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By New York Times News Service | September 25, 1992
New York--For three months now, the talk of the town has been about Tina's tightrope.How will Tina Brown, the flamboyant former editor in chief of Vanity Fair, take her panache to the statuesque New Yorker without losing all those hard-core readers who have spent the summer in distressed anticipation of her arrival?This week, in the middle of closing her first issue, which will hit the newsstands on Monday, Tina talked.Distressed readers, just listen."Basically, my whole thrust has been to go back to Ross' magazine," she said of Harold Ross, the New Yorker's brilliant, eccentric founder, who edited the magazine from 1925 to 1951.
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NEWS
By Maria Russo and Maria Russo,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2008
The Daily Beast, Tina Brown's culture and news Web site, went up Monday, and in case any puzzlement remained about what she's up to, there's a long Q&A with Brown laying it out. The site, she says, is not an "aggregator," as some have called it. Meaning it will not merely collect stories a la Yahoo News but will "sift, sort and curate" the Web every day, combining original stuff with links to other sites' content. Whether that's "aggregation" or not, it's a fairly standard approach to the Web. So Brown includes the key question in her Q&A: "Why should I visit you?"
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NEWS
July 15, 1998
IF the New Yorker were just another magazine, nobody would care who edits it or how. Because it has been unique, because its intelligence and taste have been so high, people do care.Tina Brown, the first female editor after three males, the first English after three Americans, the first splashy journalist after three intellectuals, shook readers up.To save taste, she introduced vulgarity; to preserve tradition, she offended it; to rescue style, she substituted fashion; to preserve worth, she added celebrity.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | July 3, 2007
The publication of Tina Brown's new biography of Princess Diana, The Diana Chronicles, coming as it does on the heels of Paris Hilton's bizarre jailhouse theater, serves to remind us that, once upon a time, we had much more interesting princesses. The cult of celebrity and the breathless coverage of beautiful, wealthy people with no discernible purpose on this earth has certainly found its nadir with vacuous Paris, who told Larry King that she found God and serious purpose while behind bars for driving without a license.
NEWS
By Maria Russo and Maria Russo,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2008
The Daily Beast, Tina Brown's culture and news Web site, went up Monday, and in case any puzzlement remained about what she's up to, there's a long Q&A with Brown laying it out. The site, she says, is not an "aggregator," as some have called it. Meaning it will not merely collect stories a la Yahoo News but will "sift, sort and curate" the Web every day, combining original stuff with links to other sites' content. Whether that's "aggregation" or not, it's a fairly standard approach to the Web. So Brown includes the key question in her Q&A: "Why should I visit you?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary K. Feeney and Mary K. Feeney,Hartford Courant | December 5, 1999
Cole Porter's "Just One of Those Things" laments an affair that was "too hot not to cool down." These days, Talk magazine seems to be suffering the same problem.Last summer, Talk was white-hot news, from coverage of the magazine's launch party on New York's Liberty Island to the controversial cover story on Hillary Rodham Clinton. Talk was humming down the news pipeline even before the first issue had its premiere in August. Talk about Talk began in 1998, when editor in chief Tina Brown resigned from the New Yorker and announced plans to create a new publishing venture in partnership with Miramax.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
Here's the news: Talk magazine is, well, a magazine. This is news because we live in 1999 in the United States of Marketing and to experience the "buzz" on the arrival of Talk is to experience some disconnect the moment you actually get it and begin reading. One is led to expect something like the climactic scene in "Raiders of the Lost Ark." Surely some revelation is at hand. After all, there's former New Yorker and Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown running the words side, Conde Nast veteran Ron Galotti running the money side, a partnership of Miramax Films and Hearst Communications, dazzling advertisers and a "rollout" approaching George Lucas volume.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 4, 1993
Psst. Anybody wanna be president of Guatemala?If it's all-out war between Clinton and the insurance industry, don't bet against the insurance industry.Next, the FDA will ban cigarettes on grounds of failing to deliver the satisfaction promised in the ads.A jury in San Francisco has driven the last nail in the coffin of William Shawn's journalism and given license to Tina Brown to reform the New Yorker all she wants.
NEWS
July 5, 1992
Tina Brown, editor of the sassy and hugely successful Vanity Fair magazine, seems an unlikely choice to head the staid but venerable New Yorker -- so unlikely that one observer suggested her appointment was a bit like choosing Madonna to direct the New York City Ballet.Yet Ms. Brown's talent for combining glamour, gossip and good writing in a stylish package is not so far afield from the magazine's traditions. Founder Harold Ross, who edited the 67-year-old magazine until his death in 1951, shaped a periodical that was never boring.
