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NEWS
June 18, 2014
As a fan of both baseball and all around good guys, I was saddened to hear about the premature death of Tony Gwynn at 54 ( "What a sad day as Tony Gwynn leaves us too soon," June 16). Tony was one of the very best of his era, a batting champion many times, multiple All Star Team member, and an inductee into the baseball Hall of Fame along with the Orioles' own Cal Ripken. Many words were spoken about this outstanding figure from the world of sports, but very few were devoted to how was it that such a superb athlete came to such an early end. He died of cancer brought about by the use of the most deadly substance legally available in our society - tobacco.
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Ocean City officials voted earlier this week to draft a law to restrict smoking on the beach and boardwalk beginning May 1, 2015. The proposed ordinance, which passed on a 4-3 vote at a work session for the town council on Tuesday, identifies a number of designated areas for smoking along the boardwalk and on the beach. Police will be responsible for enforcement of the law through verbal as well as written citations ranging from $25 to $1,000, a "worse-case scenario" for non-compliance.
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NEWS
January 23, 2014
President Barack Obama's position on smoking marijuana is extremely misguided ( "Obama: pot a 'vice' but no more dangerous than alcohol," Jan. 19). As a 60-year-old boomer who has for the most part drunk responsibly for 45 years and has experimented with marijuana on occasion, I adamantly reject his opinion equating smoking pot to smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol. While drinking alcohol in moderation can gradually deteriorate one's ability to function adequately, smoking even a small amount of marijuana can debilitate a person in minutes without a warning.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Anyone who wants a job next year at Anne Arundel Medical Center — whether as a surgeon or security guard — will have to prove they don't smoke or use tobacco. The Annapolis hospital's new hiring policy might be controversial, but it is legal in Maryland and more than half of the United States. And it's a type of job screening that is gaining favor with employers — from hospitals to companies such as Alaska Airlines — trying to control rising health costs and cultivate a healthier, more productive workforce.
NEWS
May 13, 2012
Letter writer Gilbert Ross implies that there is no comparison between eating pizza and smoking ("Eating a slice a pizza is not the same as smoking a cigarette," May 10). As a physician, I disagree. Both tobacco and processed meats increase risk for cancer, heart disease and premature death. In fact, processed meat and other unhealthful foods kill more Americans annually than does tobacco. But this isn't just my opinion. A large body of research supports the link between processed meat and poor health.
NEWS
June 6, 1994
The tobacco companies are trying hard to portray themselves as persecuted by fanatics. In fact they are proving to be their own worst enemies. For all the millions they spend on advertising and high-powered public relations, their claims their product is just a pleasant relaxant, with no known ill effects, is pretty well demolished. The Food and Drug Administration is slowly moving toward regulating nicotine as a drug. It's about time.Long past time, judging from the records of some tobacco companies.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1994
WAYSONS CORNER -- Martin Zehner picked up the card that carried the tobacco company's offer for his harvest. He took a hard look, then carefully folded the card in half and stuck it back in the 235-pound stack of tobacco."
NEWS
By Robert V. Hess | March 26, 1999
A TV commercial airing in the Baltimore area features a young father concerned that the proposed $1 per-package increase in the tax on cigarettes in Maryland would cause him economic hardship, making it difficult for him to provide for his children.This ad shows how the tobacco companies will use any method -- no matter how deceptive -- to hold on to their profits.It's disturbing to see how Big Tobacco feigns concern for the poor when it has targeted this same group for years by placing billboards glamorizing smoking in inner-city neighborhoods, giving free sports equipment to youth leagues there and passing out free cigarettes to get residents addicted.
NEWS
December 26, 2007
A pack of five apple-flavored Black & Mild little cigars costs slightly less than a pack of cigarettes. Next month, it will cost a lot less. That's because while Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Maryland General Assembly chose to raise the tax on a pack of cigarettes by one dollar during this fall's special session, they neglected to raise taxes for any other form of tobacco. It's a glaring omission that needs to be corrected as soon as possible. Cigars, pipe tobacco, snuff and the like raise many of the same health concerns that cigarettes do. A little cigar, for instance, is inhaled just like a cigarette (an unfiltered one, at that)
NEWS
By Georges C. Benjamin | March 12, 2000
I REMEMBER her. She was an elderly African-American lady who arrived at my emergency department for evaluation of chest pain. I performed the standard emergency medical exam. The pain was not a result of any emergency causes I had been trained to recognize. But, one look at her right breast gave the diagnosis. She had a large mass -- hard, ulcerating and clearly cancerous. Further physical examination showed evidence that it had spread. Why had she not come in earlier? When I asked her about the mass, she said, "What mass?"
