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March 15, 1997
Ashurst Technology Ltd. has received a two-year, $142,000 contract from a Connecticut company to develop a lightweight titanium that could be used in the aerospace industry.Baltimore-based Ashurst said yesterday that the contract with United Technologies Research Center is part of a government research grant."We are taking titanium and its alloys and intentionally making it look like a sponge while getting it to maintain strength," said Timothy Langan, technical director of Ashurst Government Services Inc., a subsidiary of Ashurst.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | July 5, 2009
Normally, all the outdoors needs for a soundtrack is nature itself. Wind blowing, leaves rustling, birds chirping - you get the picture. But every so often, the situation requires Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. Or Hank Williams. Maybe you got stuck with setting up the tent or doing the dishes. Perhaps you're watching fireworks from a kayak and would like a little 1812 Overture. Whatever the scene, the iMainGo 2 portable speaker system has you and your MP3 player covered. Smaller than most paperback books, iMainGo 2 is hinged like a clamshell that holds the music player on one side and has titanium speakers on the other.
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NEWS
By Andrea Gerlin and Andrea Gerlin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 2000
BILBAO, Spain - Rarely has a new building enjoyed as much acclaim as the Guggenheim Museum's newest branch did when it opened on the esplanade along the River Nervion here in 1997. Its shining fish-scale exterior was lavishly praised by international critics, putting this industrial port city on the map for thousands of tourists. Architect Frank O. Gehry's bold design earned him near-mythic status in his profession, and one of his most eminent rivals, architect Philip Johnson, called it the "greatest building of our time."
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | July 17, 2008
You have written columns suggesting use of sunscreens with microparticles of zinc or titanium. I read that some scientists are concerned about nanoparticles found in products such as sunscreen. These particles are so tiny, they could get into places in our bodies that larger particles can't. No one knows how dangerous this might be, but some experts suggest we exercise caution and avoid nanotechnology in products such as sunscreen. Shouldn't you warn people about the danger? The Environmental Working Group is a collaborative group of scientists that first raised a red flag about nanoparticles in sunscreens.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1998
"I remember screaming out of shock, and then I went numb," Atholton lineman Matt Pearce said. "I landed on my stomach, and when they turned me over to put me on the stretcher, it was the worst pain I ever felt."Pearce was describing his reaction to breaking his right thighbone (femur) during a game against Wilde Lake last Oct. 25. The injury happened in the second half during a kick return on a wet field. A Wilde Lake player slipped and fell on him."I was having my best game of the season with 10 tackles," said Pearce, a 6-foot-2, 225-pound tackle.
NEWS
By Rod Stafford Hagwood | January 18, 2004
Manly men don't know beans about fine jewelry, with the exception that buying it for a woman can get you out of most jams. Ask Kobe Bryant. But that is changing, thanks in large part to the bling-bling that rappers and athletes bring to the game. "There's starting to be a trend with men's jewelry," says Ken Hash, jewelry buyer at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium. "Lots of silver and white-gold rings are popular." At Goldstar Jewelry in Mondawmin Mall in Baltimore, owner Oren Orbach notices the popularity of jewelry among men. In fact, his clientele is 70 percent male.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
Millennium Chemicals Inc., whose largest division is in Hunt Valley, said yesterday that it is closing a 40-person facility in Cincinnati and moving jobs to Maryland. The company will take a $10 million charge in the first half of the year because of the closure, but expects to make that up in later cost savings. "This is good news for Baltimore," said Robert E. Lee, head of Maryland operations, adding that it should mean about two dozen more jobs for the area. A handful of positions - fewer than five - will be cut in Maryland under the restructuring.
SPORTS
BY ANDY BRUMER and BY ANDY BRUMER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2005
GOLF IS a weighting game, as the positioning of a few grams here or there in a driver, iron, fairway metal or even a putter can dramatically affect the direction, distance and trajectory of a shot. Yet golfers need wait no longer, as today's top equipment manufacturers have fine-tuned their clubs to the degree that they all but guarantee a better ball-striking experience for players of every skill level. The golfers' task remains to select the clubs that best complement their swing styles, which they can best do by trying them either during a demonstration day at a driving range or at retail outlets with indoor hitting bays.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Lyondell Chemical Co. might sell its Hawkins Point plant, which makes white pigment for everything from printer paper to the writing on M&Ms, as part of a restructuring of its inorganic chemicals business. A decision is to be made "in the coming weeks," Chief Financial Officer T. Kevin DeNicola said during a conference call with analysts yesterday to discuss fourth-quarter and year-end financial results. "We continue to consider all our options to be open," he said, and those might include a sale, a joint venture or continued ownership.
