this very nascent month of the ACC season, that an entire conference schedule for Maryland was so abruptly and thoroughly cast in stormy weather. If you play in the ACC, you have no choice. You run with the big dogs of college basketball day after day. Or, in the case of playing North Carolina, you sprint with the big dogs wearing powder blue, and you do it until your legs are dead and your spirit isn't far behind.
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