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By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1994
The battle of toad vs. road in St. Mary's County has moved into the realm of legislative politics.For the first time since the state Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act was adopted in 1971, a delegation of lawmakers is asking for an exemption to the act. The exception would allow the county to improve Indian Bridge Road despite the state decision that the project threatens the existence of the eastern narrow-mouthed toad, listed as endangered in...
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
My azaleas are so big that they're growing above my kitchen windowsills. I know you're not supposed to prune until after they bloom in spring, but I can't wait that long. Will I ruin these shrubs by pruning now? It's best to wait, because late season pruning can stimulate your shrubs to produce new shoots. This uses up the plants' stored energy and makes it harder for them to prepare for winter survival. Also, the new shoots may not have time to mature and harden for winter, which risks killing them.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | September 15, 1993
The Eastern narrow-mouthed toad has not been spotted officially in St. Mary's County for years, which doesn't necessarily mean it's not there. That's how it is with this toad, a critter about the size of a half-dollar that makes a career out of being unseen.Shy as it is, the amphibian lately is casting a long shadow over California, Md., where the county Public Works Department plans to rebuild a two-lane road next to St. Mary's State Park.But the widening of Indian Bridge Road poses a threat to the toad, protected by the state since 1972 as an endangeredspecies in Maryland.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | September 29, 2011
A toad lunged at me while I was weeding our bean patch, and the encounter startled both of us. A toad was the last creature I expected to see in our garden, because except for a puddle or two, there's no water on the property, and toads require places with vegetation in close proximity to water for breeding purposes. And in the decades that I've lived on the property, I've only seen toads twice before. The eastern American toad ( Bufo a. americanus ) left in a hurry. After all, I'm a giant by comparison to its overall length of 4 inches, and a potential predator.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 5, 2001
A series of environmental dominoes beginning with global climate change may explain one of the decade's most perplexing biological mysteries - the sharp decline in amphibians - according to a new study of toads in Oregon. A team of researchers studying western toads in the Cascade Range has tied together a series of seemingly unrelated events, warm weather patterns over the South Pacific, decreased rainfall in the Pacific Northwest, ultraviolet radiation and a fungus-like pathogen. Simply put: The research team found that unusually dry winters caused by El Nino meant ponds in which toad embryos mature contained less water, making them more vulnerable to both ultraviolet radiation and a destructive fungus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Harris Russell and Mary Harris Russell,Chicago Tribune | April 10, 2005
The Sphere of Secrets By Catherine Fisher. Greenwillow. $16.99. Ages 11-14 years. Starting with the second book of this series would be difficult. If you have, however, read The Oracle Betrayed (or after you have), Book 2 continues the fast turns of plot and character. It combines some aspects of the mythologies of ancient Greece and Egypt, with an Oracle, a Speaker for the oracle, and a child, Archon, ruling over a kingdom of political intrigue and mercantile power. Mirany, a young attendant to the Speaker, and the one through whom the divinity is actually speaking, seeks an end to the intrigue.
NEWS
By Robert Lee and Robert Lee,Staff writer | October 18, 1990
David Troy, 18, a self-professed free-market idealist who co-owns Toad Computers in Olde Severna Park, quotes Ralph Waldo Emerson to explain the philosophy he followed to get his early start in business."
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | September 29, 2011
A toad lunged at me while I was weeding our bean patch, and the encounter startled both of us. A toad was the last creature I expected to see in our garden, because except for a puddle or two, there's no water on the property, and toads require places with vegetation in close proximity to water for breeding purposes. And in the decades that I've lived on the property, I've only seen toads twice before. The eastern American toad ( Bufo a. americanus ) left in a hurry. After all, I'm a giant by comparison to its overall length of 4 inches, and a potential predator.
