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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 4, 1990
About halfway through "Titian: Prince of Painters" at Washington's National Gallery (through Jan. 27), the visitor enters a gallery devoted to the painter's mythological works, and is surrounded by Titian's vision of woman in all her sumptuous sensuality.There is "Danae" (1544) the monumental nude whose flesh radiates warmth and light and whose plump pillows echo the roundnesses of her body.There is "Venus with an Organist and a Dog" (1550), that curious painting in which Venus lies before a sunset landscape as unconscious of her nudity as of the organist who, fully clothed and symbolically sworded, turns from his playing to gaze openly at her.There is "Venus with a Mirror" (about 1555)
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | August 6, 2006
It is Easter Sunday morning and Mary Magdalena, the repentant sinner who renounced her old way of life to follow Christ, has come to mourn at his tomb. But he is no longer there: The stone sealing the entrance has been moved, and when Mary peers inside she is astonished to find the burial vault empty. Suddenly, a voice from behind her beckons and, turning, she recognizes the resurrected Christ standing before her. Overcome with emotion, she falls on her knees and reaches out to touch his garment; but he draws back saying, "Noli me tangere" -- do not touch me -- for he will soon join his heavenly father and is no longer of this world.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | August 6, 2006
It is Easter Sunday morning and Mary Magdalena, the repentant sinner who renounced her old way of life to follow Christ, has come to mourn at his tomb. But he is no longer there: The stone sealing the entrance has been moved, and when Mary peers inside she is astonished to find the burial vault empty. Suddenly, a voice from behind her beckons and, turning, she recognizes the resurrected Christ standing before her. Overcome with emotion, she falls on her knees and reaches out to touch his garment; but he draws back saying, "Noli me tangere" -- do not touch me -- for he will soon join his heavenly father and is no longer of this world.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2006
Renaissance masters The lowdown -- Giorgio Vasari, the first art historian of the Italian Renaissance, reported that the leading artists of Florence dismissed their Venetian counterparts as mere colorists who lacked the essential skill of drawing. But oh what gorgeous hues painters such as Titian, Giorgione and Bellini managed to wring from their palettes! Bellini's sweet-faced Madonnas rivaled those of Raphael himself for purity of expression, while Titian and Giorgione's irresistibly rosy nymphs and sensual goddesses were painted with a voluptuous surrender to the pangs of love that has never been surpassed.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | July 16, 2006
There's nothing like a good cleaning to make a 400-year-old painting by Titian or Veronese shine again. But the same sort of careful refurbishment can work wonders on more recent works as well, such as the lovely 1985 Maryland landscape by Eugene Leake that's a highlight of the group show Summer '06 at C. Grimaldis Gallery. SUMMER '06 -- Through Aug. 19 -- C. Grimaldis Gallery, 523 N. Charles St. -- 410-539-1080.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2006
Renaissance masters The lowdown -- Giorgio Vasari, the first art historian of the Italian Renaissance, reported that the leading artists of Florence dismissed their Venetian counterparts as mere colorists who lacked the essential skill of drawing. But oh what gorgeous hues painters such as Titian, Giorgione and Bellini managed to wring from their palettes! Bellini's sweet-faced Madonnas rivaled those of Raphael himself for purity of expression, while Titian and Giorgione's irresistibly rosy nymphs and sensual goddesses were painted with a voluptuous surrender to the pangs of love that has never been surpassed.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2000
It seems likely that more music, secular and non-secular, has been inspired by the celebration of Christmas than any other event. Too often, those putting on concerts during the holiday season stick religiously to the material that has long enjoyed evergreen status, rather than dig around for something less familiar, or a fresh take on something very familiar. The neat thing about the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's holiday program, which has another performance Wednesday, is the way it does both.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 18, 1994
The imagination of Stephen Sondheim has yielded some of the stiffest artistic challenges Broadway has ever known.His subject matter is always weighty, his melodies tend to emerge in short, motivic bursts that don't always provide much for the singer to grab onto, his devilish rhythms are as close as Broadway gets to Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring." And absolutely all of this complexity must speak with an expressive authority worthy of the most literate lyricist of them all.So, if Mr. Sondheim's "A Little Night Music" is on your agenda, you'd better be drowning in talent, because you're going to need That is exactly the case with the "Night Music" now in production at the Colonial Players of Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | March 9, 2003
On Blondes, by Joanna Pitman. Bloomsbury. 320 pages. $24.95. I was the sole blonde in my class at the small Catholic girls' school I attended. Each year when the class photo was taken for the year book I was singled out by the photographer to be the center of the photo -- the student pointing to the map, the blackboard, the art exhibit -- with all of my non-blond classmates as my audience. A sun and her (no doubt resentful) satellites. Joanna Pitman would be unsurprised by this recounting, nor similar stories I or other blondes might have to tell.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 2, 1994
Ask Bud Leake what he thinks of his life, and his answer reveals something essential about the man. "I'm one of the luckiest people who ever lived, I would say."In fact, Leake is a walking example that people make their luck."He's the most positive person I know," says fellow artist Raoul Middleman.At 82, Eugene W. Leake Jr. can look back on a life of notable accomplishment as artist and administrator. When he became president of the Maryland Institute, College of Art in 1961, it had fallen on sad days.
