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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 26, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department has convened a grand jury in New York to investigate whether tobacco companies misrepresented to federal regulators the contents and ill effects of cigarettes. The department is likely to convene a second panel here to investigate whether company executives lied to Congress about tobacco products.It is the first time the federal government has moved against tobacco companies or their executives.Investigators at the Justice Department's criminal division in Washington and the Manhattan office of the U.S. attorney have been reviewing industry documents and congressional testimony for some time.
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NEWS
March 3, 2014
I'd like to address some of Michelle Minton's comments directed at the bills aimed to ban energy drinks to minors ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 27). First of all, to say that these bills are "knee jerk legislation based on anecdotal evidence and sensational news headlines" is simply untrue. These drinks not only contain large amounts of caffeine but also contain other ingredients with stimulant properties. Also, let's clarify that the caffeine listed on cans of energy drinks is a food additive.
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NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | March 3, 1991
Influential tobacco industry lobbyist Bruce Bereano includes Delegate Donald B. Elliott, R-Carroll, Howard, among those he refers to as the "health police" -- legislators and activists imposing their ideas of clean living on others.Elliott told the House Environmental Matters Committee Wednesday that he prefers instead to consider himselfa "health crusader" and implored the panel to support his bill aimedat protecting the health of non-smokers by requiring supervisors of public places to designate smoking and non-smoking areas.
NEWS
January 19, 2012
Over the past decade, Maryland has gradually raised its tax on cigarettes to the current $2 per pack, and the results have been striking. Fewer people smoke cigarettes today than before the tax was implemented, and that's particularly true among high school students. Yet even as lawmakers acted boldly to reduce cigarette use, they foolishly left alone other forms of tobacco, chiefly snuff, chewing tobacco and cigars. So while cigarettes and what's known as "OTP" or Other Tobacco Products were taxed at comparable levels in 1999 (36 cents per pack for cigarettes and 15 percent of wholesale prices for OTP)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The tobacco industry has begun an aggressive campaign-donation drive, pouring more than $1.5 million into national Republican Party treasuries in the first half of 1995, five times as much as in the period last year.The surge in donations comes when the industry is facing the most serious threats from Washington in its history.The industry's chief worry comes from the Food and Drug Administration, which is moving to have nicotine declared an addictive drug, a fundamental change in the government's approach to tobacco.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | August 18, 1992
How do you convince kids not to smoke?That's the question of the moment for educators, health activists -- and the tobacco industry.While educators struggle to reduce smoking rates among youth, which is the only segment of U.S. society in which smoking has not declined in the past decade, the tobacco industry is promoting its own anti-smoking program this summer in a 30-city tour punctuated with public service announcements on radio, television and billboards.As...
NEWS
By Peter H. Stone | May 19, 1996
FACING MYRIAD regulatory, legal and tax threats from Washington and the states, the tobacco industry has come out smoking. The industry has substantially boosted its Washington and state lobbying operations while heavily tilting its political contributions to the Republicans.Since the Clinton administration has come into office, the political landscape confronting the $45 billion-a-year tobacco industry has changed for the worse in some critical ways. To discourage smoking among youths, the Food and Drug hTC Administration -- with the White House's blessings -- is getting close to regulating nicotine as a drug.
BUSINESS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Handing the tobacco industry a second defeat within a week in court, the Supreme Court turned aside yesterday a constitutional challenge to a Florida law making it harder for cigarette makers to defend themselves against a still-rising flood of state governments' lawsuits.Nearly two dozen states have sued the industry to recoup billions of dollars paid in medical benefit payments to individuals allegedly harmed by smoking. Maryland is one of the states suing.The Supreme Court's action clears the way for trial in August of .....
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | November 17, 1997
TYLER, Texas -- The tobacco industry has a lot of legal worries these days. But few of them are bigger than a 6-foot-5 physician named Gary L. Huber, who says he was bamboozled by the cigarette companies that financed his research.Now he is prepared to pay them back, and then some.Since August, the lanky, 58-year-old former college basketball player has emerged as that surprisingly rare character: the tobacco industry whistle-blower. Huber has become a central witness in Texas' lawsuit against the tobacco companies, and his quiet life as a diet doctor, health columnist and soccer dad in this town on the edge of the East Texas oil fields has been transformed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 8, 1997
Hundreds of tobacco industry documents divulged in response to a congressional subpoena may provide a broader picture of how cigarette companies marketed products to minors and funneled money through lawyers to finance scientific projects that often played down the risks of smoking.On Friday, four companies, including Philip Morris, the nation's largest cigarette producer, and RJR Nabisco Holdings, the owner of R. J. Reynolds Tobacco, delivered more than 800 documents to the offices of Rep. Thomas J. Bliley Jr., a Virginia Republican.
