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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has concluded for the first time that nicotine is a drug that should be regulated, and it has proposed limited, initial steps for regulating tobacco products, according to officials. The proposals involving only new limits on tobacco advertising and measures to curtail sales to young people.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 1998
LOS ANGELES -- The Los Angeles City Council passed a law yesterday that will virtually eliminate outdoor alcohol and tobacco advertising in Los Angeles.In a hearing attended by hundreds of elementary and high-school students as well as lawyers for the beer, billboard advertising and tobacco industries and advocates for grocers' associations, the City Council unanimously voted a ban encompassing billboards, grocery store windows and other outdoor venues within 1,000 feet of schools, parks and residential areas.
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SPORTS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 14, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The Orioles responded to anti-smoking pressure from the state legislature yesterday by banning tobacco advertising in Oriole Park at Camden Yards during the stadium's inaugural season. But the Orioles said fans still will be permitted to smoke in any seat in the house.The team said it intends to train and encourage ushers to relocate fans to other seats if they're disturbed by the smoke of others. Ushers also will distribute cards to smokers reminding them that their smoke may be bothering those seated nearby.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- After three years of battling advertisers in court, Baltimore gained the Supreme Court's permission yesterday to start banning billboards and other outdoor signs that promote cigarettes and liquor.The court refused to hear constitutional challenges to the two 1994 ordinances, which were designed to insulate children from at least some advertising that might entice them to smoke or drink.Opponents had argued unsuccessfully that the Baltimore ordinances violated the First Amendment's guarantee of free speech.
SPORTS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 14, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The Baltimore Orioles responded to anti-smoking pressure from the state legislature yesterday by banning tobacco advertising in Oriole Park at Camden Yards during the stadium's inaugural season. But the Orioles said fans still will be permitted to smoke in any seat in the house.The team said it intends to train and encourage ushers to relocate fans to other seats if they're disturbed by the smoke of others. Ushers also will distribute cards to smokers reminding them that their smoke may be bothering those seated nearby.
NEWS
By Peter H. Stone | May 19, 1996
FACING MYRIAD regulatory, legal and tax threats from Washington and the states, the tobacco industry has come out smoking. The industry has substantially boosted its Washington and state lobbying operations while heavily tilting its political contributions to the Republicans.Since the Clinton administration has come into office, the political landscape confronting the $45 billion-a-year tobacco industry has changed for the worse in some critical ways. To discourage smoking among youths, the Food and Drug hTC Administration -- with the White House's blessings -- is getting close to regulating nicotine as a drug.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
The Anne Arundel County Council will vote next month on a bill that would ban most outdoor tobacco advertising and effectively put Joe Camel under house arrest.The billboard and cigarette industries are lobbying hard against the proposal. And, as with the growing number of clashes nationally over tobacco advertising, some of the political maneuvering in Anne Arundel County appears to be smoke and mirrors.During the 18 months County Councilman Thomas W. Redmond has been pushing to outlaw cigarette billboards in residential areas, all cigarette billboards in Anne Arundel County -- as many as 15 signs -- have mysteriously disappeared.
NEWS
By Sylvia Fulwood & Barbara C. Ferguson | November 18, 1992
THERE are about 953 billboards in Baltimore City, of which 45 percent advertise alcohol and tobacco products.These billboards are located next to schools, beside churches, in front of homes, on highways and along scenic city vistas. They are 24-hour-a-day advertisements that constantly barrage children with messages about how to be successful in today's world. These billboards cannot be turned off or thrown away, like television or newspapers, and parents cannot protect their children from their deadly messages.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | April 15, 1993
LIFE OVER the course of the last half-century has bee confusing for those people who manufacture and sell cigarettes. Their product went from being an accepted part of daily life to a suspected carcinogen to the most reviled legal substance in America.But now their position should be quite clear. Tobacco companies fall into a separate and distinct category of business because they produce and market a product that has no redeeming value and that causes serious illness and death.Five years ago, when the American Bar Association considered -- and rejected -- a proposal that it endorse a ban on all tobacco advertising, one member described cigarettes as "uniquely perilous."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Lyle Denniston and Marcia Myers and Lyle Denniston,Sun Staff Writers | September 1, 1995
A federal appeals court yesterday upheld Baltimore's ban on alcohol and tobacco billboards in an opinion that also could boost the Clinton administration's attempts to curb advertising that encourages teen smoking.The Clinton effort has been challenged in two lawsuits in Greensboro, N.C., the same jurisdiction in which yesterday's ruling was made. The ruling, by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., gives an indication of how the circuit reacts to attempts to control tobacco advertising when it targets children.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1997
The Anne Arundel County Council will vote next month on a bill that would ban most outdoor tobacco advertising and effectively put Joe Camel under house arrest.The billboard and cigarette industries are lobbying hard against the proposal. And, as with the growing number of clashes nationally over tobacco advertising, some of the political maneuvering in Anne Arundel County appears to be smoke and mirrors.During the 18 months County Councilman Thomas W. Redmond has been pushing to outlaw cigarette billboards in residential areas, all cigarette billboards in Anne Arundel County -- as many as 15 signs -- have mysteriously disappeared.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | March 30, 1997
IF THE TOBACCO industry is fast losing favor with the American public, the word hasn't reached most members of the Maryland General Assembly.In their infinite wisdom, they have voted to crack down on drivers who run red lights or don't wear seat belts, perhaps leading to a change in public behavior that could save a handful of precious lives a year.But face the legislature with a true killer -- tobacco -- and they refuse even to allow the state to enforce its own laws against selling tobacco products to minors.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore's ordinances that restrict cigarette and liquor billboards, under attack in the courts since their passage three years ago and never enforced, face a new round of challenges in the Supreme Court.In two separate appeals filed this week, advertisers and marketers of cigarettes and liquor argued that the Baltimore ordinances are unconstitutional. The challengers lambasted a federal appeals court for upholding them without looking into whether the city had a real need for the billboard limits.