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
With a decision on Manny Machado's appeal to reduce a five-game suspension still pending, the third baseman played Saturday against the Tampa Bay Rays. But executive vice president Dan Duquette, speaking before the game to several hundred season-ticket holders at the annual "State of the Orioles" address, said Major League Baseball should reconsider why Machado was fined and suspended for throwing his bat against the Oakland Athletics on June 8 while reliever Fernando Abad, who threw near Machado's knees twice, received just an undisclosed fine.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | June 20, 2014
Anne Arundel Medical Center has adopted a new policy that prohibits use of all tobacco products, including e-cigarettes. And next year, the hospital plans to stop hiring anyone who uses tobacco products. The hospital has banned cigarette smoking on campus since 2007, like many hospitals, but the new policy in effect July 1 was expanded to include the smokeless products. And there will be no designated smoking areas in garages or on sidewalks. The policy applies to staff, as well as vendors and visitors.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
As a fan of both baseball and all around good guys, I was saddened to hear about the premature death of Tony Gwynn at 54 ( "What a sad day as Tony Gwynn leaves us too soon," June 16). Tony was one of the very best of his era, a batting champion many times, multiple All Star Team member, and an inductee into the baseball Hall of Fame along with the Orioles' own Cal Ripken. Many words were spoken about this outstanding figure from the world of sports, but very few were devoted to how was it that such a superb athlete came to such an early end. He died of cancer brought about by the use of the most deadly substance legally available in our society - tobacco.
NEWS
June 2, 2014
Well, it seems that Vincent DeMarco and his Maryland Citizens Health Initiative Group are back at it again proposing yet another $1 per pack increase in Maryland's tobacco tax which is already highest in the region. In his latest letter to the editor, there's even a thinly-veiled threat to Attorney General Doug Gansler and the Republican candidates for governor that, if elected, they'd better not try to repeal any of the tobacco or alcohol taxes enacted during the O'Malley-Brown administration ( "Md.'s tobacco, alcohol tax increases are saving lives," May 28)
NEWS
May 28, 2014
We at the Maryland Health Care For All Coalition, representing hundreds of faith, community, labor, business and health care groups from across Maryland, hope that when Attorney General Doug Gansler and the Republican candidates for governor criticize the "40 new taxes" enacted under the O'Malley administration they are not including in their criticism the life saving tobacco and alcohol tax increases approved in 2007, 2011 and 2012. The one-dollar per pack cigarette tax increase enacted in 2007, which Attorney General Gansler supported, has helped to reduce cigarette smoking by 32 percent in Maryland, almost double the national average, and by 40 percent among teens.
NEWS
By Taylor Branch | March 29, 2001
FOUR YEARS AGO, the Maryland legislature rejected a bill to punish adults who sell cigarettes illegally to children. Tobacco lobbyists argued that the comptroller was handling state enforcement already, and the session ended before Louis L. Goldstein candidly advised the House of Delegates that his office had not cited a single merchant during the entire decade. Not one. Lobbyists struck again last Thursday, when no-shows left a committee majority two votes short of the required number for an expected floor debate.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
Dan Rodricks in his column, "Pot fears expose fears about societal health" (Feb. 27), starts to address some of the potential ramifications of legalizing marijuana in Maryland. He posits that most people "acknowledge the possibility that it could lead to more problems … but who knows how this will turn out?" Mr. Rodricks' concerns about not focusing on the health impact are valid and should be addressed. Health professionals and researchers have decades of experience studying the effects of regular marijuana use by adolescents.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 21, 2014
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the first time used its legal authority to ban certain tobacco products from the market, the agency said Friday. The FDA said the maker of has ordered the maker of Sutra Bidis Red, Sutra Bidis Menthol, Sutra Bidis Red Cone and Sutra Bidis Menthol Cone to stop selling and distributing them in the United States. They are thin tobacco-filled cigarettes hand-rolled in leaves from a tendu tree and tied with a string. The FDA was given authority to regulate the manufacture, distribution and marketing of tobacco products from market under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009.
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