NEWS
By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | July 16, 2006
There's nothing like a good cleaning to make a 400-year-old painting by Titian or Veronese shine again. But the same sort of careful refurbishment can work wonders on more recent works as well, such as the lovely 1985 Maryland landscape by Eugene Leake that's a highlight of the group show Summer '06 at C. Grimaldis Gallery. SUMMER '06 -- Through Aug. 19 -- C. Grimaldis Gallery, 523 N. Charles St. -- 410-539-1080.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | March 9, 2003
On Blondes, by Joanna Pitman. Bloomsbury. 320 pages. $24.95. I was the sole blonde in my class at the small Catholic girls' school I attended. Each year when the class photo was taken for the year book I was singled out by the photographer to be the center of the photo -- the student pointing to the map, the blackboard, the art exhibit -- with all of my non-blond classmates as my audience. A sun and her (no doubt resentful) satellites. Joanna Pitman would be unsurprised by this recounting, nor similar stories I or other blondes might have to tell.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2000
It seems likely that more music, secular and non-secular, has been inspired by the celebration of Christmas than any other event. Too often, those putting on concerts during the holiday season stick religiously to the material that has long enjoyed evergreen status, rather than dig around for something less familiar, or a fresh take on something very familiar. The neat thing about the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra's holiday program, which has another performance Wednesday, is the way it does both.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | March 18, 1994
The imagination of Stephen Sondheim has yielded some of the stiffest artistic challenges Broadway has ever known.His subject matter is always weighty, his melodies tend to emerge in short, motivic bursts that don't always provide much for the singer to grab onto, his devilish rhythms are as close as Broadway gets to Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring." And absolutely all of this complexity must speak with an expressive authority worthy of the most literate lyricist of them all.So, if Mr. Sondheim's "A Little Night Music" is on your agenda, you'd better be drowning in talent, because you're going to need That is exactly the case with the "Night Music" now in production at the Colonial Players of Annapolis.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 2, 1994
Ask Bud Leake what he thinks of his life, and his answer reveals something essential about the man. "I'm one of the luckiest people who ever lived, I would say."In fact, Leake is a walking example that people make their luck."He's the most positive person I know," says fellow artist Raoul Middleman.At 82, Eugene W. Leake Jr. can look back on a life of notable accomplishment as artist and administrator. When he became president of the Maryland Institute, College of Art in 1961, it had fallen on sad days.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 4, 1990
About halfway through "Titian: Prince of Painters" at Washington's National Gallery (through Jan. 27), the visitor enters a gallery devoted to the painter's mythological works, and is surrounded by Titian's vision of woman in all her sumptuous sensuality.There is "Danae" (1544) the monumental nude whose flesh radiates warmth and light and whose plump pillows echo the roundnesses of her body.There is "Venus with an Organist and a Dog" (1550), that curious painting in which Venus lies before a sunset landscape as unconscious of her nudity as of the organist who, fully clothed and symbolically sworded, turns from his playing to gaze openly at her.There is "Venus with a Mirror" (about 1555)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 6, 1991
WashingtonBaltimoreans who know their museum collections will find an old friend virtually enthroned in glory in Washington these days. Proceeding through the "Anthony Van Dyck" exhibition at the National Gallery (through Feb. 24), one turns at a certain point and sees at the end of a three-gallery-long vista the grand, the glorious "Rinaldo and Armida" from the Epstein collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art.Painted for Charles I of England in 1629, one of the works that persuaded the king to invite Van Dyck to England as his court painter, "Rinaldo and Armida" is the centerpiece of this exhibit of more than 100 works.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 26, 2000
The holiday music season will move into high gear as soon as Thanksgiving turkey leftovers hit the fridge. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra gets things started with a nicely offbeat program that includes Marc-Antoine Charpentier's "Noels pour les instruments" and the world premiere of Ray Sprenkle's "Reflections on Titian's 'Assumption.' " Anne Harrigan will conduct the performances at 8 p.m. Friday and Dec. 6 and 2 p.m. Dec. 3 at St. Mary's Seminary Chapel, Roland Avenue and Northern Parkway.
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