NEWS
By Carter Beach | April 16, 2010
This year, millions of people will watch the Orioles at Camden Yards or on TV. We can't know whether the O's will win or lose, but there's at least one thing every baseball fan can be sure of witnessing: spit tobacco use. Baseball has always been a numbers game. Fans everywhere know their favorite players' batting averages and earned run averages. Here in Baltimore, the number 2,632 — Cal Ripken's record for consecutive games played — is etched in many minds. Well, how about these numbers?
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris , joseph.burris@baltsun.com | December 5, 2009
Maryland is among several states whose efforts to curb smoking have apparently paid off - even as the nationwide percentage of smokers has stayed constant over the past five years. At about 15 percent, the state has the fourth-lowest percentage of adult smokers in the United States, according to a study released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A similar study released by the agency says that nearly 21 percent of Americans were smokers last year, a number virtually unchanged since 2004.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | January 21, 2007
For nearly 70 years, Southern Maryland tobacco growers have packed up their barn-dried leaf in early spring and taken it to auction. They stacked the leaf on shallow baskets in piles that would reach a farmer's waist, sometimes higher. Growers were careful to place the baskets with their best tobacco - with the thin, cherry-red leaves- at the head of the line. The sale started with the rhythmic chant of the auctioneer in a tongue that few outsiders could understand. As the seller made his way down the long rows of tobacco, a half-dozen buyers would follow.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FU and JENNIFER FU,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | May 5, 2006
Driving in his red pickup truck, Larry Wilson points to a housing development along Route 263 in Calvert County. "I remember that being an open field, and where these houses are, I used to plant tobacco," said Wilson, 54. "When I was a young teenager, I helped my father, and I helped other farmers, and that's how I made money to buy my school clothes and my first car." Wilson's family grew tobacco for four generations, beginning with his grandfather and ending with his 30-year-old son. Remnants of those tobacco days lie inside the dusty gray barn behind Wilson's three-story house in Huntingtown.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
FOR nearly 370 years, tobacco has been more than a crop in Southern Maryland. It has been a way of life. The first European settlers to the region saw the potential of the crop shortly after their ships -- the Ark and the Dove -- landed at St. Clements Island in 1634. They developed a thriving economy around supplying the Old Country's growing demand for smokes. Tobacco was used as currency. The town preacher was paid in tobacco. Tobacco farmers could order a bride from England for 120 pounds of the dried leaf.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY | December 5, 2004
Stock of Altria Group Inc. looks attractive to me. What is the company's outlook? - S.T., via the Internet The giant tobacco and food company formerly known as Philip Morris plans to split into two or three separate companies once there is an easing of tobacco litigation. This would result in an independent Kraft Foods Inc., Philip Morris USA and Philip Morris International, all of which management currently considers to be undervalued. Dividing tobacco interests would protect its international business from U.S. litigation.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 23, 1993
Leading forces of the tobacco industry sued the federal government yesterday to overturn its declaration that secondhand tobacco smoke causes cancer.Groups representing tobacco growers and distributors, as well as the country's two leading cigarette makers, Philip Morris Cos. Inc. and the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., asked a Federal District Court in Greensboro, N.C., to nullify the designation of smoke from other people's cigarettes as a carcinogen, a...
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 29, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department's criminal division is investigating allegations that Senate Republicans and the tobacco industry violated federal law by illegally colluding to torpedo anti-smoking legislation in June.The department quietly informed Senate Democratic Leader Tom Daschle on Aug. 17 that it would examine whether the industry and Senate Republicans engaged in an illegal quid pro quo: political advertising in exchange for votes."The allegation that tobacco companies may have promised favorable political advertising in exchange for a senator's vote on specific legislation raises concerns under the bribery and gratuity statutes," wrote Assistant Attorney General L. Anthony Sutin.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2003
Secondhand smoke does not appear to increase the risk for lung cancer and heart disease, says a study in the British Medical Journal that was partly funded by the tobacco industry. The study was quickly criticized by the American Cancer Society and other health groups as misleading and unreliable. "We are appalled that the tobacco industry has succeeded in giving visibility to a study with so many problems it literally failed to get a government grant," said Dr. Michael J. Thun, the society's national vice president of epidemiology.
NEWS
April 7, 2003
Don't idealize tobacco farmers' deadly work Gee, I just about wept with emotion reading the glowing, nostalgic story about the slow, agonizing death of the dear old tobacco industry ("A lifestyle going up in smoke," April 1). It kind of reminded me of the weeping I did as my husband died a slow agonizing death from lung cancer. I would suggest that The Sun think twice about romanticizing the life and work of tobacco farmers. These people knowingly grow a product that kills people. Why not write an upbeat piece about people who make and sell crack?
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