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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- Five of the world's largest media companies are threatening to sue TiVo Inc., Replay Networks Inc. and other makers of so-called TV replay devices unless they agree to obtain licenses to use network programming.Time Warner Inc., Walt Disney Co., News Corp., CBS Corp. and Discovery Communications Inc. said yesterday that they formed a coalition to protect TV copyrights by forcing the device makers to negotiate and acquire program licenses.The devices, or personal video recorders, let users create a lineup of their favorite shows that can be digitally recorded and then viewed anytime.
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NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | July 29, 2007
SHE MAY LOOK AND SOUND LIKE Paula Deen and she is really into food ("The only thing I don't like is boiled okra."), but Marcia S. Harris, president of the Restaurant Association of Maryland, doesn't have a TV show. However, she does like watching television -- including MTV -- and she admires Deen. "I love her exuberance for food, her lack of fear for food. Growing up in the south [Memphis, Tenn.] as I did, her kind of cooking is very appealing to me. There's nothing that butter hasn't made better."
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BUSINESS
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,Los Angeles Times | February 8, 2007
Through a deal with TiVo Inc., Amazon.com Inc. is trying to bridge the river-wide gap between the PC and television. The two companies announced yesterday an alliance that lets some TiVo customers watch, on their TVs, movies and television shows purchased through Amazon's nascent online-video store, Unbox. The service addresses one of the greatest impediments to the growth of Internet video - viewers can't watch it on their living room TVs. "There's a ton of content flowing over broadband - premium content, meaning the best in movies and television shows," TiVo Chief Executive Officer Tom Rogers said.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,sun reporter | May 25, 2007
Kimberly Pugh wanted to cry. For 20 weeks, Pugh and her husband watched American Idol religiously. They sat through the guy who thought he was Taylor Hicks' twin; the emotional auditions; the seemingly unstoppable, off-key Sanjaya Malakar. Heading toward the finals, they cheered first for Melinda Doolittle, and then for Jordin Sparks as they prepared their digital video recorder to capture Wednesday's finale. "We set our DVR for two hours and two minutes just to be sure," the 43-year-old Chicago yoga instructor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | August 9, 1999
I've been playing with the first generation of digital video recorders, or DVRs, for a few weeks now. To their manufacturers, I want to say this: Please don't take them away from me!They're that cool.The machines I have at home are the TiVo, sold under the Philips brand name, and the Replay TV. These are the first of what promise to be many digital video recorders to come. (Last month, Dish Network, a direct satellite television service, announced a quirky but tempting hybrid product that combines satellite TV, Web TV and a limited-capability digital video recorder all for $199 plus monthly subscription fees.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
On Demand, which is available only to digital cable subscribers, gives viewers access via the internet to a library of 1,500 hours of programs, ranging from episodes of HBO's The Sopranos, to Pilates workouts and local newscasts. Many programs are available at no charge, with access to certain programs from premium channels priced from $2.95 to $4.95. Netflix subscribers, for a monthly fee of $21.95, have access to a library of 20,000 movies and TV shows on DVD. Customers go online to order titles, and the DVD is mailed to their home or office.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2000
Plugged In is looking for "early adopters" who have experience with two types of high-end home technology. Specifically, want to talk to folks who have set up wireless home computer networks, or those who have installed new digital video recorders such as ReplayTV and TiVo. If you've tried any of these these and are willing to share your experiences - good or bad - please send e-mail to pluggedin@baltsun.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2000
Let's fast-forward to the very near future and see what a typical night of television viewing will be like: You get home from work and watch your favorite hour-long soap opera in 40 minutes. You watch the nightly news in 15. "Seinfeld" in 21. "Monday Night Football" in 26, and a World Series game in about 20. It will be easy to watch everything that quickly - just skip the commercials. And everything else you'd rather not watch, such as time-outs, pitching changes, close-up-and-personals, movie credits and those boring talking heads.
FEATURES
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,sun reporter | May 25, 2007
Kimberly Pugh wanted to cry. For 20 weeks, Pugh and her husband watched American Idol religiously. They sat through the guy who thought he was Taylor Hicks' twin; the emotional auditions; the seemingly unstoppable, off-key Sanjaya Malakar. Heading toward the finals, they cheered first for Melinda Doolittle, and then for Jordin Sparks as they prepared their digital video recorder to capture Wednesday's finale. "We set our DVR for two hours and two minutes just to be sure," the 43-year-old Chicago yoga instructor said.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | July 29, 2007
SHE MAY LOOK AND SOUND LIKE Paula Deen and she is really into food ("The only thing I don't like is boiled okra."), but Marcia S. Harris, president of the Restaurant Association of Maryland, doesn't have a TV show. However, she does like watching television -- including MTV -- and she admires Deen. "I love her exuberance for food, her lack of fear for food. Growing up in the south [Memphis, Tenn.] as I did, her kind of cooking is very appealing to me. There's nothing that butter hasn't made better."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | April 22, 2007
Do you think my shares of TiVo Inc. are headed upward? - C.T., via Internet It is never easy to be a pioneer, even a tenacious one with a well-known name. The digital video-recording service that lets subscribers pause, rewind and fast-forward has become synonymous with recording television programs. Revenues are derived from sales of its TiVo unit and subscriptions. It finds itself increasingly doing battle with DVR services being offered by competitors such as cable and satellite TV providers and computer-based media centers.
