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Tiny Tim

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By Andrew Ratner | December 4, 1996
MY FIRST NIGHT'S work for a newspaper, I was sent to interview Tiny Tim.He was the headliner for a Police Benevolent Association fund-raiser. I sat for about 15 minutes with him on folding chairs backstage at a high school auditorium in eastern Pennsylvania.It was not the saddest 15 minutes I've spent in journalism, though it may have been the most pitiful."Sixty-eight," he sighed, repeating like some mantra that year I had just asked him about. "Sometimes, I still think it's 1968. It's so strange.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 29, 2012
One thing that Ebenezer Scrooge does not get is a good night's sleep. That's because pesky ghosts keep appearing with reminders that he needs to reconsider his grumpy life. Ever since Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol" in 1843, audiences have enjoyed accompanying Scrooge on his overnight ethical transformation. You have yet another opportunity to ride along in the musical theater version of "A Christmas Carol" that's being festively staged at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia.
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FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | September 13, 1992
Each summer during the flood of incoming tulip catalogs, I think of Tiny Tim.He turned me on to tulips 25 years ago.Remember Tiny Tim, the singer? Stringy black hair and a beak. Played the ukulele. Falsetto voice like a frightened canary. Sang "Tiptoe Through the Tulips."That tune was such a hit that I went out and bought my first bag of tulip bulbs and stuck them in the front yard. To heck with soil requirements. Tiny Tim's music made tulips fun to grow.Despite my ignorance, the bulbs survived.
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
Editor: Christmas comes but once a year and the reflections of this year have not been a pretty one for many of us. Like Ebenezer Scrooge, it has been easy to be self-absorbed in our daily survival as our world swirls around us. Like Bob Cratchit, we are equally concerned about keeping our position as we are about our family's future if that position is lost. Scrooge's business was lending money to others by taking ownership of their desires, even though many of his clients could not afford Scrooge's financial entanglements.
EXPLORE
December 22, 2011
Editor: Christmas comes but once a year and the reflections of this year have not been a pretty one for many of us. Like Ebenezer Scrooge, it has been easy to be self-absorbed in our daily survival as our world swirls around us. Like Bob Cratchit, we are equally concerned about keeping our position as we are about our family's future if that position is lost. Scrooge's business was lending money to others by taking ownership of their desires, even though many of his clients could not afford Scrooge's financial entanglements.
NEWS
December 25, 2009
Christmas comes but once a year, and the reflections of 2009 have not been pretty for many of us. Like Ebenezer Scrooge, it has been easy to be self-absorbed in our daily survival as our world swirls around us. Like Bob Cratchit, we are equally concerned about keeping our positions as we are about our families' future if those positions are lost. Scrooge's business was lending money to others by taking ownership of their desires, even though many of his clients could not afford Scrooge's financial entanglements, a case not far removed from the folly of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's spending binge that put us all in debt for decades to come.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2006
Young actors dressed in 19th-century garb marched to the stage, singing traditional carols. Beggars and bankers, peasants and nobles all mixed in a crowd. Several of the characters were familiar, present in multiple incarnations: Tiny Tim Cratchet as the child with a crutch, and as a mischievous young man; Ebenezer Scrooge as a youth and as an elderly man. It's the opening scene of Remembering Uncle Scrooge, a two-act musical that debuts this week in downtown Bel Air. The actors, in character and costume, hope to mingle with the audience at the dinner theater, the first event in the refurbished Lt. Gen. Milton A. Reckord Armory on North Main Street.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | September 3, 1993
At the risk of whipping the reader into a jealous rage, this is about a recent visit to the Maryland State Fair where I saw -- here's the good part -- Tiny Tim, billed as the "World's Smallest Horse!"Oh, he was something to see, all right, a tiny palomino that stood just . . . well, there was one problem.The problem was that after paying your buck to see him, you found out that instead of being 10 inches tall as advertised, the stupid horse was about three feet tall -- only he was standing in a pit to make him look shorter.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2004
The familiar story of Scrooge, Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim, mixed with clowning, tumbling, juggling, dancing, singing, even a little magic -- that's A Christmas Carol as performed at Howard Community College. This variation on Charles Dickens' novel was created many years ago for a theater in Los Angeles. The adapter, Doris Baizley, conceived the idea of presenting a Victorian English story in a Renaissance Italian style. Commedia dell'arte troupes were popular in Italy in the 16th century and later.