FEATURES
By ALICE STEINBACH | July 5, 1992
When I arrived at the office last Wednesday, I found this message from a friend waiting in my voice mail:"The sky is falling! The sky is falling! Call me the minute you get in."It's funny. But right away I knew the message referred to the earthquake in New York. The one that occurred when it was announced: "Vanity Fair's Tina Brown to Take Over at the New Yorker."It was stunning news. And as word spread that the 38-year-old, British-born Vanity Fair editor -- the one who last year featured a naked, very pregnant Demi Moore on the magazine's cover -- was to take up the reins at the venerable New Yorker, it quickly became the Talk of the Town.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary K. Feeney and Mary K. Feeney,Hartford Courant | December 5, 1999
Cole Porter's "Just One of Those Things" laments an affair that was "too hot not to cool down." These days, Talk magazine seems to be suffering the same problem.Last summer, Talk was white-hot news, from coverage of the magazine's launch party on New York's Liberty Island to the controversial cover story on Hillary Rodham Clinton. Talk was humming down the news pipeline even before the first issue had its premiere in August. Talk about Talk began in 1998, when editor in chief Tina Brown resigned from the New Yorker and announced plans to create a new publishing venture in partnership with Miramax.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
Here's the news: Talk magazine is, well, a magazine. This is news because we live in 1999 in the United States of Marketing and to experience the "buzz" on the arrival of Talk is to experience some disconnect the moment you actually get it and begin reading. One is led to expect something like the climactic scene in "Raiders of the Lost Ark." Surely some revelation is at hand. After all, there's former New Yorker and Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown running the words side, Conde Nast veteran Ron Galotti running the money side, a partnership of Miramax Films and Hearst Communications, dazzling advertisers and a "rollout" approaching George Lucas volume.
NEWS
By Maureen Dowd | August 5, 1999
PIERCE and Demi and Liam were there. And Quentin and Salman and Spike and Amber. I never actually saw any of them. I had to content myself with glimpses of Kevin Bacon's pouffy hair and Madonna's pouffy biceps.Descend with me to the seventh circle of buzz, the ground zero of zing, the hub of hip, the Sodom of synergy. Beneath the Statue of Liberty the masses, the tired and unhumble, yearning to be chic, huddled at Tina Brown's Talk party. In the glow of Chinese lanterns, here was the perfect Gotham froth -- the maitre d' of the Four Seasons and the window dresser for Barneys and the publicist for Kevin Costner.
NEWS
July 15, 1998
IF the New Yorker were just another magazine, nobody would care who edits it or how. Because it has been unique, because its intelligence and taste have been so high, people do care.Tina Brown, the first female editor after three males, the first English after three Americans, the first splashy journalist after three intellectuals, shook readers up.To save taste, she introduced vulgarity; to preserve tradition, she offended it; to rescue style, she substituted fashion; to preserve worth, she added celebrity.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 14, 1998
NEW YORK -- The factions and feuds that have tried the soul of the nation's most prestigious magazine for the past six years may soon come to an end.That was how the New York publishing world received the news yesterday that Pulitzer Prize winner David Remnick -- the most acclaimed writer that Tina Brown hired during her six years as editor of the New Yorker magazine -- had been named as her successor.Brown is the one who engendered those feuds. The Old Guard, who worked for or simply cherished the New Yorker of the 1960s and '70s under William Shawn -- serious, restrained, deeply literary -- lambasted Brown as a betrayer of the tradition, a vulgarian obsessed with glitz, glamour and power-profiles.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOKS EDITOR Ann Hornaday and Stephen Proctor contributed to this report | July 12, 1998
And so, Tina Brown has abandoned the editorial helm of the New Yorker, indisputably the premier vehicle of serious journalism and literary fiction in the United States for two and more generations.Should real people care? Only if the event and its consequences are perceived to affect their lives. It's difficult to see how they will.This has not stilled the cacophony. Brown jilted S.I. Newhouse - owner, with his family, of the New Yorker - to run away with Mickey Mouse. A wailing sigh emanated from earnest souls and throats:"Will the Synergy Monster swallow up the exalted journalism we'd like to believe exists?
NEWS
By RICHARD RODRIGUEZ | February 20, 1995
I have been reading the February issue of Vanity Fair wherein Christopher Hitchens, a British subject, describes Mother Teresa ''the ghoul of Calcutta.'' Mr. Hitchens' essay -- ''Mother Teresa and Me'' -- is a justification of a television expose that he wrote and presented last year on Britain's Channel Four.Mr. Hitchens belongs among that generation of British journalists and editors -- amoral aliens -- who have invaded New York and Washington. These expats are like characters from a minor Evelyn Waugh novel; they are craven and coarse and contemptuous of the colonials.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | July 3, 2007
The publication of Tina Brown's new biography of Princess Diana, The Diana Chronicles, coming as it does on the heels of Paris Hilton's bizarre jailhouse theater, serves to remind us that, once upon a time, we had much more interesting princesses. The cult of celebrity and the breathless coverage of beautiful, wealthy people with no discernible purpose on this earth has certainly found its nadir with vacuous Paris, who told Larry King that she found God and serious purpose while behind bars for driving without a license.
NEWS
By RICHARD RODRIGUEZ | February 20, 1995
I have been reading the February issue of Vanity Fair wherein Christopher Hitchens, a British subject, describes Mother Teresa ''the ghoul of Calcutta.'' Mr. Hitchens' essay -- ''Mother Teresa and Me'' -- is a justification of a television expose that he wrote and presented last year on Britain's Channel Four.Mr. Hitchens belongs among that generation of British journalists and editors -- amoral aliens -- who have invaded New York and Washington. These expats are like characters from a minor Evelyn Waugh novel; they are craven and coarse and contemptuous of the colonials.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 4, 1993
Psst. Anybody wanna be president of Guatemala?If it's all-out war between Clinton and the insurance industry, don't bet against the insurance industry.Next, the FDA will ban cigarettes on grounds of failing to deliver the satisfaction promised in the ads.A jury in San Francisco has driven the last nail in the coffin of William Shawn's journalism and given license to Tina Brown to reform the New Yorker all she wants.
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