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By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,sun music critic | April 2, 2007
Washington National Opera opened its effervescent production of Donizetti's comic gem, La Fille du Regiment, over the weekend with the considerable help of a fille from its own regiment. Although perhaps best known for a high-C-riddled tenor aria, this opera is firmly centered around the title role, The Daughter of the Regiment - lovable Marie, an orphan adopted and raised by some awfully nice soldiers. When Italian soprano Stefania Bonfadeli bowed out of that role due to illness just before last Thursday's dress rehearsal, a game reinforcement saved the day. If you go La Fille du Regiment has six more performances through April 15 at the Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, Northwest.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Dmitri Hvorostovsky, the Russian baritone who will give a recital for the Washington Performing Arts Society at the Kennedy Center Wednesday night, has one of the finest voices of our time. He doesn't mind saying so himself. “It is still a perfect instrument,” the 50-year-old Hvorostovsky said from New York, where he recently wrapped up well-received performances as Rodrigo in Verdi's epic “Don Carlo” at the Metropolitan Opera. “Of course the color has changed, but I've managed to keep it fresh.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | February 29, 1996
Low notesMost bassos would sell their souls to sing the title role in Arrigo Boito's "Mefistofele." Samuel Ramey doesn't need to -- he already owns the part.The great basso makes his belated Washington Opera debut in his signature role in a new production Sunday at the Kennedy Center.Performances at the Kennedy Center are Sunday at 2 p.m.; March 5, March 8 and March 13 at 8 p.m.; March 11 and March 16 at 7 p.m.; and March 19 (with Barseg Tumanyan replacing Ramey in the title role) at 8 p.m. Tickets, at $52-$110, and further information are available by calling (202)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley | mary.mccauley@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 5, 2010
The 19th-century British actress Fanny Kemble was among the most influential women in America and simultaneously one of the least powerful. She argued politics over dinner with a U.S. president and inspired such seminal literary works as Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" and Henry James' " Washington Square." She wrote plays, poetry and memoirs, and became an abolitionist. And yet, she was kept away from her two daughters for most of their childhoods. "She had a phenomenal life filled with contradictions," says Tom Ziegler, whose two-character play "Mrs.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 4, 2001
The regional opera season is breaking out a little early this year. It's starting in the nation's capital, where the latest manifestation of super-philanthropist Alberto Vilar's influence can be observed. The Washington Opera, which for years followed a mid-fall-through-spring schedule, now is splitting up its activities into two parts. The first half of the 2001-2002 season opens Saturday with Offenbach's The Tales of Hoffmann in a new co-production with the Kirov Opera's Mariinsky Theater in St. Petersburg, and the Los Angeles Opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | June 6, 2004
The Queen of the South, by Arturo Perez-Reverte. Putnam. 448 pages. $25.95. The hero who runs the show in an Arturo Perez-Reverte novel tends to be of a genteel type, with a noble pedigree or suitably refined job title -- art expert or fencing master, museum curator or rare-book hunter. When he kills or dies, it is often while pursuing something noble, or at least intellectually intriguing, such as a historic nautical treasure, a forbidden manuscript or lost honor. Partly for that reason, critics and marketers seem determined to label Perez-Reverte -- a Spaniard who has built a deservedly sizable American following -- as an author of "intellectual thrillers," a title promising brainy entertainment even while suggesting that this isn't quite the stuff of literary greatness.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | January 15, 2008
The star power of soprano Renee Fleming and Italian crossover sensation Andrea Bocelli, and a resumed Ring Cycle, will help animate Washington National Opera's 2008-2009 season. The big news, vocally speaking, is the company debut of the sumptuous-voiced, exceptionally popular Fleming, who will sing the title role in a new production of Donizetti's Lucrezia Borgia, a gem from the early 19th-century bel canto repertoire. This will be Fleming's first staged performance of the work in the U.S. A previous encounter with the opera provoked boos when she performed it in 1998 before the notoriously volcanic public at La Scala in Milan, Italy.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 24, 2003
Ataste of tragedy, comedy and psycho-sexuality is in store for the Baltimore Opera Company's audiences during the 2003-2004 season. The total dosage of operatic fare will be smaller - four productions instead of the current five. Like most other arts organizations in the country, the company is feeling the pinch of harder economic times. It also has been dealing with considerable uncertainty over the start of planned renovations at the Lyric Opera House. "We thought we would have to leave the theater in March 2004," BOC general director Michael Harrison said, "so that complicated everything.
NEWS
March 31, 1996
SCOTS WHA hae wi' Wallace bled. . .Baltimoreans know William Wallace as the heroic statue overlooking the reservoir in Druid Hill Park, and local moviegoers know him as the medieval Scottish warrior played by actor-director Mel Gibson in the film "Braveheart," which the Motion Picture Academy unaccountably honored last week with five Oscars, including the coveted award as the best picture of 1995.Gory violence is sordid when set in the future, grimly realistic in the present and historically ennobling in the past.