BUSINESS
By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Dawn C. Chmielewski,Los Angeles Times | February 8, 2007
Through a deal with TiVo Inc., Amazon.com Inc. is trying to bridge the river-wide gap between the PC and television. The two companies announced yesterday an alliance that lets some TiVo customers watch, on their TVs, movies and television shows purchased through Amazon's nascent online-video store, Unbox. The service addresses one of the greatest impediments to the growth of Internet video - viewers can't watch it on their living room TVs. "There's a ton of content flowing over broadband - premium content, meaning the best in movies and television shows," TiVo Chief Executive Officer Tom Rogers said.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 16, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - Comcast Corp. threw a life preserver to struggling TiVo Inc. yesterday, agreeing to pay the pioneer of digital video recorders to develop a service for Comcast's 21.5 million cable-TV customers. The agreement will bring TiVo innovations to Comcast's own digital video recorders, or DVRs, including software that can anticipate what a viewer wants to see. But the TiVo technology will come only as a premium service, Comcast said - at a yet-to-be-determined fee in addition to the regular monthly cable bill.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 8, 2004
NEW YORK - Netflix Inc., the largest mail-order video-rental service, and TiVo Inc. reportedly are negotiating a deal to start a service that would let customers download movies into TiVo's digital video recorders. TiVo won't offer a movie-download service for at least a year, spokeswoman Kathryn Kelly said in an interview, commenting on a report in Newsweek magazine. She and Netflix spokeswoman Lynn Brinton said the companies don't have a partnership or a schedule to establish one, but such an agreement might make sense in the future, they said.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2004
On Demand, which is available only to digital cable subscribers, gives viewers access via the internet to a library of 1,500 hours of programs, ranging from episodes of HBO's The Sopranos, to Pilates workouts and local newscasts. Many programs are available at no charge, with access to certain programs from premium channels priced from $2.95 to $4.95. Netflix subscribers, for a monthly fee of $21.95, have access to a library of 20,000 movies and TV shows on DVD. Customers go online to order titles, and the DVD is mailed to their home or office.
BUSINESS
By Jube Shiver Jr. and Jube Shiver Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 5, 2004
WASHINGTON - Over the objection of the entertainment industry, regulators yesterday approved technology that allows TiVo subscribers to send recorded television shows over the Internet. The decision by the Federal Communications Commission is expected to encourage consumer electronics companies to offer digital devices that give users more control over how and where they watch the programs they record. TiVo Inc.'s TiVoGuard was among 13 anti-piracy technologies the FCC certified yesterday.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 8, 2004
NEW YORK - Netflix Inc., the largest mail-order video-rental service, and TiVo Inc. reportedly are negotiating a deal to start a service that would let customers download movies into TiVo's digital video recorders. TiVo won't offer a movie-download service for at least a year, spokeswoman Kathryn Kelly said in an interview, commenting on a report in Newsweek magazine. She and Netflix spokeswoman Lynn Brinton said the companies don't have a partnership or a schedule to establish one, but such an agreement might make sense in the future, they said.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | April 22, 2007
Do you think my shares of TiVo Inc. are headed upward? - C.T., via Internet It is never easy to be a pioneer, even a tenacious one with a well-known name. The digital video-recording service that lets subscribers pause, rewind and fast-forward has become synonymous with recording television programs. Revenues are derived from sales of its TiVo unit and subscriptions. It finds itself increasingly doing battle with DVR services being offered by competitors such as cable and satellite TV providers and computer-based media centers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2000
Let's fast-forward to the very near future and see what a typical night of television viewing will be like: You get home from work and watch your favorite hour-long soap opera in 40 minutes. You watch the nightly news in 15. "Seinfeld" in 21. "Monday Night Football" in 26, and a World Series game in about 20. It will be easy to watch everything that quickly - just skip the commercials. And everything else you'd rather not watch, such as time-outs, pitching changes, close-up-and-personals, movie credits and those boring talking heads.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2000
Plugged In is looking for "early adopters" who have experience with two types of high-end home technology. Specifically, want to talk to folks who have set up wireless home computer networks, or those who have installed new digital video recorders such as ReplayTV and TiVo. If you've tried any of these these and are willing to share your experiences - good or bad - please send e-mail to pluggedin@baltsun.com.
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