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NEWS
March 30, 1995
One problem with welfare reform is the tone of the debate. "Do as I say, not as I do," shout the politicians and angry voters -- plenty of whom are no longer married to the mothers or fathers of their own children and who seem as lacking in family values as some of the welfare mothers they preach to. Real welfare reform will come only when this country acknowledges the obvious: There will always be families who need a safety net. "Curing" the joblessness and...
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 3, 2014
A couple of years ago, the governor of Maryland stood on a dock on South River, a bushel of steamed crabs at his feet, telling everyone it was OK to eat Chesapeake blue crabs again - sort of like the mayor in "Jaws" telling everyone it was OK to go back in the water. "I am glad to report that the population of the blue crab is now at a 19-year high," the governor said in April 2012. There was so much excitement about the comeback of the blue crab that the state launched a "True Blue" marketing campaign, identifying and promoting restaurants and markets selling Chesapeake lump.
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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 28, 1998
THERE ARE SEVERAL ways to describe a dish that doesn't quite measure up to your expectations.One is to call it "a work in progress." Another is to say it needs "fine-tuning" or that "some tinkering is required."All these euphemisms were trotted out the other night as my wife and I analyzed the dish of roasted cod topped with a sun-dried tomato tapenade that we had cooked for dinner. It was pretty good. But we were expecting it to be better. The fish was fine, but the tapenade tasted slightly off. Too peppery, a bit acidic.
NEWS
By Jill Zarend-Kubatko, For The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2013
Remember those kids from elementary school who were perpetually building thingamajigs with Legos or erector sets? They grew up to be tinkerers and inventors. Unfortunately, some of them discovered it's not exactly practical to keep a small car in the living room, a robot in the kitchen or a bandsaw in the bedroom. So many of them have turned to hackerspaces — like mega basement workshops but with camaraderie and tons of high-tech equipment. Baltimore Hackerspace, a nonprofit in the industrial part of East Baltimore, allows its members an unconventional way of learning, sharing and inventing.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | February 7, 2000
THIS IS MY personal computer story, but -- wait! -- before you leave me for the obituary page, please understand that I am no geek and the geek factor in this column is about minus-zero. If you think personal computers are grand but understand virtually nothing about them, if you can't tell RAM from ROM and don't really want to, if you admire Bill Gates -- and don't really want to -- stay a while and listen to my computer story. Until a few weeks ago, I didn't have a computer story. I didn't really want one. Worked to avoid one. It's not that I'm fighting a troglodyte battle against computers.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2001
In the third annual Kinetic Sculpture Race that wobbled its way through downtown Baltimore yesterday, not winning was everything. Good costumes mattered. Tinkering genius counted. But finishing first? Oh, the horror. The rules - and the word is used loosely in this oddball competition among pedal-powered contraptions decorated with everything from blow-up dolls to totem masks - rewarded whoever finished in the middle of the pack. So it shouldn't have mattered that Team Fifi, four women piloting a 14-foot-tall pink tulle poodle, zipped effortlessly through South Baltimore as more modest entries struggled to stay upright.
NEWS
December 13, 1993
POLICE LOG* Town Center: 10300 block of Little Patuxent Parkway: A would-be thief tried to steal a 1992 Acura Legend by tinkering with the lock Monday, police said.
NEWS
July 18, 2003
George J. Vakoutis, the retired owner of a truck rental business, died of cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Parkville resident was 84. Born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, Mr. Vakoutis dropped out of city public schools to help run his family's restaurant. At age 16, he began working on oil and coal barges in the Baltimore harbor. He enlisted in the Army in 1939 and worked in the motor pool. After World War II, he continued working on barges and tugs, then became a driver for Branch Motor Freight and, later, Wooleyhan Trucking.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | January 18, 1994
Paris.--Traveling through Europe to talk about bombs and boundaries, President Clinton must have wondered why anyone in these parts wants to be a politician.Not only are European leaders on the front line of multinationalist explosions, but most of the continent seems doomed to continuing economic decline linked to multinational commerce and industry.Mr. Clinton, the American politician, never had it so good, he read in last Thursday's International Herald Tribune. ''As encouraging evidence of an American economic recovery crowds in almost daily,'' reported Erik Ipsen in the Trib's lead story, ''much of the rest of the industrial world looks impatiently for hopeful signs on home soil.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 4, 1993
SARASOTA, Fla. -- The pitcher has more pitches than the catcher has fingers: two kinds of fastballs, two kinds of curveballs, a slider, a changeup. He has control of each. Knows not to throw the one that isn't working. Doesn't frighten on the mound. Doesn't dwell on his success.What's wrong with this picture? The pitcher is 24 years old."It's an age where you should be tinkering, still learning that extra pitch, still trying to nail down what you need to get over the hump in this game," Orioles pitching coach Dick Bosman said.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Coach Randy Edsall had said during training camp that he wanted to combine the “five best guys” on the offensive line, regardless of how they may have ranked on the depth chart entering training camp. Maryland's starters on the line demonstrate that, indeed, Edsall wasn't afraid to shake things up. When the new depth chart was released today -- five days before the season opener against Florida International -- redshirt freshman Michael Dunn and redshirt sophomore Ryan Doyle had moved into starter's spots at guard and tackle, respectively.
