Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTitle Companies
IN THE NEWS

Title Companies

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Title companies again narrowly avoided yesterday being forced to give up the interest they earn on their clients' escrow accounts.By a 12-10 vote, the House Ways and Means Committee agreed not to use title company interest as the source of funding for the proposed Maryland Affordable Housing Trust, a fund that would help pay for affordable housing in Maryland.For years, title companies have fought a turf battle with law firms over the interest earned on client escrow accounts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
A federal judge authorized a class-action suit Wednesday against one of the state's largest real estate groups, after a Howard County couple accused it of running a half-million dollar kickback scheme with a title insurance company. A suit filed in Baltimore by home buyers Christine and Patrick Baehr alleges The Creig Northrop Team, which has offices across central Maryland, of illegally accepting payments from Lakeview Title in exchange for sending the firm business. "We are pleased with the court's ruling, and we will continue to to vigorously prosecute this class action on behalf of our clients," said the couple's attorney, Gregory T. Lawrence of Baltimore law firm Conti Fenn & Lawrence.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | February 15, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Legislation that would require title companies to give the state a significant chunk of their income got a major boost this week from a decision by a legal disciplinary board.Thanks to an opinion by the Maryland Attorney Grievance Commission,lawyers who set up title companies may keep the interest earned when they briefly hold their clients' money in trust accounts.The interest builds when a person buys a home and passes the purchase money first through the title company and then to the seller.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2012
An Ellicott City woman pleaded guilty to wire fraud Wednesday for misusing more than $1.5 million in mortgage closing funds, federal prosecutors announced. Harriet M. Taylor, 56, faces a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison and a $1 million fine for comingling mortgage lenders' money that should have been in escrow accounts with the operating accounts of two Columbia title insurance companies, according to a statement from Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Taylor co-owned and managed the companies, Regal Title Co. LLC and Loyalty Title Co. LLC, the statement said.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 14, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Members of a Senate panel were given a choice yesterday between putting the screws to homebuyers, already suffering from high closing costs, or denying money to fund legal services for the poor.That, at least, was how advocates and opponents of Senate Bill 573 characterized the legislation during a hearing before the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee yesterday. The committee is expected to vote on the bill in the next few weeks.The bill would require title companies, which conduct real estate settlements, to donate to the Maryland Legal Services Corp.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
A real estate title company in Severna Park and Ocean City was shut down after as much as $2 million from its escrow account for property settlements allegedly turned up missing, according to court documents and state regulators. Maryland Insurance Commissioner Ralph S. Tyler ordered yesterday that business licenses for Day Title Inc. and owner Deborah A. Williams be suspended and revoked. The Maryland Insurance Administration issues licenses and regulates title companies, which conduct real estate closings.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | April 1, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland title companies came one important step closer yesterday to losing the interest they earn on client escrow accounts, as a House committee approved a bill to encourage affordable housing.The Maryland Affordable Housing Trust would be established under a measure that the House Ways and Means Committee passed by a 2-to-1 ratio yesterday. Funding for the trust would come from the interest title companies earn when they hold clients' money in escrow.The housing trust would award money to buy, build or preserve affordable housing, and would help other non-profit organizations that support affordable housing.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2003
A new name decorates the skyline at The Mall in Columbia, one that is homegrown. Fountainhead Title Group, founded in Columbia in 1975, has taken over the former One Columbia Center on the outer rim of The Mall for its headquarters, affixing its name to the side of the building. The expansion of the state's largest title company occurs during a rapid growth spurt. Fountainhead has more than tripled its business in the past four years and anticipates more growth. The company plans to open up to seven offices in the next six months, bringing its total to 35, and expects to hire at least 100 people in the next year, said William Yerman, president of the company's Maryland Division.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | March 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Title companies again narrowly avoided yesterday being forced to give up the interest they earn on their clients' escrow accounts.By a 12-10 vote, the House Ways and Means Committee agreed not to use title company interest as the source of funding for the proposed Maryland Affordable Housing Trust, a fund that would help pay for affordable housing in Maryland.For years, title companies have fought a turf battle with law firms over the interest earned on client escrow accounts.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | April 3, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Despite the threat of higher home closing costs, the General Assembly yesterday approved a bill that would require title companies to donate their escrow account interest to a new fund for affordable housing.The 81-53 vote by the House of Delegates sent Senate Bill 594 to the governor for his likely signature. And it ended a five-year battle between law firms and title companies, who sought to protect what they argue is their money.The money -- small amounts of interest earned when a title company holds a client's home purchase money in an escrow account -- will go to a fund to establish housing for the poor.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2011
