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October 3, 1990
Barry Levinson's new filmed-in-Baltimore movie, "Avalon," opens Friday at the Senator Theatre.Before you go out to see it, Accent would like to know which of the six previous Levinson-directed films is your favorite. "Diner" (1982) and "Tin Men" (1987) were Baltimore stories and filmed here, but Levinson won an Academy Award for best director for "Rain Man," (1988), which many consider to be his finest achievement to date. Levinson's other directorial efforts were "The Natural" (1984), "Young Sherlock Holmes" (1985)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
The Hollywood Diner is closing.  UPDATE Sept. 24, 2:55 p.m. : There might be a Hollywood ending after all. Cheryl Townsend, the diner's operater, said on Saturday afternoon that the cafe operation will remain open at least through the end of 2011. More to come. UPDATE Sept. 22, 10:55 a.m.: According to Cheryl Townsend, the diner's operator, the diner could close as early as Friday, Sept. 23. "We're playing it by ear," Townsend said. The Downtown restaurant, which has operated since March as Hollywood Diner presents Red Springs Cafe, will cease its cafe operations on Friday, Sept.
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FEATURES
October 1, 1990
Barry Levinson's latest film, "Avalon," begins its exclusive Baltimore run Friday at the Senator Theater, 5904 York Road. Today, tomorrow and Wednesday, the movie house will be hosting a Barry Levinson retrospective.Today's feature is the 1982 Levinson movie "Diner" (rated R). Tomorrow is the 1987 film "Tin Men" (R) and on Wednesday the Senator will feature, from 1985, "Young Sherlock Holmes" (PG-13).Show times are 1, 4, 7:30 and 10 p.m. daily at regular admission prices.On Thursday the Senator will celebrate its 51st anniversary by presenting the 1939 comedy, "Bachelor Mother," starring Ginger Rogers and David Niven and directed by Garson Kanin.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Werner's luncheonette, a downtown fixture since 1950 that was a gathering spot for politicians and lawyers as well as office workers and citizens serving jury duty, is closing Friday. Coming just a few months after the demise of Burke's restaurant, the closing of Werner's leaves downtown Baltimore without a single eatery dating from before the urban renaissance of the early 1960s — at least none with the pedigree of Werner's. One by one, they've closed: the House of Welsh in 1998, Marconi's in 2005 and Martick's in 2008, not to mention dozens of luncheonettes, diners and cafeterias.
FEATURES
October 4, 1990
Although Barry Levinson has filmed several movies in Baltimore and about Baltimore, the favorite Levinson movie among "It's Your Call" respondents is "Rain Man."Levinson's newest film, "Avalon," is set to open locally tomorrow. Accent wanted to know which of Levinson's six previous films was nearest and dearest to the hearts of our readers. Of the 247 people who called in, 79 liked "Rain Man" best. That is almost twice the number who voted for the other films. "Rain Man, released in 1988, won Levinson the Academy Award for best director.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
The Hollywood Diner is closing.  UPDATE Sept. 24, 2:55 p.m. : There might be a Hollywood ending after all. Cheryl Townsend, the diner's operater, said on Saturday afternoon that the cafe operation will remain open at least through the end of 2011. More to come. UPDATE Sept. 22, 10:55 a.m.: According to Cheryl Townsend, the diner's operator, the diner could close as early as Friday, Sept. 23. "We're playing it by ear," Townsend said. The Downtown restaurant, which has operated since March as Hollywood Diner presents Red Springs Cafe, will cease its cafe operations on Friday, Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
Werner's luncheonette, a downtown fixture since 1950 that was a gathering spot for politicians and lawyers as well as office workers and citizens serving jury duty, is closing Friday. Coming just a few months after the demise of Burke's restaurant, the closing of Werner's leaves downtown Baltimore without a single eatery dating from before the urban renaissance of the early 1960s — at least none with the pedigree of Werner's. One by one, they've closed: the House of Welsh in 1998, Marconi's in 2005 and Martick's in 2008, not to mention dozens of luncheonettes, diners and cafeterias.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 28, 1991
THE ACADEMY Awards this week put me in mind of movies. Here are some thoughts that movies put me in mind of while watching them, usually on a VCR years after everybody else has seen them:"Death in Venice" -- This is a pretty movie and it's doing a nice job of creating the funereal air of Thomas Mann's novel. But it is long. Long, long. Long. When did movRussellBakeries start lasting forever?Venice full of plague! Hey, I'd forgotten this: Dirk Bogarde is suffering. Long. The audience is suffering.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | November 22, 1998
Three teen-age boys sit in a red vinyl booth in the Hollywood Diner, slurping Cokes and chocolate milkshakes. They're talking about girls and cars and music. And an impending double date. Does Sylvia "put out"? Do you think she might put out? How about her friend?After some more adolescent banter, Sylvia's date - an angelic-looking kid with soft brown curls and even softer green eyes - produces a quarter from his pocket and tosses it. The coin will decide which of his two friends will be the fourth at a James Brown concert, the adventure's sexual anticipation made even more tantalizing by the prospect of crossing the color line.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 9, 1994
Washington -- Barry Levinson looks like a Grateful Dead disciple lost in the fancy of the Four Seasons Hotel on the edge of Georgetown. His gray hair backs up to a near-ponytail, and he's laid back enough that you want to plug him into an electrical outlet. Get some juice flowing through him.He's gracious and probably bored. He wants hot tea, please. And you know, the air in hotels doesn't seem quite right for some reason.This just isn't his scene.To plug his latest movie, Mr. Levinson has to talk about the exact thing he does not like talking about.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | November 30, 2000
