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NEWS
February 27, 1993
The debate over cigarette smoking in public places has shifted from a quarrel over individual rights to a sharper focus on the effects of secondhand smoke on health and children. It is a shift that puts the tobacco industry on a slippery slope the industry desperately wanted to avoid.Cigarette-makers wanted the dispute to center on whether government should intrude in the private habits of citizens. The tobacco lobby waved the Stars and Stripes and painted itself as a freedom fighter for the tar and nicotine set. (No taxation without asphyxiation?
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NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH and C. FRASER SMITH,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
After years of supremacy in the General Assembly, lobbyists for the Goliath of Big Tobacco could be felled this year by the David of grass-roots opposition.Anti-tobacco forces want a $1 increase in the tax imposed on every package of cigarettes, asserting that higher prices will take vulnerable teen-agers out of the smokers market.The argument is not a new one for legislators. But the power relationship has changed enough to make passage of a tax increase likely, though it may be less than $1.Supporters have been turned back with nothing in the past, so even a 50-cent boost would be a breakthrough.
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FEATURES
By Linnea Lannon and Linnea Lannon,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 2, 1994
Timing is everything. And, boy, Christopher Buckley could not have asked for better timing.Mr. Buckley -- he's the son of William -- is the author of "Thank You for Smoking," a satire of the tobacco lobby. This is tricky terrain because, as recent congressional testimony suggests, it's hard to make these people appear more inane than they make themselves appear.But Mr. Buckley pretty much succeeds. Actually, he succeeds at ridiculing all sides of the smoking "issue" and all of Washington, from the Mod (Merchants of Death)
NEWS
By J. Joseph Curran Jr | March 11, 1998
AN army of lobbyists (14 at last count) has amassed in Annapolis because I have introduced legislation in the General Assembly (Senate Bill 652 and House Bill 972) that they say "targets" the tobacco industry.My bill does target this industry; it would strengthen Maryland's lawsuit against cigarette manufacturers to recoup past Medicaid costs by clarifying that the state does not have to drag every smoker before a court to prove he or she suffers from a smoking-related illness. A court ruling has left the state in this untenable position.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | May 13, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- It was the state's long-awaited counterattack, a $3 million public relations war against smoking and other behaviors that have helped give Maryland the worst cancer rate in the nation.Fighting cancer is one of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's top priorities. His administration fought the legislature and the tobacco lobby to get the money for the campaign and won. The state was ready to sign up an ad agency to begin the three-year media blitz.Then someone read the fine print on the budget bill.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | May 13, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- It was the state's long-awaited counterattack, a $3 million public relations war against smoking and other behaviors that have helped give Maryland the worst cancer rate in the nation.Fighting cancer is one of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's top priorities. His administration fought the legislature and the tobacco lobby to get the money for the campaign and won. The state was ready to sign up an ad agency to begin the three-year media blitz.Then someone read the fine print on the budget bill.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | March 27, 1993
Legislation to stiffen penalties for selling tobacco products to minors failed yesterday when supporters and opponents in the House joined forces to kill the bill, at least temporarily. The vote of 67-59 fell four votes short of the constitutional requirement for passage. Minutes later, lawmakers rallied and were able to get the House to reconsider the bill on Monday.Opponents argued that the measure was too harsh, raisin penalties from $100 to $1,000 for a first offense of selling tobacco products to minors.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1994
State Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said yesterday that his office will help Howard County's legal staff defend against a $1.5 million lawsuit filed against the county by a powerful tobacco lobbyist.Bruce C. Bereano, a lobbyist for the Tobacco Institute, filed the suit yesterday morning in Howard Circuit Court after the County Council voted 4-1 Monday night to urge local businesses to get rid of cigarette vending machines, especially those that are accessible to minors."We feel the tobacco lobby people are very wrong on this issue," Mr. Curran said.
NEWS
February 10, 1993
The County Council is scheduled to hear public testimony tonight on Councilwoman Maureen Lamb's bill to restrict smoking in restaurants, offices and other public places.Under the bill, smoking in public areas would be limited to a closed-off room or separate area designated by a business owner or employer. Public places affected by the bill include banks, cafeterias, classrooms, health care facilities, public areas of hotels and motels, public meeting rooms, restrooms, theaters and other entertainment halls, and stores employing more than eight people.
NEWS
July 7, 1996
WARNING TO BOB DOLE: Tobacco may be hazardous to the health of your presidential campaign. In continuing to say that smoking is not addictive to everyone, you have become the butt of the Buttman joke. Democrats costumed like cigarettes cavort at your public appearances. Reporters keep asking questions about contributions from the tobacco lobby. And even Republicans are wondering if all those years on Capitol Hill have given you a bad case of tin ear.ADVICE TO BOB DOLE: Stop it. This issue is a loser.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | October 10, 1997
THOSE WHO DECIDE to run with the hounds have no complaint when they catch fleas, and those who think they can strike happy bargains in the public interest with tobacco companies ought to expect to get fleeced.This is the lesson being learned as Congress, the president and the attorneys general of 39 states and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico dither about whether to go ahead with a $368.5 billion settlement. It's offered as a sort of weird treaty by which the Tobacco Republic agrees to become America's staunch ally against the evil of smoking.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Mississippi Attorney General Michael Moore outlined the landmark settlement between his fellow state officials and Big Tobacco this summer, he boasted that the Tobacco Institute, the industry's powerful lobbying and public relations arm, would be "destroyed."Moore said the institute, a longtime nemesis of the anti-smoking community, had contributed to the "culture of deceit" within the tobacco industry that "has caused the death of so many people in this country."But friends and foes of the tobacco industry say that, as with many Washington handshakes entangled in money and politics, there may be less here than meets the eye. The settlement provision that calls for dissolving the 39-year-old Tobacco Institute and its sister trade organization, the Council on Tobacco Research, is more symbolic than substantive, they say.That's because under the agreement, the tobacco industry can simply form a new lobbying group or trade association.
