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By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 25, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- Jam-packed with soldiers of every description, with relief workers, with camera crews, with reporters from around the globe and with refugees from Kosovo who keep coming and coming, this capital of a nation on the edge of a war is alive with possibility.Austrian army officers flock to the Austrian restaurant; Italian police, pistols on their hips, crowd the Italian restaurant; British army vehicles jostle for room on the rubble-strewn roads with white aid-agency cars; helicopters fly this way and that to the delight of little boys playing on the heaps of abandoned construction sites.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- In two small, dank rooms without cooking facilities or running water, Musa Qoqaj and 44 relatives sleep cheek-to-shoulder each night on a cold concrete floor with only dreams and memories to distract them from their plight.For their place of refuge, the once-prosperous baker and his extended family pay more than $250 a month -- a princely sum in impoverished Albania and an example of the exhausted generosity of a nation that has become host to more than 400,000 refugees from a richer land.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- In two small, dank rooms without cooking facilities or running water, Musa Qoqaj and 44 relatives sleep cheek-to-shoulder each night on a cold concrete floor with only dreams and memories to distract them from their plight.For their place of refuge, the once-prosperous baker and his extended family pay more than $250 a month -- a princely sum in impoverished Albania and an example of the exhausted generosity of a nation that has become host to more than 400,000 refugees from a richer land.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 13, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- The first shot did not stop him. Neither did the second or the third. But by the 23rd bullet, Agron Berisha was on the ground, awake and waiting to die.Now the 22-year-old soldier is recuperating in the six-room apartment where, for the past eight months, the Kosovo Liberation Army has sent its wounded to heal. Scores of foot soldiers and a few KLA officers have been treated at what they call "the hospital," where most of the medicine is dangerously outdated and the intravenous stands are rusty with age.KLA doctors visit daily, but surgery and other serious medical procedures are performed at the Albanian military hospital on the outskirts of the capital, Tirana.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 4, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- Exhausted and working amid the smell of unwashed clothes, vomit and baby diapers, Fitor Mucha, a coordinator with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, has given up counting the Kosovar Albanians streaming daily into this 800-seat gymnasium."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 26, 1993
TIRANA, Albania -- It was a hallelujah yesterday for Europe's poorest nation: Pope John Paul II came in golden robes to celebrate a national resurrection. There can have been few spring days in the past half-century as exalting for a Balkan land so long self-consumed by tyranny, isolation and the systematic persecution of all religion.Improbability reigned for a day in a time-stood-still place whose Communist leaders once proclaimed the world's first officially atheistic nation.The world's most famous Albanian, octogenarian apostle of the poor, Mother Teresa of Calcutta, humbly came in sandals and her trademark blue-and-white habit.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 13, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- The first shot did not stop him. Neither did the second or the third. But by the 23rd bullet, Agron Berisha was on the ground, awake and waiting to die.Now the 22-year-old soldier is recuperating in the six-room apartment where, for the past eight months, the Kosovo Liberation Army has sent its wounded to heal. Scores of foot soldiers and a few KLA officers have been treated at what they call "the hospital," where most of the medicine is dangerously outdated and the intravenous stands are rusty with age.KLA doctors visit daily, but surgery and other serious medical procedures are performed at the Albanian military hospital on the outskirts of the capital, Tirana.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 31, 1992
TIRANA, Albania -- For nearly a half-century, they kept their origins a secret. They hid their birth certificates, their passports and their Social Security cards deep in a drawer somewhere. Now they clamor for recognition at the gates of the new U.S. Embassy.Much to the surprise of U.S. officials, it appears that as many as 400 Americans were trapped inside Albania during the Communists' 45-year-long isolationist reign. Only now, with the opening of a U.S. Embassy in Tirana, are they able to claim their birthright.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1996
In one day, Martineta Leka made $200 selling hot dogs from her hot dog stand.But the money was just part of a computer simulation Leka and three other Albanian high school teachers were using at Anne Arundel Community College."
NEWS
October 16, 1997
Philip Ravenhill,52, chief curator at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of African Art for the past 10 years, died of a heart attack Monday in Washington.An anthropologist with an interest in the visual arts, he joined the National Museum of African Art in 1987 and played a major role in selecting and recommending works for the museum to acquire.Adil Carcani,75, prime minister of Albania's last Stalinist government, died in Tirana, Albania, Monday after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 25, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- Jam-packed with soldiers of every description, with relief workers, with camera crews, with reporters from around the globe and with refugees from Kosovo who keep coming and coming, this capital of a nation on the edge of a war is alive with possibility.Austrian army officers flock to the Austrian restaurant; Italian police, pistols on their hips, crowd the Italian restaurant; British army vehicles jostle for room on the rubble-strewn roads with white aid-agency cars; helicopters fly this way and that to the delight of little boys playing on the heaps of abandoned construction sites.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder/Tribune | April 4, 1999
TIRANA, Albania -- Exhausted and working amid the smell of unwashed clothes, vomit and baby diapers, Fitor Mucha, a coordinator with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, has given up counting the Kosovar Albanians streaming daily into this 800-seat gymnasium."
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1996
In one day, Martineta Leka made $200 selling hot dogs from her hot dog stand.But the money was just part of a computer simulation Leka and three other Albanian high school teachers were using at Anne Arundel Community College."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 26, 1993
TIRANA, Albania -- It was a hallelujah yesterday for Europe's poorest nation: Pope John Paul II came in golden robes to celebrate a national resurrection. There can have been few spring days in the past half-century as exalting for a Balkan land so long self-consumed by tyranny, isolation and the systematic persecution of all religion.Improbability reigned for a day in a time-stood-still place whose Communist leaders once proclaimed the world's first officially atheistic nation.The world's most famous Albanian, octogenarian apostle of the poor, Mother Teresa of Calcutta, humbly came in sandals and her trademark blue-and-white habit.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 31, 1992
TIRANA, Albania -- For nearly a half-century, they kept their origins a secret. They hid their birth certificates, their passports and their Social Security cards deep in a drawer somewhere. Now they clamor for recognition at the gates of the new U.S. Embassy.Much to the surprise of U.S. officials, it appears that as many as 400 Americans were trapped inside Albania during the Communists' 45-year-long isolationist reign. Only now, with the opening of a U.S. Embassy in Tirana, are they able to claim their birthright.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 16, 1998
TIRANA, Albania -- With the U.S. Embassy in Albania shut down for fear of a terrorist attack and its dependents and nonessential personnel sent home, a company of Marines flew in yesterday to stand guard over those remaining."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 4, 2006
ROME -- The hijacking of a Turkish airliner by at least one unarmed Turk reported to have a message for Pope Benedict XVI ended peacefully last night, with the passengers free and unharmed and the assailant in custody. The hijacked Boeing 737-400 with 113 people aboard landed on Italy's Adriatic coast, near Brindisi. The plane was en route to Istanbul from the Albanian capital of Tirana when diverted over Greece. Initial reports said two hijackers were protesting the pope's coming visit to Turkey, apparently another violent reaction to recent statements made by the pontiff that cast Islam in a bad light and triggered protests.
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