Dancing Dorothys, tin men and scarecrows Most of us are familiar with the 1939 MGM classic "The Wizard of Oz." But did you know the movie, in all its Technicolor splendor, was based on a tale that by then was nearly 40 years old? A century ago, L. Frank Baum turned his fascination with make-believe into the characters of the Tin Man, Dorothy, the Scarecrow and the Cowardly Lion when he wrote "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz." Baum followed the book, an instant children's hit, with 13 others that chronicled Dorothy's fantastic adventures.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | November 22, 1998
Three teen-age boys sit in a red vinyl booth in the Hollywood Diner, slurping Cokes and chocolate milkshakes. They're talking about girls and cars and music. And an impending double date. Does Sylvia "put out"? Do you think she might put out? How about her friend?After some more adolescent banter, Sylvia's date - an angelic-looking kid with soft brown curls and even softer green eyes - produces a quarter from his pocket and tosses it. The coin will decide which of his two friends will be the fourth at a James Brown concert, the adventure's sexual anticipation made even more tantalizing by the prospect of crossing the color line.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 26, 1996
The "Tin Men" didn't just do houses.While the smooth-talking aluminum siding salesmen in Barry Levinson's movie were smothering suburban bungalows in the 1960s, an equally tenacious breed of contractors was wreaking havoc on commercial buildings downtown.These urban Tin Men convinced property owners that a new surface could make their buildings look modern while providing protection from the elements. What they did not mention was that their maintenance-free products invariably sapped all the charm and character from buildings.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 10, 1995
A few days ago, my wife and I experienced simultaneous psychotic episodes and decided to have the aluminum siding on our house replaced.So we looked in the Yellow Pages for people who do this sort of work. They're easy to find. All you do is look for the little picture of the contractor wearing a ski mask and waving a gun at the homeowner, who has his hands in the air.That's a joke, only it isn't a joke at times, if you catch my drift.Anyway, we got in touch with three contractors. All promised to send someone out right away to give us a free estimate.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 9, 1994
Washington -- Barry Levinson looks like a Grateful Dead disciple lost in the fancy of the Four Seasons Hotel on the edge of Georgetown. His gray hair backs up to a near-ponytail, and he's laid back enough that you want to plug him into an electrical outlet. Get some juice flowing through him.He's gracious and probably bored. He wants hot tea, please. And you know, the air in hotels doesn't seem quite right for some reason.This just isn't his scene.To plug his latest movie, Mr. Levinson has to talk about the exact thing he does not like talking about.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 28, 1991
THE ACADEMY Awards this week put me in mind of movies. Here are some thoughts that movies put me in mind of while watching them, usually on a VCR years after everybody else has seen them:"Death in Venice" -- This is a pretty movie and it's doing a nice job of creating the funereal air of Thomas Mann's novel. But it is long. Long, long. Long. When did movRussellBakeries start lasting forever?Venice full of plague! Hey, I'd forgotten this: Dirk Bogarde is suffering. Long. The audience is suffering.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | November 30, 2000
Dancing Dorothys, tin men and scarecrows Most of us are familiar with the 1939 MGM classic "The Wizard of Oz." But did you know the movie, in all its Technicolor splendor, was based on a tale that by then was nearly 40 years old? A century ago, L. Frank Baum turned his fascination with make-believe into the characters of the Tin Man, Dorothy, the Scarecrow and the Cowardly Lion when he wrote "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz." Baum followed the book, an instant children's hit, with 13 others that chronicled Dorothy's fantastic adventures.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 10, 1995
A few days ago, my wife and I experienced simultaneous psychotic episodes and decided to have the aluminum siding on our house replaced.So we looked in the Yellow Pages for people who do this sort of work. They're easy to find. All you do is look for the little picture of the contractor wearing a ski mask and waving a gun at the homeowner, who has his hands in the air.That's a joke, only it isn't a joke at times, if you catch my drift.Anyway, we got in touch with three contractors. All promised to send someone out right away to give us a free estimate.
FEATURES
October 4, 1990
Although Barry Levinson has filmed several movies in Baltimore and about Baltimore, the favorite Levinson movie among "It's Your Call" respondents is "Rain Man."Levinson's newest film, "Avalon," is set to open locally tomorrow. Accent wanted to know which of Levinson's six previous films was nearest and dearest to the hearts of our readers. Of the 247 people who called in, 79 liked "Rain Man" best. That is almost twice the number who voted for the other films. "Rain Man, released in 1988, won Levinson the Academy Award for best director.
FEATURES
October 3, 1990
Barry Levinson's new filmed-in-Baltimore movie, "Avalon," opens Friday at the Senator Theatre.Before you go out to see it, Accent would like to know which of the six previous Levinson-directed films is your favorite. "Diner" (1982) and "Tin Men" (1987) were Baltimore stories and filmed here, but Levinson won an Academy Award for best director for "Rain Man," (1988), which many consider to be his finest achievement to date. Levinson's other directorial efforts were "The Natural" (1984), "Young Sherlock Holmes" (1985)
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