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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday that beginning next week it would regulate the sale of bone, skin and other tissues used for transplants to help protect recipients from infection with the virus that causes AIDS.Two years ago, officials found that a Virginia donor who died in a 1985 shooting had been infected with HIV, even though two tests on his blood before the removal of his organs and tissues did not detect the human immunodeficiency virus. Three people who had received transplants from the donor later died of AIDS.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Last week, Diana Nyad and Sean Avery got the boot. Please, please let's put Billy Dee out of his misery this week. The guest judge is Robin Roberts. LOVE HER. It's also "tell your sob story/backstory" night. DON'T LOVE THAT.  Uh oh, Billy Dee Williams is backstage. This does not bode well. James Maslow & Peta Murgatroyd Jive James used to be chubby kid. In 2007, he overcame bullying - it's unclear if he got skinny and the bullying stopped or the other way around.
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NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1999
A team of scientists at a small Baltimore biotechnology company has made a breakthrough in the effort to develop revolutionary new treatments to regenerate bone, cartilage, fat and other structural and connective tissues damaged by injury or disease.The team at Osiris Therapeutics Inc. has shown for the first time that progenitor, or "master" cells, which give rise to all other cells in the body, can be prodded in the laboratory into becoming replacement bone, cartilage, fat and other cells.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
SARASOTA, FLA. -- Third baseman Manny Machado, who is rehabbing from left knee surgery in October, has not run in five days due to discomfort caused by the breaking up of scar tissue - a setback that makes an already optimistic return by Opening Day seem even more tenuous. “Certainly, it looks [like Opening Day is out]. I'm not there yet,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said. “I'm not going to throw that wet blanket over that yet. I know Manny's not.” Showalter said although it may seem ominous, the delay in running is a precautionary measure and something that can occur with these type of surgeries.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 1996
Federal health officials yesterday proposed new guidelines for transplants of animal organs and tissues into humans, responding to concerns about their potential for causing outbreaks of new and previously known diseases.The guidelines "aim to walk a tightrope" in protecting public health while not impeding promising research efforts to find new ways to alleviate the shortage of human donor organs and tissues, said Dr. David A. Kessler, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | December 26, 1992
Around the housedTC* Keep warranties from Christmas gifts in an accordion folder and organize them by category. They will be easily accessible when needed.* Clean dirt and grime from telephone at least once a month. Use a diluted disinfectant cleaner solution in a plastic spray bottle. Do not spray solution into transmitter holes. Spray top, sides of receiver and the base of the unit. Wipe dry with a clean cloth.* Soak washable candle holders such as glass or ceramic in hot water to remove accumulated wax. Rub wax off when it has softened.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 30, 1990
In a series of bold experiments, scientists have created laboratory mice with tiny human organ structures -- lungs, intestines, pancreases, lymph nodes, thymuses, livers and immune systems. The purpose is to study the viruses of human diseases in living human tissues.The animals, whose organ tissues are derived from those of human fetuses, provide a singular opportunity to gauge the effectiveness of various antiviral drugs. The mice have been successfully infected with the AIDS virus and with two cancer viruses that cause leukemia.
FEATURES
By Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D. and Modena Wilson, M.D. and Alain Joffe, M.D.,Special to The Sun | July 5, 1994
Q: When my toddler takes a nap, she sleeps on her stomach. When she wakes up, her face and eyes are red and swollen. Why? Is she allergic to something in the bed?A: A "puffy" face on waking is common. Although we've never seen a formal explanation, we think mild swelling of the facial tissues can be explained by what is known about blood circulation.The smallest blood vessels, the capillaries that wind their way through body tissues, are somewhat leaky. A small amount of liquid from the blood seeps out. It tends to collect where tissues are loose.