NEWS
July 7, 1996
WARNING TO BOB DOLE: Tobacco may be hazardous to the health of your presidential campaign. In continuing to say that smoking is not addictive to everyone, you have become the butt of the Buttman joke. Democrats costumed like cigarettes cavort at your public appearances. Reporters keep asking questions about contributions from the tobacco lobby. And even Republicans are wondering if all those years on Capitol Hill have given you a bad case of tin ear.ADVICE TO BOB DOLE: Stop it. This issue is a loser.
NEWS
March 29, 1995
Maryland now has one of the toughest workplace smoking bans in the nation. It's got loopholes, though -- big loopholes. But in the world of politics and lawmaking, there's no such thing as a perfect bill. Compromises must be made. To take an unyielding stand can lead to crushing defeat.Such is the case with the no-smoking bill signed into law Monday night by Gov. Parris N. Glendening. Sure, the governor settled for far less than he initially sought. But had he refused to yield he would have been run over by a fast-charging legislative locomotive -- stoked by the powerful tobacco lobby -- determined to carve out even bigger exemptions in the no-smoking ban.In the end, Mr. Glendening rightly could claim victory.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | March 22, 1995
Maryland was very nearly, just about everywhere-that-really-counted, smoke-free.Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed.Now, apparently, thanks to the brave stand taken by the state legislature, you can't smoke in the office or at the mall, but you'll still be able to smoke in a bar. In a hotel lobby. In a bowling alley. In other words, in all the places that make life worth living.The legislators said they were doing this not to protect smokers or because the tobacco lobby (cigarettes don't kill; lung cancer does)
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The undisputed champion of scare tactics among political lobbies used to be the National Rifle Association. Its advertising and its propagandists were successful for years using the one-two punch of heavy contributions to members of Congress who opposed gun control and newspaper and television ads distorting what gun control legislation proposed.The NRA peddled the notion that practically any legislation offered would open the door to the government "taking away your guns" in violation of the Second Amendment's "right to bear arms."
NEWS
February 9, 1992
Maryland's No. 1 -- in cancer. Yes, the highest incidence of this often fatal disease in the 50 states is found right here. In an important sub-category, Maryland ranks No. 5 in terms of lung cancer, a form of the disease that can be traced to cigarette smoking 80 to 90 percent of the time.What's the tobacco lobby's response in Annapolis? To parade a ludicrous "smokers' rights bill" before legislators, hiring some of the most expensive and prestigious ex-legislators and lobbyists to throw up a smoke screen that masks the true intent of the legislation -- all this, to kill the Schaefer administration's efforts to crack down on smoking and to raise the cigarette tax.Maryland's No. 1 cancer ranking for 1992, from the American Cancer Society, highlights why Gov. William Donald Schaefer is so intent on pursuing his anti-smoking measures.
NEWS
By J. Joseph Curran Jr | March 11, 1998
AN army of lobbyists (14 at last count) has amassed in Annapolis because I have introduced legislation in the General Assembly (Senate Bill 652 and House Bill 972) that they say "targets" the tobacco industry.My bill does target this industry; it would strengthen Maryland's lawsuit against cigarette manufacturers to recoup past Medicaid costs by clarifying that the state does not have to drag every smoker before a court to prove he or she suffers from a smoking-related illness. A court ruling has left the state in this untenable position.
FEATURES
By Linnea Lannon and Linnea Lannon,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 2, 1994
Timing is everything. And, boy, Christopher Buckley could not have asked for better timing.Mr. Buckley -- he's the son of William -- is the author of "Thank You for Smoking," a satire of the tobacco lobby. This is tricky terrain because, as recent congressional testimony suggests, it's hard to make these people appear more inane than they make themselves appear.But Mr. Buckley pretty much succeeds. Actually, he succeeds at ridiculing all sides of the smoking "issue" and all of Washington, from the Mod (Merchants of Death)
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | May 4, 1994
State Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said yesterday that his office will help Howard County's legal staff defend against a $1.5 million lawsuit filed against the county by a powerful tobacco lobbyist.Bruce C. Bereano, a lobbyist for the Tobacco Institute, filed the suit yesterday morning in Howard Circuit Court after the County Council voted 4-1 Monday night to urge local businesses to get rid of cigarette vending machines, especially those that are accessible to minors."We feel the tobacco lobby people are very wrong on this issue," Mr. Curran said.
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