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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
Spock's ears always got the press. Many scoffed at those Vulcan ears -- save the occasional space babe who was very interested in Spock's ears. But that's another story.This story is about James T. Kirk's ears. Ears that have made Kirk -- still going by the name William Shatner -- a patient at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Who knew? Then, Kirk has this doctor's appointment in Baltimore on FridayMr. Shatner is one of 40 million Americans who suffer from tinnitus, a disorder that causes a constant ringing or buzzing sound in the ears.
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By Martha Quillin, The (Raleigh, N.C.) News and Observer | January 12, 2013
On his two deployments to Iraq with the 18th Airborne Corps, Spc. Jon Michael Cripps spent more time keeping the Army's computers running than he did in combat, but he can't forget what he heard. The constant roar of generators, along with the hum of computer servers and the high-powered air conditioners required to cool them, damaged Cripps' hearing and left an intermittent ringing in his ears. "You think about maybe getting wounded in battle, getting those kinds of scars," Cripps said after his annual hearing test at a health center on post recently.
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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | January 19, 1993
Q: I have a constant ringing in my ears. It is particularl annoying at night when I am trying to get to sleep. What causes this and can anything be done to make it go away?A: The medical term for the ringing noise heard by you, but not by others, is tinnitus. It can also have a buzzing, roaring, whistling or hissing quality.Although tinnitus may be caused by something as simple as a plug of wax in the ear, more often it is a symptom of a more serious problem in the middle ear, such as a hole in the eardrum, stiffening of the middle ear bones (otosclerosis)
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | June 21, 2007
The sign at the airport said "THREAT LEVEL ORANGE," but I ignored it and went into the terminal where nobody unknown to me asked me to carry anything aboard the plane and I saw nothing suspicious to report to authorities. The truly suspicious people these days are the authorities. When I got to Chicago, however, there was a high-pitched chittering sound in the air reminiscent of the soundtrack of a sci-fi movie in which an intergalactic virus lands on Earth in gooey pods in the treetops that will hatch into carnivorous bats.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUNKING FEATURES SYNDICATE | April 22, 1997
I suffer from ringing in the ears. Some nights the hissing and buzzing is so bad I can't fall asleep. Are there any drugs that can take away the noise and help me fall asleep?There are no cures for tinnitus (ringing in the ears). A masking device that provides sound such as rain may help. Some doctors prescribe drugs like Xanax (alprazolam). Prolonged use may lead to dependence, however.Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Dr. Teresa Graedon is a medical anthropologist and nutrition expert.Pub Date: 4/22/97
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | September 10, 2000
Q. In the past few months I have become acutely aware of a ringing in my ears. The doctor says it is tinnitus and there is nothing that can be done to eliminate it. Is it possible that there is a vitamin or herb I can take that would alleviate the problem? You have no idea how disconcerting this noise is. A. There is no cure for ringing in the ears. Some doctors prescribe anti-anxiety agents like Xanax, while others suggest white noise (like static) to mask the sound. We have heard from some readers that ginkgo might be beneficial.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 4, 2000
Q. I have long suffered from severely dry, chapped hands, especially after working in dirt, washing dishes or handling certain vegetables. My hands would not only be very dry and bleed, but would also develop tiny blisters that would spread. My dermatologist prescribed Lotrisone, and I used it for several years. This ointment had to be applied to the affected area often, however, so my prescription lasted only a couple of weeks. And it is expensive. I finally found a lotion containing oatmeal (Aveeno)
NEWS
By Martha Quillin, The (Raleigh, N.C.) News and Observer | January 12, 2013
On his two deployments to Iraq with the 18th Airborne Corps, Spc. Jon Michael Cripps spent more time keeping the Army's computers running than he did in combat, but he can't forget what he heard. The constant roar of generators, along with the hum of computer servers and the high-powered air conditioners required to cool them, damaged Cripps' hearing and left an intermittent ringing in his ears. "You think about maybe getting wounded in battle, getting those kinds of scars," Cripps said after his annual hearing test at a health center on post recently.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,Hartford Courant | February 22, 2004
No question, baby boomers still love that old-time rock 'n' roll. But years of exposure to loud concerts, cranked-up stereos, blaring headphones and other environmental noises could be leading to an old age filled with silence, experts say. Unlike their parents and grandparents, who typically developed age-related hearing loss in their 60s, baby boomers are experiencing the condition in their 40s and 50s, according to the National Council on Aging....