NEWS
May 18, 2006
Frankie Thomas, 85, who became famous in the 1950s for his starring role in the TV children's show Tom Corbett, Space Cadet, died of respiratory failure May 11 in Sherman Oaks, Calif. He began acting on Broadway in the early 1930s and soon ventured west to Hollywood, where he appeared in films including A Dog of Flanders, Boys Town and The Major and the Minor, as well as four Nancy Drew movies. In 1950, he beat out actors including Jack Lemmon to win the title role of Tom Corbett, a Space Academy cadet who was training to become a member of the elite Solar Guard, 400 years in the future.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | January 15, 2008
The star power of soprano Renee Fleming and Italian crossover sensation Andrea Bocelli, and a resumed Ring Cycle, will help animate Washington National Opera's 2008-2009 season. The big news, vocally speaking, is the company debut of the sumptuous-voiced, exceptionally popular Fleming, who will sing the title role in a new production of Donizetti's Lucrezia Borgia, a gem from the early 19th-century bel canto repertoire. This will be Fleming's first staged performance of the work in the U.S. A previous encounter with the opera provoked boos when she performed it in 1998 before the notoriously volcanic public at La Scala in Milan, Italy.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | November 20, 2007
It's looking like a trend. A year after the Metropolitan Opera shook things up by beaming live, high-def performances to movie theaters throughout this country and beyond, several famed Italian opera houses will take advantage of the same technology to enter the U.S. market this season. A production from last season of Verdi's Aida from Milan's La Scala will launch this new venture, which uses live performances on tape, rather than simulcasts. The cast will include Roberto Alagna as Radames - this is apparently the one complete performance he gave of the role at La Scala last year, a couple of nights before he was booed and, famously, walked out. Violeta Urmana sings the title role, and Riccardo Chailly conducts.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith ... and Tim Smith ...,sun music critic | April 2, 2007
Washington National Opera opened its effervescent production of Donizetti's comic gem, La Fille du Regiment, over the weekend with the considerable help of a fille from its own regiment. Although perhaps best known for a high-C-riddled tenor aria, this opera is firmly centered around the title role, The Daughter of the Regiment - lovable Marie, an orphan adopted and raised by some awfully nice soldiers. When Italian soprano Stefania Bonfadeli bowed out of that role due to illness just before last Thursday's dress rehearsal, a game reinforcement saved the day. If you go La Fille du Regiment has six more performances through April 15 at the Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, Northwest.
SPORTS
By Heather A. Dinich and Heather A. Dinich,Sun Reporter | November 25, 2006
COLLEGE PARK -- The lack of attention the Maryland football team received in August apparently stung enough that senior cornerback Josh Wilson brought it up this week - unprompted. He and quarterback Sam Hollenbach, Maryland's two senior representatives at the Atlantic Coast Conference Football Kickoff in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., this summer, were virtually ignored at the media gathering. After back-to-back 5-6 seasons, the interest was primarily in other programs. "We're looking at Florida State, we're looking at Miami and Clemson - everybody is talking to them," Wilson said.
NEWS
May 18, 2006
Frankie Thomas, 85, who became famous in the 1950s for his starring role in the TV children's show Tom Corbett, Space Cadet, died of respiratory failure May 11 in Sherman Oaks, Calif. He began acting on Broadway in the early 1930s and soon ventured west to Hollywood, where he appeared in films including A Dog of Flanders, Boys Town and The Major and the Minor, as well as four Nancy Drew movies. In 1950, he beat out actors including Jack Lemmon to win the title role of Tom Corbett, a Space Academy cadet who was training to become a member of the elite Solar Guard, 400 years in the future.
SPORTS
By Dan Hickling and Dan Hickling,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 21, 2005
BOSTON - Baltimore Bayhawks. Long Island Lizards. After a year's absence, they're back playing for the championship of Major League Lacrosse. The Bayhawks and Lizards will vie for the crown for the fourth time in five years starting at 1:05 p.m. today on the fast, artificial surface of Boston University's Nickerson Field, While it's been a safe bet for some time that the Bayhawks (11-2) would be contending for their second title (first since 2002), Long Island's final berth was not nearly so predictable.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | November 24, 1993
The secret ingredient of the Thanksgiving movie-marketing strategy is a drug. Fortunately it's not manufactured by a laboratory but by a turkey. It's tryptophan, the natural tranquilizer found in the big bird you will probably eat tomorrow. It will make you sleepy in the middle of the day. And you know you can't go to sleep in the middle of the day after a big Thanksgiving meal.What to do?Go to the movies!That's why they release them on Wednesday, not Friday. Are these guys smart or what?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Dmitri Hvorostovsky, the Russian baritone who will give a recital for the Washington Performing Arts Society at the Kennedy Center Wednesday night, has one of the finest voices of our time. He doesn't mind saying so himself. “It is still a perfect instrument,” the 50-year-old Hvorostovsky said from New York, where he recently wrapped up well-received performances as Rodrigo in Verdi's epic “Don Carlo” at the Metropolitan Opera. “Of course the color has changed, but I've managed to keep it fresh.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 30, 2005
Love, death, jealousy, obsession, violence - these are at the heart of Bizet's Carmen. Distill the four-hour opera down to its essence - as Peter Brook and his collaborators have done in their 80-minute adaptation - and presumably these core characteristics become more intense. But director Jim Petosa's production at Olney Theatre Center is surprisingly lacking in intensity. Despite a strong lead performance - powerfully acted as well as sung - by Stephanie Chigas, La Tragedie de Carmen has an almost clinical feel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | June 6, 2004
The Queen of the South, by Arturo Perez-Reverte. Putnam. 448 pages. $25.95. The hero who runs the show in an Arturo Perez-Reverte novel tends to be of a genteel type, with a noble pedigree or suitably refined job title -- art expert or fencing master, museum curator or rare-book hunter. When he kills or dies, it is often while pursuing something noble, or at least intellectually intriguing, such as a historic nautical treasure, a forbidden manuscript or lost honor. Partly for that reason, critics and marketers seem determined to label Perez-Reverte -- a Spaniard who has built a deservedly sizable American following -- as an author of "intellectual thrillers," a title promising brainy entertainment even while suggesting that this isn't quite the stuff of literary greatness.
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