Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTipton Airport
IN THE NEWS

Tipton Airport

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
Pilots such as Eric Flamino love to jump into their small planes and fly, to the Eastern Shore, to locales along the Eastern Seaboard. They go for weekend jaunts or a bite to eat before coming back to where they started, Tipton Airport. Flamino, who lives in Piney Orchard, recently flew to Rehoboth Beach, Del., to catch up with a friend over breakfast. "It's a great way to keep in touch," said Flamino, president of the Tipton Airport Pilots' Association. "And you get to see a beautiful sunny morning crossing over the bay."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | July 8, 2007
Tipton Airport officials are wooing business executives with a proposal to allow corporate jets to take off and land at the former military airfield just south of Fort Meade. Board members overseeing the Anne Arundel County-owned airport have held informal meetings with state and federal aviation officials this year, and conceptual drawings to expand the 3,000-foot runway to accommodate jets were received favorably, said Eric Flamino, chairman of the Tipton Airport Authority. While the project is years off, airport officials are seeking to capitalize on the boom at Fort Meade, which will add tens of thousands of jobs over the next seven years, as well as Central Maryland's commercial growth, particularly in the high-tech sector.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
Anne Arundel and Howard counties have backed away from joining in a bicounty authority to run Tipton Airport, and for now it will be a project of Anne Arundel.However, officials from both counties said they still are working together, and Howard County could get back into the act when legislation is submitted to the General Assembly this session.Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker and Howard representatives on the Tipton Advisory Committee, which is overseeing plans to turn the dormant military airfield at Fort Meade into a general aviation airport, lobbied in December to be included in draft legislation.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,sun reporter | May 5, 2007
A single-engine airplane crashed while trying to land at Fort Meade's Tipton Airport in Anne Arundel County yesterday, seriously injuring the pilot, authorities said. The two-seater plane came down on Old Portland Road near Route 198 in Laurel about 4:15 p.m. and skidded into a wooded area a half-mile from the runway, authorities said. The pilot, Robert R. James Jr., 60, of Emmaus, Pa., was trapped inside the cockpit when firefighters arrived. It took about 15 minutes to free him, said Sgt. Arthur Betts of the Maryland State Police.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | December 27, 1998
Anne Arundel County could get a delayed holiday gift next month if plans to expand a lease for Tipton Airport go through as scheduled.Army officials are working on an addendum to the lease it signed with the county this year that would let the county start using most of the airfield, including the runway and taxiways.Tipton Airport is an Army airfield that closed in September 1995 because of military budget cuts. The county wants to convert it into a general aviation airport and has spent $300,000 in the past three years on an airport manager, consultants and other costs to open it.The county now has use of only a small parcel there that includes three hangars.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2001
It's commonly called the "many-headed rush," but that's not the feeling Tipton Airport officials got when they learned that the discovery of the single knee-high plant would bring their construction plans to a halt. The find had wide repercussions because until this one was spotted growing in a ditch about four months ago, no one knew the plant still existed in Maryland. Environmental officials say Juncus polycephalus, which is laden with spiky thistles and is found in nontidal wetlands throughout North America, was thought to have disappeared from the state decades ago. "This is the only known occurrence of it in Maryland," said Glen Therres, coordinator of the Natural Heritage program for the state Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1997
Howard County will not be included -- for now -- in legislation to create an authority that would run Tipton Airport.The bill will name only Anne Arundel County.However, officials from both counties said they still are working together, and Howard County could get back into the act after legislation is submitted to the General Assembly this session.Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker and Howard representatives on the Tipton Advisory Committee, which is overseeing plans to turn the dormant military airfield at Fort Meade into a general aviation airport, lobbied Anne Arundel County in December to be included in draft legislation.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,sun reporter | July 8, 2007
Tipton Airport officials are wooing business executives with a proposal to allow corporate jets to take off and land at the former military airfield just south of Fort Meade. Board members overseeing the Anne Arundel County-owned airport have held informal meetings with state and federal aviation officials this year, and conceptual drawings to expand the 3,000-foot runway to accommodate jets were received favorably, said Eric Flamino, chairman of the Tipton Airport Authority. While the project is years off, airport officials are seeking to capitalize on the boom at Fort Meade, which will add tens of thousands of jobs over the next seven years, as well as Central Maryland's commercial growth, particularly in the high-tech sector.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2002
Two months after the Federal Aviation Administration lifted all flying restrictions at Tipton Airport, those operating the former Army airfield are not looking back. They say they're getting past losses incurred during the month when the federal government closed airports near Washington after the attacks Sept. 11 and the two subsequent months when flights were severely restricted. "In our case, we kind of made the decision to bite the bullet, if you will, and move on," said Tipton spokesman David Almy.