A 29-year-old College Park man was sentenced Monday in federal court to more than five years in prison for defrauding a mortgage company that made loans on six Baltimore properties. Dema Daiga was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Marvin C. Garbis, who ordered Daiga to pay restitution of $664,493 and a special assessment of $1,200. The sentence, which is to be followed by three years of supervised release, also included two counts of aggravated identity theft. According to testimony, Daiga and another mortgage broker, Laurel resident Olu Campbell, also known as Oluseun Oshosanya, 30, recruited "straw" purchasers and used names of four others, without their knowledge, to apply for mortgages on six properties.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
The 44-year-old owner of a Baltimore County title company pleaded guilty Friday to wire fraud related to a scheme to defraud homeowners, lenders and a title insurance company of more than $2.2 million. A federal grand jury charged Daniel E. Fink Jr. of Baltimore, owner of Homemaxx Title & Escrow LLC, in March 2009 with wire fraud and money laundering. According to the plea agreement, Fink arranged for his company to do title work for residential closings and refinancings, then concealed crucial facts about title insurance issued to homebuyers or borrowers who refinanced.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
The owner of a Towson title agency was sentenced to more than six years in federal prison for defrauding lenders out of $3.9 million in eight months, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced Friday. Anthony V. Weis, 45, pleaded guilty to charges of mail and wire fraud and was ordered to report to the U.S. Bureau of Prisons to begin his sentence May 17. The president of Maple Leaf Title also was ordered to pay $4 million in restitution to 13 victims and their insurance companies.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2011
Maryland regulators said Wednesday that they have suspended the license of a Crofton-based title company after learning that more than $1 million meant to be held aside for real estate transactions was instead used to pay business expenses. John J. Dwyer and Joseph C. Hughes, co-owners of Beltway Title and Abstract Inc. and related settlement companies, did not appear at a hearing Wednesday to defend themselves, the Maryland Insurance Administration said. Licenses for all the firms were suspended.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
From the Real Estate Wonk blog: WA bunch of Maryland ground-rent owners were shocked when they discovered, too late, that they had to register their property by Sept. 29 of last year or it would cease to exist . One of those owners got a second surprise when he noticed that the state declared in its tax booklet -- incorrectly, as it happens -- that the deadline was September of this year. Colleague Andrea Siegel reports on that oopsie here here, which some ground-rent advocates say is adding to confusion about the law. Just after the actual deadline passed, I heard from about half a dozen people who say they didn't know and don't see why the state thought its occasional public notices were sufficient.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 6, 2010
John Joseph Neubauer Jr., a retired attorney who owned a real estate title firm, died of cancer Tuesday at his Ocean City home. He was 74 and had lived in Ruxton and Cambridge. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Cedarcroft section of North Baltimore, he was the son of John J. Neubauer Sr., who was also a real estate attorney. The younger Mr. Neubauer attended Mount Washington Country School for Boys and was a 1954 graduate of Loyola High School, where he played basketball. He earned a degree at what is now Loyola University Maryland and his law degree from the University of Maryland.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | April 1, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland title companies came one important step closer yesterday to losing the interest they earn on client escrow accounts, as a House committee approved a bill to encourage affordable housing.The Maryland Affordable Housing Trust would be established under a measure that the House Ways and Means Committee passed by a 2-to-1 ratio yesterday. Funding for the trust would come from the interest title companies earn when they hold clients' money in escrow.The housing trust would award money to buy, build or preserve affordable housing, and would help other non-profit organizations that support affordable housing.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau | February 19, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland's title companies won Round One in a legislative fight that they said threatened to raise home settlement costs by imposing millions of dollars in taxes on the industry.The victory came from Sen. Walter M. Baker, D-Cecil, the sponsor of a bill that would have required title companies to pay the state some of the interest they earn by holding client trust accounts.Currently, law firms, which do many of the same real estate settlement services as title companies, must give up that earned interest to the non-profit Maryland Legal Services Corp.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
Ground rents that are not registered with the state by today will cease to exist under state law, one of the changes prompted by a Baltimore Sun investigation into the centuries-old system. The state estimates that investors hold ground leases on about 115,000 properties in Maryland, mostly in Baltimore, entitling them to collect small rents on the land from the homeowners. More than 65,000 have been registered since the state Department of Assessments and Taxation began taking applications in 2007.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.