NEWS
By Peter H. Stone | May 19, 1996
FACING MYRIAD regulatory, legal and tax threats from Washington and the states, the tobacco industry has come out smoking. The industry has substantially boosted its Washington and state lobbying operations while heavily tilting its political contributions to the Republicans.Since the Clinton administration has come into office, the political landscape confronting the $45 billion-a-year tobacco industry has changed for the worse in some critical ways. To discourage smoking among youths, the Food and Drug hTC Administration -- with the White House's blessings -- is getting close to regulating nicotine as a drug.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Lyle Denniston and Marcia Myers and Lyle Denniston,Sun Staff Writers | September 1, 1995
A federal appeals court yesterday upheld Baltimore's ban on alcohol and tobacco billboards in an opinion that also could boost the Clinton administration's attempts to curb advertising that encourages teen smoking.The Clinton effort has been challenged in two lawsuits in Greensboro, N.C., the same jurisdiction in which yesterday's ruling was made. The ruling, by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Va., gives an indication of how the circuit reacts to attempts to control tobacco advertising when it targets children.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | August 27, 1995
Death is broadcast in red-and-black lettering on a sandwich sign in front of Churchill's LTD, a tobacconist at Towson Town Center: "LOST OUR LEASE EVERYTHING MUST GO SAVE UP TO 50%"About a half-hour's commute to Baltimore Street downtown, new vistas are celebrated at Fader's old-fashioned smoke shop: "GRAND OPENING . . . 'NO WORK' SMOKEPLACE LOUNGE"Nothing but simple storefront signs. But therein lies a tale of two tobacconists. As anti-smoking forces converge from all sides, from the White House to the medical community, some tobacco retailers such as Churchill's are going up in smoke.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1993
Bid for Indiana utility withdrawnA months-long battle for control of Indiana's largest electric utility ended with IPALCO Enterprises Inc.'s withdrawal of its $1.7 billion bid for PSI Resources Inc.IPALCO said yesterday that it failed to secure the proxy votes needed to elect a slate of candidates to the PSI board. The decision clears the way for PSI to continue its planned friendly merger with Cincinnati Gas & Electric Co.Delta offers early retirementDelta Air Lines, in the latest of several moves to rebound from a prolonged financial slump, said it was offering early retirement to 3,000 employees.
NEWS
October 15, 1993
A coalition of more than 100 Baltimore City community groups scored an unexpected victory in the General Assembly earlier this year. Defeating high-paid lobbyists, they garnered enough support to pass legislation that enables the city to limit certain types of advertising.Two detailed enforcement ordinances -- one for curtailing liquor advertising, the other restricting outdoor promotion of tobacco -- are now before the City Council. Chances for passage appear good, as 10 of the 19 council members are sponsors.
NEWS
By CARL ROWAN | August 16, 1995
Washington. -- When your mother dips Garrett snuff, your father chews any available brand of tobacco and your uncles puff on roll-your-own Bull Durham, you learn as a boy what a disgustingly filthy product tobacco is.Then you find that you're personally allergic to smoke, and you read how many people tobacco kills, and you develop an almost indelible contempt for the people who push it -- especially on children.So you are surprised and pleased that President Clinton, who once seemed terribly timid, has shown guts (and written off the electoral votes of most of the South)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration has concluded for the first time that nicotine is a drug that should be regulated, and it has proposed limited, initial steps for regulating tobacco products, according to officials. The proposals involving only new limits on tobacco advertising and measures to curtail sales to young people.
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