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NEWS
September 19, 1997
A FEW MONTHS ago, the prospects of strong political support for increasing taxes on cigarette packs by $1.50 or more would have seemed unlikely. Indeed, many observers considered the $368.5 million agreement negotiated with tobacco companies a huge victory for the anti-smoking movement.Maybe it was -- then. But public opinion is shifting against tobacco, and that landmark agreement is now all but dead.After weeks of ambivalence on the tobacco deal, President Clinton weighed in this week with a call for much stiffer payments and penalties for tobacco companies.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 21, 2014
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the first time used its legal authority to ban certain tobacco products from the market, the agency said Friday. The FDA said the maker of has ordered the maker of Sutra Bidis Red, Sutra Bidis Menthol, Sutra Bidis Red Cone and Sutra Bidis Menthol Cone to stop selling and distributing them in the United States. They are thin tobacco-filled cigarettes hand-rolled in leaves from a tendu tree and tied with a string. The FDA was given authority to regulate the manufacture, distribution and marketing of tobacco products from market under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009.
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NEWS
By Robert Reno | October 10, 1997
THOSE WHO DECIDE to run with the hounds have no complaint when they catch fleas, and those who think they can strike happy bargains in the public interest with tobacco companies ought to expect to get fleeced.This is the lesson being learned as Congress, the president and the attorneys general of 39 states and the commonwealth of Puerto Rico dither about whether to go ahead with a $368.5 billion settlement. It's offered as a sort of weird treaty by which the Tobacco Republic agrees to become America's staunch ally against the evil of smoking.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
James R. Adams, a giant on Madison Avenue during the years immediately after World War II, once said that advertising is the "principal reason why the business man has come to inherit the Earth. " Surely, the three weeks prior to an election give further reason why modern "Mad Men" still have a lot to say about how people behave at the polls, let alone the marketplace. Those ads for Question 7 that have flooded Maryland's airwaves in recent weeks aren't detached, dry recitations of why expanded gambling is good or bad for Maryland.
NEWS
By Avery M. Blank and Julie S. Siegel | March 17, 2010
Peach, mango, and chocolate are not just some of our favorite ice cream flavors. Rather, they are the new generation of smokers' favorite cigar flavors. Who are these smokers? More likely than not, they are kids. What should be done about the growing trend of kids using flavored tobacco products? Recognizing that tobacco companies target and entice teenagers by offering products in sweet and sassy flavors, Congress passed a law last June banning the sale of flavored cigarettes and allowing the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
NEWS
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 20, 2000
Just when you think the War on Smoking cannot possibly get any more entertaining, up pops a new batch of lawyers to save the day. Before I tell you about the latest legal wrinkle, let's review the key points in the War on Smoking so far: POINT ONE: Cigarettes are evil, because smokers smoke them and consequently become sick or dead. POINT TWO: The tobacco companies are evil, because they make and sell cigarettes. POINT THREE: Therefore, in 1998 there was a big settlement under which the tobacco companies, by way of punishment for making and selling cigarettes, agreed to pay more than $200 billion to 46 states and numerous concerned lawyers.
NEWS
April 20, 1997
FROM THE tobacco companies' standpoint, settling litigation filed against them by states and individuals is an economic imperative -- even if it costs $300 billion or more. But a settlement is an even more urgent imperative for public officials intent on gaining monetary relief for smokers whose health has been damaged by tobacco as well as curbing youth smoking.Negotiations under way between the largest tobacco giants and state attorneys general could lead to a proposed settlement that would put an end to tens of thousands of lawsuits.
NEWS
April 20, 1997
FROM THE tobacco companies' standpoint, settling litigation filed against them by states and individuals is an economic imperative -- even if it costs $300 billion or more. But a settlement is an even more urgent imperative for public officials intent on gaining monetary relief for smokers whose health has been damaged by tobacco as well as curbing youth smoking.Negotiations under way between the largest tobacco giants and state attorneys general could lead to a proposed settlement that would put an end to tens of thousands of lawsuits.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | April 15, 1993
LIFE OVER the course of the last half-century has bee confusing for those people who manufacture and sell cigarettes. Their product went from being an accepted part of daily life to a suspected carcinogen to the most reviled legal substance in America.But now their position should be quite clear. Tobacco companies fall into a separate and distinct category of business because they produce and market a product that has no redeeming value and that causes serious illness and death.Five years ago, when the American Bar Association considered -- and rejected -- a proposal that it endorse a ban on all tobacco advertising, one member described cigarettes as "uniquely perilous."