NEWS
By Robert F. Patrick and Robert F. Patrick,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2000
Dennis C. McCoy, a lobbyist and former legislator who has been a pilot for more than a decade, has been named chairman of the Tipton Airport Authority by County Executive Janet S. Owens. "Dennis is eminently qualified to lead the authority, and I'm delighted that he's agreed to do this for Anne Arundel County," Owens said in announcing the 3 appointment last week. McCoy said he hopes to double within a year the number of planes using the airport on the southwestern edge of Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | November 2, 2006
The pilot of a single-engine plane that crashed at Tipton Airport, killing him and his passenger, failed to get flight clearance before takeoff, according to a preliminary investigation report. An employee of the airport in western Anne Arundel County told the pilot, Daniel L. Eberhardt, 57, of Downers Grove, Ill., after he filed his flight plan Oct. 19 that he needed a special code before heading into restricted airspace on his trip home, the National Transportation Safety Board said in the report released this week.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTER | October 24, 2006
The pilot of a small plane that crashed in Anne Arundel County on Thursday shortly after takeoff had been ordered moments earlier to return to Tipton Airport because he was flying in restricted air space without clearance, according to a recording of conversations between him and air traffic controllers. "You are violating the ADIZ [Air Defense Identification Zone]," an unidentified air traffic controller tells the pilot. "You need to land at Tipton immediately, and I'll have them get you a number for air defense."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2005
The Carroll County Regional Airport, which is on the verge of a $60 million expansion, has been chosen as the 2005 Airport of the Year by the Maryland Aviation Administration. The award, which recognizes excellence in operations and service, comes as county officials are considering a proposal that would double the airport's capacity, opening the facility to more and larger aircraft and generating jobs in the region. "Of the 35 airports under MAA's jurisdiction, ours was selected for this award," said Gary Horst, who supervises the airport as administrator of the county's Office of Performance Auditing and Special Projects.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
Pilots such as Eric Flamino love to jump into their small planes and fly, to the Eastern Shore, to locales along the Eastern Seaboard. They go for weekend jaunts or a bite to eat before coming back to where they started, Tipton Airport. Flamino, who lives in Piney Orchard, recently flew to Rehoboth Beach, Del., to catch up with a friend over breakfast. "It's a great way to keep in touch," said Flamino, president of the Tipton Airport Pilots' Association. "And you get to see a beautiful sunny morning crossing over the bay."
NEWS
April 21, 2002
Tipton Airport to receive grants to finance repairs Tipton Airport will receive nearly $900,000 in grants from the Federal Aviation Administration to finance improvements at the Anne Arundel County airport, officials announced. Tipton will use the $889,000 to rehabilitate Building 90, a former Army helicopter hangar that has been vacant for 10 years. Tipton Airport Authority had applied for the funds, but did not know it received them until Maryland Sens. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski and Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin made their announcement Friday.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2002
First, a rare plant got in Tipton Airport's way. Then, a floodplain blocked its plans. Now, the airport's engineers say they have found a way to build long-sought, garage-like hangars on the former Army airfield. The site should look familiar to pilots watching the T-hangar developments. It's the same field that airport board members first flagged as ideal for the hangars more than two years ago - the one they were ready to write off because of the endangered, spiky-thistled plant sprouting from a ditch in the middle of it. The new plan is to split the field, saving part as a sanctuary for the plant while building on the rest.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1999
With a few strokes of the pen and the roar of an airplane engine, it was "wheels up" and a long-awaited liftoff for Tipton Airport yesterday.After nearly a decade of delay from the cleanup of explosives and other hazardous materials, Anne Arundel County officially took control of Fort Meade's airport, which lies in the heart of the bustling Baltimore-Washington corridor.Amid the day's ceremonies, politicians and business leaders praised the 346-acre airport's potential to spark economic growth in the region, like the slightly larger Frederick Municipal Airport, which generates $60 million annually.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2002
First, a rare plant got in Tipton Airport's way. Then, a floodplain blocked its plans. Now, the airport's engineers say they have found a way to build long-sought, garage-like hangars on the former Army airfield. The site should look familiar to pilots watching the T-hangar developments. It's the same field that airport board members first flagged as ideal for the hangars more than two years ago - the one they were ready to write off because of the endangered, spiky-thistled plant sprouting from a ditch in the middle of it. The new plan is to split the field, saving part as a sanctuary for the plant while building on the rest.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.