NEWS
August 11, 1991
Phoenix II TheaterWorks' Summer Theater FunFest continues with "The Wind in the Willows," which will be presented Aug. 14 through 20 at Harford Community College's Chesapeake Theater.Curtain times are 1and 7 p.m. Aug. 14; 7 p.m. Aug. 15; 1 and 7 p.m. Aug. 16; 7 p.m. Aug. 17; 3 p.m. Aug. 18; 7 p.m. Aug. 19; and 1 p.m. Aug. 20.This dramatization of Kenneth Grahame's story concerns the friendship of the good-hearted and poetic water rat, the innocent and curious mole, and the sensible, practical badger.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Amid intense scrutiny into the judicial record of Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr., perhaps nothing seems as curious as the hubbub surrounding his brief remarks two years ago about a striped toad in California. The judge's four-paragraph argument that the endangered toad should not be protected by federal environmental laws strikes at the heart of many rights that Americans enjoy, including such basics as a minimum wage and clean drinking water. And it will become a focal point for tough questioning during Roberts' confirmation hearing next month, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2011
As a general rule, it's best to steer clear of wineries with cute animal names and logos. Many have a certain "eau de zoo. " But this oak-free chardonnay from Toad Hollow is too well-made to ignore. It's also a reminder that many of the chardonnays that are thrust into oak aren't improved one bit. This is a crisp, stylish wine with plenty of lemon, peach, apple and grapefruit flavor and a bright, lasting finish. It's a delicious wine for summer sipping, and there's no reason to hang on to it when you can enjoy it now. From: Mendocino County, Calif.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2005
This summer a toad took up residence in the flower pot on my front steps. In September, he disappeared. On Sunday I was pulling up old mums next to my front steps and the toad fell from the roots. I felt bad for disturbing him, so I put him back in the ground with the mum. Did I do more harm than good? Toads overwinter in soil below the frost line. They prefer nice loose soil with leaf litter and moist soil. They especially like the soil under log piles, brush piles and rocks for hibernating.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - Amid intense scrutiny into the judicial record of Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr., perhaps nothing seems as curious as the hubbub surrounding his brief remarks two years ago about a striped toad in California. The judge's four-paragraph argument that the endangered toad should not be protected by federal environmental laws strikes at the heart of many rights that Americans enjoy, including such basics as a minimum wage and clean drinking water. And it will become a focal point for tough questioning during Roberts' confirmation hearing next month, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Harris Russell and Mary Harris Russell,Chicago Tribune | April 10, 2005
The Sphere of Secrets By Catherine Fisher. Greenwillow. $16.99. Ages 11-14 years. Starting with the second book of this series would be difficult. If you have, however, read The Oracle Betrayed (or after you have), Book 2 continues the fast turns of plot and character. It combines some aspects of the mythologies of ancient Greece and Egypt, with an Oracle, a Speaker for the oracle, and a child, Archon, ruling over a kingdom of political intrigue and mercantile power. Mirany, a young attendant to the Speaker, and the one through whom the divinity is actually speaking, seeks an end to the intrigue.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2004
One of the oldest life forms on Earth is disappearing, and no one knows why. The number of amphibians - a class of creature that predates the dinosaur and includes frogs, toads and salamanders - is declining across the world at astonishing rates. Costa Rica's golden toad vanished from a pristine wildlife refuge in about three years. Fewer chorus frogs are singing in upstate New York, and the Mississippi gopher frog has all but disappeared from the Southeast. There could be many reasons: climate change, habitat loss, man-made pollutants, and recently discovered diseases.
NEWS
February 10, 2003
ToadNet Inc. a privately owned Internet service provider located in Severna Park, has acquired Radicus Internet LLC, a Baltimore-based Internet service provider. The acquisition of Radicus Internet, which provides access and related services to business and residential customers in the mid-Atlantic region, further expands ToadNet's reach into the mid-Atlantic market. Radicus Internet's more than 1,300 business and residential customers gain access to ToadNet's full range of Internet services provided through its regional network.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 28, 2002
A WHILE BACK, I wrote a novel. It is not an important novel, the kind that explores, with nuance and subtlety, the complexities of the human condition. It's a novel where a guy falls face-first onto a toad, which squirts him with a chemical that causes him to believe his dog is Elizabeth Dole. Incredibly, my novel got made into a movie. I'm still not sure how this happened. Maybe a studio executive fell onto a toad. All I know is, a vast army of movie people came from California to Miami and spent several months, and many millions of dollars, doing what people do when they make a movie, which is, most of the time, nothing.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | July 6, 1997
THINGS THAT GO bump in the night are frequent nocturnal visitors when you're three years old. A flip of the light switch, a drink of water, a comforting parental hug and they usually vanish. Sometimes, a little snuggling in bed next to mommy or daddy is the silver bullet.So when Ellie came padding into the bedroom one night, frightened and pleading for help, it was not unexpected. In a semi-somnambulant state, she explained in a single lucid burst of anxiety: "The toad is trying to get me!"
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 28, 2002
A WHILE BACK, I wrote a novel. It is not an important novel, the kind that explores, with nuance and subtlety, the complexities of the human condition. It's a novel where a guy falls face-first onto a toad, which squirts him with a chemical that causes him to believe his dog is Elizabeth Dole. Incredibly, my novel got made into a movie. I'm still not sure how this happened. Maybe a studio executive fell onto a toad. All I know is, a vast army of movie people came from California to Miami and spent several months, and many millions of dollars, doing what people do when they make a movie, which is, most of the time, nothing.
NEWS
March 17, 2002
Audubon Society of Central Maryland will hold its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Mount Airy branch library, 705 Ridge Ave. Wayne Hildebrand, Maryland Calling Amphibian coordinator, will discuss Maryland's frogs and toads. The Central Maryland Chapter serves Carroll, Frederick and Howard counties, with membership concentrated in Columbia and Mount Airy. The chapter alternates meetings between Mount Airy and Columbia. Meetings are open to the public. Information: 410-833-5155.
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