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By PETER JENSEN | April 10, 1994
Sam Baldwin is fretting over the pitfalls of dating when his needling friend, Jay, utters the fateful word."Tiramisu.""What is tiramisu?" Sam asks."You'll find out.""Well, what is it?""You'll see.""Some woman is going to want me to do it to her and I won't know what it is.""You'll love it.""This is going to be tough. Tough. Much tougher than I thought it would be," concludes an exasperated Sam.WHAT A WIMP.Tough? You want to hear tough? Sam and Jay are mere fiction. The two characters portrayed by actors Tom Hanks and Rob Reiner in "Sleepless In Seattle" are never seen dealing with tiramisu again.
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By Meekah Hopkins | March 19, 2013
I have two things to thank the Inner Harbor's Rusty Scupper for this week. One, they've answered the age-old question (no, but seriously) of "What can you reasonably drink - not shoot - with Rum Chata?" and two, they've created a dessert cocktail I can finally enjoy. If you've never tasted the Italian confection Tiramisu, wine director Julian Demiri's description might be a little lost on you: "It's Tiramisu, in a glass. " But if you have? It should say everything. Tiramisu, which translates to "pick me up," is an Italian dessert made of sponge cake that has been dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of egg yolks and mascarpone cheese, and flavored with Marsala wine and cocoa.
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NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 8, 2006
You'd never guess it from his humble rowhouse bakery, where he fires up the oven each day at 2 a.m. Or from his little stall in Cross Street market, where, after a few hours' sleep, he peddles pastries until after dinnertime. But Carminantonio Iannaccone invented tiramisu. At least he says he did, back in Treviso, Italy, in the late 1960s. No less an expert than David Rosengarten, a food writer and Food Network personality, says it just might be true.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 8, 2006
You'd never guess it from his humble rowhouse bakery, where he fires up the oven each day at 2 a.m. Or from his little stall in Cross Street market, where, after a few hours' sleep, he peddles pastries until after dinnertime. But Carminantonio Iannaccone invented tiramisu. At least he says he did, back in Treviso, Italy, in the late 1960s. No less an expert than David Rosengarten, a food writer and Food Network personality, says it just might be true.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
Carla Brumfield of Darlington requested a low-fat tiramisu. She said she had it several years ago, lost it and "I hope someone out there has it." Catherine Rooker of Baltimore responded. "Here is a recipe I got from Cooking Light magazine several years ago," Rooker wrote. "A friend with a strong Italian background said she loved it. Since I am not a coffee drinker, I have also made this with double-strength orange juice [mix frozen concentrate with half the amount of water] and added a layer of sliced strawberries and toasted sliced almonds.
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By John Lehndorff and John Lehndorff,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 13, 1993
In the romantic comedy "Sleepless in Seattle," a widower played by Tom Hanks asks for advice from his friend, played by Rob Reiner.He hasn't gone on a date since the Carter administration and wants to know what "tiramisu" is. He worries that "some woman is gonna want me to do it to her, and I won't know how to do it."Mr. Reiner neglects to explain tiramisu, which has resulted in a flood of inquiring calls to the film's distributor, TriStar.Although this is a family newspaper, it is appropriate to talk about tiramisu, especially as practiced by caring, consenting adults.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
Tiramisu, which is pronounced tier-eh-me-zuu, has recently gained recognition in "Sleepless in Seattle," a movie comedy in which a widower played by Tom Hanks thinks tiramisu is something sexual, rather than a light, sweet Italian dessert.A recipe was in order. Rita T. Werthamer of Baltimore requested the recipe several weeks ago and Chef Syglowski, who tests the recipes sent in, chose those of Joan Demshock of Timonium and Karen Zorn of Ellicott City.Demshock's tiramisuYields 10 to 12 servings6 egg yolks1 1/4 cups sugar1 1/4 cups mascarpone (a soft creamy)
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By Patsy Jamieson and Patsy Jamieson,Eating Well Magazine | July 6, 1994
Joyce Shue, from Annapolis, recently wrote that while she and her husband loved tiramisu, they could rarely afford the indulgence with the amount of saturated fat in the recipe. She wondered if her recipe for tiramisu could be adapted so they could enjoy this treat more often.With a few adjustments we came up with a creamy alternative with far less fat.Italian for "pick me up," tiramisu is as intriguing as it sounds: a rich dessert of coffee-and-brandy-soaked ladyfingers piled high between layers of mascarpone and cream filling.
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By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | March 5, 1997
Evelyn Tribole, celebrity dietitian and drumbeater for healthy living, is unapologetic: "I do love to eat," says the former "Good Morning America" nutritionist, "and I have a tremendous sweet tooth."But traditional light desserts -- "air food," she calls them -- have never quenched her desire. "It feels like you haven't eaten anything," she says.So the former marathon runner arrived at a compromise: lightening recipes without ruining them.The result is "Healthy Home-style Desserts" (Viking, $24.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | March 6, 1992
Since it opened, Germano's Trattoria Petrucci has consistently been one of Little Italy's best restaurants -- a cozy little spot with attentive waiters where you can get imaginative food as well as the usual spaghetti bolognese and shrimp in marinara sauce. Now owner Germano Fabiani is offering something special: a six-course dinner that will introduceBaltimoreans to some of the classic dishes from his native Tuscany. Whether enough people are going to be willing to give up their shrimp in marinara sauce to make it worthwhile to continue the special dinners is another question.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
Cake Mix Cookies More Than 175 Delectable Cookie Recipes That Begin With a Box of Cake Mix The Twinkies Cookbook An Inventive and Unexpected Recipe Collection From Hostess Ten Speed Press / 2006 / $12.95 Twinkie Sushi? Pigs in a Twinkie? For the 75th anniversary of the Twinkie, Hostess solicited recipes from around the country and got some curious takes on this childhood treat - including a Chicken-Raspberry Twinkie Salad from Gary Gonya of Baltimore. Despite the salad entry, this isn't a book aimed at the health-conscious - Twinkies are deep-fried, sauteed in butter, covered in buttercream frosting and fondant and stuffed with sausage.