NEWS
March 25, 1997
THE ANNOUNCEMENT that a tobacco company has broken ranks with the industry and agreed to acknowledge that smoking is addictive and causes cancer is dramatic enough. But the part of the settlement reached by 22 states with the Liggett Group Inc. that may prove most threatening to the rest of the industry involves Liggett's admission that some tobacco marketing has been directed toward minors. This charge is one that tobacco officials have steadfastly denied, even under oath in congressional hearings.
NEWS
July 9, 2012
At $2 per pack, Maryland has one of the highest cigarette taxes in the nation - and has reaped considerable benefits from it. With every tobacco tax increase over the last 13 years, smoking rates in the state have declined, not only among children but with adults, too. That's not only been good for the budget - the cigarette tax accounts for nearly $400 million in revenue annually for the state or 90 percent of all the tobacco- and alcohol-related taxes...
NEWS
March 18, 2010
In Wednesday's column disparaging Maryland's life-saving 2007 tobacco tax increase ("Did cigarette tax increase do more harm than good?" March 17), Marc Kilmer neglects to mention that this increase, along with other policies such as Maryland's smoke free workplace law also encated in 2007, have combined to make Maryland's smoking rate the fourth lowest in the nation, saving thousands of lives and hundreds of millions of dollars that would have been...
NEWS
By Avery M. Blank and Julie S. Siegel | March 17, 2010
Peach, mango, and chocolate are not just some of our favorite ice cream flavors. Rather, they are the new generation of smokers' favorite cigar flavors. Who are these smokers? More likely than not, they are kids. What should be done about the growing trend of kids using flavored tobacco products? Recognizing that tobacco companies target and entice teenagers by offering products in sweet and sassy flavors, Congress passed a law last June banning the sale of flavored cigarettes and allowing the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
BUSINESS
January 28, 2010
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. has agreed to end its Camel Farm marketing campaign and pay $150,000 to settle a lawsuit by Maryland, which had accused the tobacco giant of using cartoons and brand-name trinkets in advertising to target young consumers, the Maryland attorney general's office announced Wednesday. Maryland's regulator contended that the marketing campaign violated the 1998 Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement that states reached with major tobacco companies when it used cartoons and brand-name giveaways to promote cigarettes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | September 8, 2009
Holliday H. Obrecht Jr., a retired executive of his family's wholesale tobacco and candy business who was active in service organizations, died Aug. 29 at the Levindale Center of complications of a fall he suffered in April outside his home. The Timonium resident was 83. Born in Baltimore and raised on Kentucky Avenue and in Guilford, he attended McDonogh School. He and fellow students talked its headmaster into letting them complete their final graduation studies early so they could enlist in the Army's Air Forces before they were drafted.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | April 3, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Landmark legislation that would give the federal government the power to regulate cigarettes and other tobacco products passed an early hurdle yesterday. The House Energy and Commerce Committee approved the bill, 38-12. The measure would allow the Food and Drug Administration to review new tobacco products before they could go on sale, limit advertising and restrict sales to youths. It would also enable the agency to regulate levels of tar, nicotine and other ingredients.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 23, 1998
THE tobacco companies say no. They won't agree to the new bill now moving through Congress that will require the industry to pay $506 billion over 25 years. It's too much, they say. And, besides, the bill won't give them immunity from lawsuits claiming damages to health. They'd rather fight than switch to bankruptcy.Congress and the president can still enact the law, of course. But if the tobacco companies choose to fight it, the law could be tied up in the courts for years. That's big tobacco's big threat.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 10, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, siding yesterday with smoking opponents, characterized as "totally unreasonable" a key provision of the proposed settlement between the tobacco industry and the nation's attorneys general that would prevent the government from regulating tobacco as a drug.The $368 billion agreement reached June 20 would forbid the Food and Drug Administration from banning nicotine in cigarettes for at least 12 years or if higher-nicotine cigarettes appear on the black market.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - Federal prosecutors alleged yesterday that the nation's tobacco companies colluded for half a century to addict Americans to nicotine in cigarettes that the industry knew caused cancer. Opening the largest civil racketeering trial ever, Justice Department attorneys used the cigarette companies' own internal documents to show how the industry set up sham research groups to counter medical evidence that smoking causes cancer and other diseases, even after industry scientists had secretly conceded the harmful effects on health.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
Tobacco companies and their allies have contributed $443,325 to candidates for elected office in Maryland since 1995, and those donations have generated favorable votes for the industry, according to a study released yesterday by the Common Cause Education Fund. The study found that six large tobacco companies -- including Philip Morris, RJ Reynolds and Brown & Williamson -- have spent an additional $1.7 million on lobbying fees and expenses since 1997. "This industry has so much power and so much influence," said Eric Gally, a lobbyist who has represented anti-smoking interests in Annapolis and is the principal author of the report.
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