NEWS
May 23, 1991
The death of two organ transplant recipients from AIDS is a clear reminder of the insidious nature of this human immunodeficiency virus. The donor, a 22-year-old Virginia man, was shot to death during a robbery in 1985. Doctors who recommended using his organs to help other people live had no way of knowing the murder victim had contracted AIDS, because his tissues reportedly tested negative for the virus.That didn't tell the whole story, it turns out. The man apparently contracted the disease shortly before he was killed.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | December 3, 1991
Q: My brother was recently told that he has Hodgkin's disease. I would appreciate more information on this disease and how it is treated.A: Hodgkin's disease is a type of lymphoma (malignant tumors of the lymphatic system) that includes lymph nodes and the spleen. Hodgkin's disease accounts for about one in 100 cancers in this country, and most commonly occurs in people between the ages of 15 and 35, or older than 50. Painless, progressive enlargement of lymph nodes in the neck is often the first manifestation of the disease.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Women with dense breast tissue will now get an extra warning about cancer. Dense breast tissue, while common in women, can make it harder to detect breast cancer . A new state law requires doctors to send women with dense breast tissue a special letter warning of the danger. Together the patient and doctor can decide on what type of screening should be done. Dr. Diana Pack, a radiologist at Anne Arundel Medical Center, explains the new law. What are requirements of the new breast density law and when did it go into effect?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassandra Berube | July 22, 2013
Can you forgive someone who tried to kill you? How far do the bonds of family bend until they break? This season, Debra has been struggling with killing LaGuerta, wishing she had killed Dexter instead. Vogel brings her back to the site of the incident to help her get through it. Part of her recuperation is watching an old session of Vogel with Harry as he tried to work through living with Dexter. Dexter has stayed away, trying to give Deb some space, but he insists that he needs Deb in his life.
EXPLORE
November 14, 2012
In response to your letter to the editor on dinosaurs not being around 67 million years ago ("Bloody evidence undercuts dogmatic view of dinosaurs," Nov. 8): Yes, Dr. Mary Schweitzer's article in Dec. 6, 2010 Scientific American does talk about her finding preserved soft tissue in a fossil ... but it also says that fossil was 67 million years old. Elizabeth Reindollar Laurel
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Sherrie Walter will never wear earrings again, but recently started styling her hair in a ponytail the way she used to before she was diagnosed with skin cancer nearly four years ago. It's a big step for Walter, whose life was turned upside down when doctors finally figured out the persistent sore in her ear was actually basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of cancer. By then it had spread so much that the Bel Air mother of two had to have part of her skull and most of her left ear removed.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | June 29, 2012
Nick Johnson said a MRI on his sprained right wrist showed only scar tissue, meaning there is no new damage to a wrist he has injured multiple times. “Nothing torn or any of that stuff,” said Johnson, who hurt the wrist on a swing Wednesday. “So that's a pretty good sign.” Johnson said he will have to wear a brace for at least seven days and then be re-evaluated. He doesn't know a specific timeline for a return yet. “Keep this brace on for a week, take some pills and we'll see how it goes in a week,” he said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2011
Marc Miller survived a motorcycle crash in October near his Baltimore County home, but his foot had been dragged along the pavement and badly damaged. That injury would require both the most advanced medicine and an ancient therapy — leeches. Trauma doctors at Johns Hopkins, the University of Maryland and other U.S. hospitals routinely use leeches as a temporary measure to keep blood flowing as new vessels grow in a damaged area. The animals kept blood moving in and out of a new skin flap sewn onto Miller's foot.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,HARTFORD COURANT | February 11, 2001
Most of us know that summer weather can put us at risk for dehydration if we don't get enough fluids. But drinking plenty of water each day is just as important in winter. According to a report from the Health Care Financing Administration, dehydration is a frequent cause of hospitalization among people over 65, and research shows that about half of those hospitalized for dehydration die within a year. Nearly a third of all cases of serious dehydration result from pneumonia and flu, which peak during the winter.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Universal Press Syndicate | July 15, 1991
When the news came that President Zachary Taylor had, in fact, not been poisoned by arsenic, I called my best sources on the history of embalming practices, Edward and Gail Johnson, who are funeral directors in Chicago.It was from the Johnsons that I first learned about the perils that embalming techniques posed for crime detection in the 19th century. Because the embalming solutions commonly used then were poisons, the procedure made it all too easy to disguise a crime.Arsenic, one of the more notorious poisons, was a popular embalming fluid in this country through the end of the 19th century.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | February 18, 2010
Sixty years after Henrietta Lacks died of cervical cancer, the Baltimore County woman's cells live on in laboratories around the globe. Collected by Johns Hopkins researchers as she was being treated, the cells grew incessantly and have since helped scientists make blockbuster medical advances, including cancer treatments and the polio vaccine. Decades passed before anyone told Lacks' relatives of her enduring gift to modern science. And while the advances that have come from her cells are worth millions, her family never received a cent.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
In a car wreck, the dashboard crushes the driver's knees and takes a divot out of his cartilage. Or, on a battlefield, shrapnel tears flesh from a soldier's face and a slice from the cornea of his eye. Surgeons will do their best to repair these injuries. But bioengineers are working toward a future in which a combination of surgery and new materials will coax stem cells and the body's own repair mechanisms to regenerate tissues that trauma has taken away. Among those in the forefront of the research is Jennifer Elisseeff, an associate professor in the biomedical engineering department at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.
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