NEWS
December 25, 2009
A 2009 'Christmas Carol' Christmas comes but once a year, and the reflections of 2009 have not been pretty for many of us. Like Ebenezer Scrooge, it has been easy to be self-absorbed in our daily survival as our world swirls around us. Like Bob Cratchit, we are equally concerned about keeping our positions as we are about our families' future if those positions are lost. Scrooge's business was lending money to others by taking ownership of their desires, even though many of his clients could not afford Scrooge's financial entanglements, a case not far removed from the folly of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's spending binge that put us all in debt for decades to come.
NEWS
December 25, 2009
A 2009 'Christmas Carol' Christmas comes but once a year, and the reflections of 2009 have not been pretty for many of us. Like Ebenezer Scrooge, it has been easy to be self-absorbed in our daily survival as our world swirls around us. Like Bob Cratchit, we are equally concerned about keeping our positions as we are about our families' future if those positions are lost. Scrooge's business was lending money to others by taking ownership of their desires, even though many of his clients could not afford Scrooge's financial entanglements, a case not far removed from the folly of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's spending binge that put us all in debt for decades to come.
NEWS
December 25, 2009
Christmas comes but once a year, and the reflections of 2009 have not been pretty for many of us. Like Ebenezer Scrooge, it has been easy to be self-absorbed in our daily survival as our world swirls around us. Like Bob Cratchit, we are equally concerned about keeping our positions as we are about our families' future if those positions are lost. Scrooge's business was lending money to others by taking ownership of their desires, even though many of his clients could not afford Scrooge's financial entanglements, a case not far removed from the folly of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's spending binge that put us all in debt for decades to come.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 4, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With his long-promised veto yesterday of a bill to expand health insurance for children, President Bush has ignited an ideological battle that could rage on into next year's presidential campaign. At bottom, the issue is whether government should take the lead in extending health care benefits to uninsured children - mostly in low-income, but some in middle-class families - or whether the problem should be left primarily to the private sector. The State Children's Health Insurance Program, known as SCHIP, is managed by states within federal guidelines.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | December 10, 2006
Young actors dressed in 19th-century garb marched to the stage, singing traditional carols. Beggars and bankers, peasants and nobles all mixed in a crowd. Several of the characters were familiar, present in multiple incarnations: Tiny Tim Cratchet as the child with a crutch, and as a mischievous young man; Ebenezer Scrooge as a youth and as an elderly man. It's the opening scene of Remembering Uncle Scrooge, a two-act musical that debuts this week in downtown Bel Air. The actors, in character and costume, hope to mingle with the audience at the dinner theater, the first event in the refurbished Lt. Gen. Milton A. Reckord Armory on North Main Street.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | December 7, 2006
And so Mr. Scrooge kept Christmas in his heart and made his clerk Bob Cratchit a partner and found an orthopedic surgeon who fixed Tiny Tim's gimpy leg. Scrooge was a friend and benefactor to all, and he also got his hair and eyebrows trimmed and bought a new suit, a blue pinstripe. People called him Ben. When he died, the entire city mourned. The firm of Scrooge & Cratchit became ScratchitInc, and it got out of the counting house business and into condominiums. Old blacking factories and woolen mills and foundries were converted to luxury apartments with wood-burning fireplaces, eat-in kitchens with marble countertops, and hot tubs on the balconies.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 2004
The familiar story of Scrooge, Bob Cratchit and Tiny Tim, mixed with clowning, tumbling, juggling, dancing, singing, even a little magic -- that's A Christmas Carol as performed at Howard Community College. This variation on Charles Dickens' novel was created many years ago for a theater in Los Angeles. The adapter, Doris Baizley, conceived the idea of presenting a Victorian English story in a Renaissance Italian style. Commedia dell'arte troupes were popular in Italy in the 16th century and later.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2004
It is the time of year for A Christmas Carol, with its holiday message, stingy Ebenezer Scrooge, hopeful Tiny Tim and acrobatic clowns. Yes, clowns. The adaptation by Doris Baizley being performed by Howard Community College's Student Alumni Arts also has pantomime, somersaults, cast members speaking to the audience, masks and several musical numbers on hand bells. "It's the same characters; you just have a little bit different spins on everything," said Jenny Male, an HCC drama teacher and director of the show.
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