NEWS
By Kevin Cowherd | May 15, 1997
Golfers are sick people. Every one of us has the same recurring fantasy: If only we had better equipment, we'd stop slicing our drives into the next area code and shanking 3-irons and sending bunker shots screaming over the green like SAM missiles. Pretty soon we'd be driving the ball 300 yards down the middle and sticking 50-yard wedge shots within 2 feet of the pin and all our putts would start dropping. And then in a few months, we'd be good enough to qualify for the PGA Tour and a short while later, hell, we'd be breathing down the necks of the big boys, Tiger Woods and Mark O'Meara and Tom Lehman and that choking dog, Greg Norman.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Los Angeles Times | April 22, 2007
ELCIEGO, SPAIN / / The theatrical, floor-to-ceiling, merlot-colored drapes at the Marques de Riscal would suit a production of Hedda Gabler or Hamlet. But this is not a tragedy. This is a guestroom at the first and only hotel designed by Frank Gehry. When the curtains part at the push of a button, you see a picture window with angular contours, erratically tilted panes and a zigzagging window seat. The undercarriage of the roof, wrapped in pink, gold and silver titanium ribbons, is visible in the foreground, and in the distance lies the sleepy stone village of Elciego, surrounded by soldierly vineyards of northern Spain's Rioja wine country.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Lyondell Chemical Co. might sell its Hawkins Point plant, which makes white pigment for everything from printer paper to the writing on M&Ms, as part of a restructuring of its inorganic chemicals business. A decision is to be made "in the coming weeks," Chief Financial Officer T. Kevin DeNicola said during a conference call with analysts yesterday to discuss fourth-quarter and year-end financial results. "We continue to consider all our options to be open," he said, and those might include a sale, a joint venture or continued ownership.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER AND LYNN ANDERSON and MICHAEL DRESSER AND LYNN ANDERSON,SUN REPORTERS | October 19, 2005
Terrorist threat or not, Lorraine Lewis of Baltimore was determined to get to her hair stylist in Laurel yesterday for her regular cut and curl. "No, no, no - I am not going to cancel this appointment," Lewis, 32, said as she waited in her Hyundai sedan on a ramp leading to the Fort McHenry Tunnel - desperate for some salon TLC. She was among thousands of motorists who found themselves stuck yesterday when the approaches to two of Baltimore Harbor's three...
SPORTS
BY ANDY BRUMER and BY ANDY BRUMER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 4, 2005
GOLF IS a weighting game, as the positioning of a few grams here or there in a driver, iron, fairway metal or even a putter can dramatically affect the direction, distance and trajectory of a shot. Yet golfers need wait no longer, as today's top equipment manufacturers have fine-tuned their clubs to the degree that they all but guarantee a better ball-striking experience for players of every skill level. The golfers' task remains to select the clubs that best complement their swing styles, which they can best do by trying them either during a demonstration day at a driving range or at retail outlets with indoor hitting bays.
NEWS
By Rod Stafford Hagwood | January 18, 2004
Manly men don't know beans about fine jewelry, with the exception that buying it for a woman can get you out of most jams. Ask Kobe Bryant. But that is changing, thanks in large part to the bling-bling that rappers and athletes bring to the game. "There's starting to be a trend with men's jewelry," says Ken Hash, jewelry buyer at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium. "Lots of silver and white-gold rings are popular." At Goldstar Jewelry in Mondawmin Mall in Baltimore, owner Oren Orbach notices the popularity of jewelry among men. In fact, his clientele is 70 percent male.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
Ronald Smith's heart had grown so weak that he could barely cross the room without gasping for air. Knowing he could die before a donor heart became available, surgeons created a small channel in his lower left chamber in December and planted a battery-sized pump inside. The plastic-and-titanium turbine gave his heart a needed boost, keeping him alive until a new organ turned up a month later. "It bridged me from being down and out cold to being able to function," said Smith, 54, who got his transplant in January at the University of Maryland Medical Center and is doing well at home in Clinton.
SPORTS
By John W. Stewart | September 26, 1990
The idea is to build a better mousetrap.The adage about doing that and the world will beat a path to your door certainly applies to the golf industry.This was evident during the first Golf Merchandise Show of the Eastern United States, which ended a three-day run at the Convention Center yesterday.The key words seemed to be high-tech and aerodynamics.There is a Hi-Tech Golf Co., and salesmen of a variety of products, including clubs and balls, can't get through their pitches without using the terms.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | July 5, 2009
Normally, all the outdoors needs for a soundtrack is nature itself. Wind blowing, leaves rustling, birds chirping - you get the picture. But every so often, the situation requires Eine Kleine Nachtmusik. Or Hank Williams. Maybe you got stuck with setting up the tent or doing the dishes. Perhaps you're watching fireworks from a kayak and would like a little 1812 Overture. Whatever the scene, the iMainGo 2 portable speaker system has you and your MP3 player covered. Smaller than most paperback books, iMainGo 2 is hinged like a clamshell that holds the music player on one side and has titanium speakers on the other.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
Millennium Chemicals Inc., whose largest division is in Hunt Valley, said yesterday that it is closing a 40-person facility in Cincinnati and moving jobs to Maryland. The company will take a $10 million charge in the first half of the year because of the closure, but expects to make that up in later cost savings. "This is good news for Baltimore," said Robert E. Lee, head of Maryland operations, adding that it should mean about two dozen more jobs for the area. A handful of positions - fewer than five - will be cut in Maryland under the restructuring.
NEWS
By Andrea Gerlin and Andrea Gerlin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 2000
BILBAO, Spain - Rarely has a new building enjoyed as much acclaim as the Guggenheim Museum's newest branch did when it opened on the esplanade along the River Nervion here in 1997. Its shining fish-scale exterior was lavishly praised by international critics, putting this industrial port city on the map for thousands of tourists. Architect Frank O. Gehry's bold design earned him near-mythic status in his profession, and one of his most eminent rivals, architect Philip Johnson, called it the "greatest building of our time."
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