SPORTS
January 5, 2006
After a hard day of hiking or paddling, there's nothing like squatting down to a steaming bowl of gruel to make you feel alive. The standard camp staples of mac and cheese, Ramen noodles and organic unborn linoleum were OK when you were young and had your whole life ahead of you. Now that you're older with a refined palate, it's time for a food upgrade. The Backpacker's Pantry line goes beyond Boy Scout fare to something you might even call cuisine: Southwestern Smoked Salmon Pasta, Pad Thai and Louisiana Red Beans and Rice are favorites.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | October 12, 2005
Shoppers need plenty of fuel for a daylong spree in the mammoth Hunt Valley Towne Centre. When planning an outing there, these spots are good starting points for filling an empty stomach. GreystoneGrill 118 Shawan Road, Hunt Valley Towne Centre 410-527-0999 HOURS // 11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Monday- Thursday; 11:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Friday- Saturday; 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday GreystoneGrill's twin surf and turf skewers, $29, quell both meat and seafood cravings. Its cubes of grilled steak, scallops wrapped in browned bacon, shrimp and tangy tomatoes slip off the skewer and barely fit into your mouth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 27, 2005
Oh, what you missed, when Baltimore's "bad boy" filmmaker John Waters sat down for a chat with students at Baltimore School for the Arts! Waters was this year's guest as the Colgate Salsbury Visiting Artist series celebrated its fifth anniversary. And he proved, once again, he is as entertaining as his movies. A sampling of the Waters' wisdom that day: "It helps to be what you make fun of." "Why would you watch reality television when you've got Baltimore?" "Baltimore is a town where everyone thinks they're normal, but they're totally insane.
NEWS
By Tom Waldron and Tom Waldron,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2004
It was slow at the Starlight Diner the other night. Just me and the waitress and the radio. It could have made for a decent country song. But, I was there for the carryout. The Starlight sits between a liquor store and a rent-to-own furniture outlet in a somewhat bedraggled shopping center in the 11900 block of Reisterstown Road, not far from Franklin Boulevard. Inside, the restaurant has some diner-style chrome, booths and several framed covers of Life magazines from the 1960s. ("Two Californians at home in a cave in Crete," read one intriguing 1968 headline.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2003
Carla Brumfield of Darlington requested a low-fat tiramisu. She said she had it several years ago, lost it and "I hope someone out there has it." Catherine Rooker of Baltimore responded. "Here is a recipe I got from Cooking Light magazine several years ago," Rooker wrote. "A friend with a strong Italian background said she loved it. Since I am not a coffee drinker, I have also made this with double-strength orange juice [mix frozen concentrate with half the amount of water] and added a layer of sliced strawberries and toasted sliced almonds.
SPORTS
January 5, 2006
After a hard day of hiking or paddling, there's nothing like squatting down to a steaming bowl of gruel to make you feel alive. The standard camp staples of mac and cheese, Ramen noodles and organic unborn linoleum were OK when you were young and had your whole life ahead of you. Now that you're older with a refined palate, it's time for a food upgrade. The Backpacker's Pantry line goes beyond Boy Scout fare to something you might even call cuisine: Southwestern Smoked Salmon Pasta, Pad Thai and Louisiana Red Beans and Rice are favorites.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 5, 1995
How do some restaurants manage not only to survive but flourish in what are hard times for an already risky business? Just when I think only chain restaurants will make it into the 21st century, I eat at a place like Boccaccio. You can easily spend $50 a person here, but it's packed on a Wednesday night. Which leads me to some rules for fledgling restaurateurs:Rule No. 1: Location, location and, yes, location. Little Italy is still synonymous with a festive evening. People feel safer here than just about anywhere downtown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and Robin Tunnicliff Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 8, 2002
David Chu's China Bistro looks like a typical Chinese restaurant. The waiters are Asian. The menu lists all the usual suspects: egg foo young, a pu pu platter, kung pao chicken and Peking duck. Chopsticks and steaming pots of tea deck the tables. But look again. A bearded man in a yarmulke walks in and out of the kitchen. There's a small sink in the foyer between the restrooms. No shellfish or pork is on the menu. And on a recent night, all beef dishes had to be off the tables before sundown.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | March 5, 1997
Evelyn Tribole, celebrity dietitian and drumbeater for healthy living, is unapologetic: "I do love to eat," says the former "Good Morning America" nutritionist, "and I have a tremendous sweet tooth."But traditional light desserts -- "air food," she calls them -- have never quenched her desire. "It feels like you haven't eaten anything," she says.So the former marathon runner arrived at a compromise: lightening recipes without ruining them.The result is "Healthy Home-style Desserts" (Viking, $24.95)
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