FEATURES
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
For their May nuptials, Mount Vernon residents Katie Joost and Nick Garber made careful preparations. They booked a gazebo at Owings Mills' Irvine Nature Center, accessible by a quarter-mile hike. They selected readings that had special meaning to them, including one from "Buffy the Vampire Slayer. " And they prevailed on Katie's uncle, Peter Joost, to officiate - prompting him to become ordained online through the Universal Life Church. "It was really great to be able to create a ceremony that really represented us as a couple," said Katie.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
COLLEGE PARK - The busiest person at Comcast Center on Wednesday night may have been the public-address announcer, who spent the evening announcing wave after wave of Maryland substitutions - sometimes five players at a time. The competitive portion of the night ended quickly as Maryland, which gave three freshmen their first starts, bolted to a big lead and overwhelmed winless Maryland Eastern Shore with its size and passing , 100-68. It was the seventh straight win for the Terps (7-1)
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | April 18, 2012
After hovering over the 50 percent mark on faceoffs for much of the season, Mount St. Mary's has fared worse against Northeast Conference opponents. The team won just 10-of-24 draws against Quinnipiac, 11-of-30 against No. 20 Bryant and 13-of-33 against Robert Morris. The Mountaineers collected six more groundballs than the Bobcats did, but they finished with a -23 margin against the Bears and a -12 differential against the Colonials. In Saturday's 17-14 loss to Robert Morris, coach Tom Gravante resorted to unusual measures by moving starting attackmen like Andrew Scalley and Brett Schmidt and starting midfielder Bryant Schmidt to the wings on faceoffs.
NEWS
By Bill Adams | March 12, 2012
Maryland's General Assembly faces another year of "difficult choices" as it takes up the governor's budget. So it's surprising to me that lawmakers don't turn more readily to what should be an easy choice: closing loopholes in the corporate income tax (CIT). Federal and state governments have faced declining corporate tax revenue for years, mainly thanks to increasingly aggressive use of legal tax avoidance techniques. At the state level, this generally means shifting income from higher- to lower-taxed jurisdictions.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 6, 2012
I was always a big fan of the John le Carre novels, so I'm happy to see the strong reviews for the adaptation of "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy. " The Cold War seems very distant these days, and his novels, which eschewed shoot-em-up theatrics for a more subtle, almost bureaucratic, espionage, might seem quaint today. Here are excerpts from some reviews: Los Angeles Times: [Director Tomas] Alfredson, for his part, has seen to it that "Tinker Tailor" moves along at a fast-paced, almost electrifying clip.
NEWS
By George F. Will | February 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The infantile spectacle that the State of the Union address has become should carry a surgeon general's warning: ''This is harmful to the reputations of the president and the congressional audience, and can cause a spike of cynicism in the watching minority -- thank goodness it is that -- of the citizenry.''In the name of a report on the country's condition, a president notoriously unparsimonious with words delivers a laundry list of everything he can think of that government might do to nudge that condition toward perfection.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 25, 2001
Kate and Leopold has been considerably tinkered with over the past couple of weeks. Here's betting they haven't tinkered enough. Truth in advertising time: Although I first saw this movie nearly a month ago, I have not seen the version being released in theaters today. Neither has any other critic in America: Last week, frantic word went out from Miramax that two scenes and one minor plot thread were being removed from the film. The final version would not be ready for any previews. Judging by what the studio said in its press release, there's good news and bad news about the cuts.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
In regard to the Sun article "School board strife" of October 2 and your editorial of September 29 supporting Howard County School Board elections by district ("Howard's school choice"), you missed the motive behind that proposal byCounty ExecutiveKen Ulman. Mr. Ulman has said that his reason for proposing district elections was for the sake of "diversity" - ethnic and geographic. However, the board and Mr. Ulman do not like the "diversity" of opinion which, is what board member Alan Dyer brings.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | September 7, 2011
America is in crisis. The new normal is not good enough. The unemployed can't find jobs, the old can't retire and those in between live in constant fear of being tapped on the shoulder and thrust into the abyss. Property values are lower than a snake's belly, stocks are diving and gold - the "fear asset" - seems the only sound investment. Thursday, President Barack Obama will address Congress and is expected to propose ideas that only maintain the status quo, or perhaps even make things worse.
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