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | June 21, 2007
The sign at the airport said "THREAT LEVEL ORANGE," but I ignored it and went into the terminal where nobody unknown to me asked me to carry anything aboard the plane and I saw nothing suspicious to report to authorities. The truly suspicious people these days are the authorities. When I got to Chicago, however, there was a high-pitched chittering sound in the air reminiscent of the soundtrack of a sci-fi movie in which an intergalactic virus lands on Earth in gooey pods in the treetops that will hatch into carnivorous bats.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 31, 2005
I have just developed a hissing sound in my ears. The onset was very rapid. The doctor diagnosed it as tinnitus, but would give me no reason for the problem. He said there wasn't anything I could do. I've noticed that some days it is less disturbing than others, but some nights it awakens me because it has become so loud. I was drinking large quantities of tonic water, which contains quinine, when this started. Do you have any suggestions to help me? Stop the tonic water! Quinine gives tonic its distinctive bitter flavor, but it can cause tinnitus, especially at high doses.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,Hartford Courant | February 22, 2004
No question, baby boomers still love that old-time rock 'n' roll. But years of exposure to loud concerts, cranked-up stereos, blaring headphones and other environmental noises could be leading to an old age filled with silence, experts say. Unlike their parents and grandparents, who typically developed age-related hearing loss in their 60s, baby boomers are experiencing the condition in their 40s and 50s, according to the National Council on Aging....
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | September 10, 2000
Q. In the past few months I have become acutely aware of a ringing in my ears. The doctor says it is tinnitus and there is nothing that can be done to eliminate it. Is it possible that there is a vitamin or herb I can take that would alleviate the problem? You have no idea how disconcerting this noise is. A. There is no cure for ringing in the ears. Some doctors prescribe anti-anxiety agents like Xanax, while others suggest white noise (like static) to mask the sound. We have heard from some readers that ginkgo might be beneficial.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon, and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 4, 2000
Q. I have long suffered from severely dry, chapped hands, especially after working in dirt, washing dishes or handling certain vegetables. My hands would not only be very dry and bleed, but would also develop tiny blisters that would spread. My dermatologist prescribed Lotrisone, and I used it for several years. This ointment had to be applied to the affected area often, however, so my prescription lasted only a couple of weeks. And it is expensive. I finally found a lotion containing oatmeal (Aveeno)
FEATURES
By Jennifer Steinhauer and Jennifer Steinhauer,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE Sun staff writer Carl Schoettler contributed to this article | December 30, 1997
Celebrities have long endorsed sodas, breakfast cereal and clothes, so is it surprising that they are weighing in on angioplasty?Increasingly, celebrities are lending their names to hospitals and medical programs, often as an expression of gratitude for helping them through a personal medical crisis.Present and past Orioles Eric Davis and Boog Powell have urged self-testing for colon cancer in a promotional campaign sponsored by the University of Maryland Medical Center, WJZ-TV Channel 13 and Giant Pharmacies.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUNKING FEATURES SYNDICATE | April 22, 1997
I suffer from ringing in the ears. Some nights the hissing and buzzing is so bad I can't fall asleep. Are there any drugs that can take away the noise and help me fall asleep?There are no cures for tinnitus (ringing in the ears). A masking device that provides sound such as rain may help. Some doctors prescribe drugs like Xanax (alprazolam). Prolonged use may lead to dependence, however.Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Dr. Teresa Graedon is a medical anthropologist and nutrition expert.Pub Date: 4/22/97
FEATURES
By Jennifer Steinhauer and Jennifer Steinhauer,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE Sun staff writer Carl Schoettler contributed to this article | December 30, 1997
Celebrities have long endorsed sodas, breakfast cereal and clothes, so is it surprising that they are weighing in on angioplasty?Increasingly, celebrities are lending their names to hospitals and medical programs, often as an expression of gratitude for helping them through a personal medical crisis.Present and past Orioles Eric Davis and Boog Powell have urged self-testing for colon cancer in a promotional campaign sponsored by the University of Maryland Medical Center, WJZ-TV Channel 13 and Giant Pharmacies.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 31, 2005
I have just developed a hissing sound in my ears. The onset was very rapid. The doctor diagnosed it as tinnitus, but would give me no reason for the problem. He said there wasn't anything I could do. I've noticed that some days it is less disturbing than others, but some nights it awakens me because it has become so loud. I was drinking large quantities of tonic water, which contains quinine, when this started. Do you have any suggestions to help me? Stop the tonic water! Quinine gives tonic its distinctive bitter flavor, but it can cause tinnitus, especially at high doses.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 1997
Spock's ears always got the press. Many scoffed at those Vulcan ears -- save the occasional space babe who was very interested in Spock's ears. But that's another story.This story is about James T. Kirk's ears. Ears that have made Kirk -- still going by the name William Shatner -- a patient at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Who knew? Then, Kirk has this doctor's appointment in Baltimore on FridayMr. Shatner is one of 40 million Americans who suffer from tinnitus, a disorder that causes a constant ringing or buzzing sound in the ears.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | January 19, 1993
Q: I have a constant ringing in my ears. It is particularl annoying at night when I am trying to get to sleep. What causes this and can anything be done to make it go away?A: The medical term for the ringing noise heard by you, but not by others, is tinnitus. It can also have a buzzing, roaring, whistling or hissing quality.Although tinnitus may be caused by something as simple as a plug of wax in the ear, more often it is a symptom of a more serious problem in the middle ear, such as a hole in the eardrum, stiffening of the middle ear bones (otosclerosis)
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