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NEWS
May 2, 1994
When commercial shuttle boats extend their regular service to the Baltimore Museum of Industry this summer, this institution near Locust Point becomes part of the Inner Harbor's attractions. It is about time. In the past 17 years, the museum has grown from a desk at City Hall to a most intriguing collection of Baltimore nostalgia."We have one of the largest educational programs of any museum in Baltimore," Dennis Zembala, the museum's director, remarked recently as a dozen school children were hard at work in a play cannery, shucking oysters and trying to relive a typical Baltimore industrial experience of some hundred years ago.A total of 40,000 pupils are expected to visit the Key Highway museum this year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Last week, Thomas Rhett walked with his wife through a Nashville Walmart in search of an electric dog fence. While strolling the aisles, the 24-year-old country singer-songwriter passed the music section and spotted his debut album, October's “It Goes Like This,” on the shelves. “There's a Walmart literally every five miles from here to Seattle, Washington,” Rhett said on the phone afterward. “Knowing that your face is on all those racks in Target, Best Buy and all those places, it makes you feel very, very small.” As his star has grown among the country ranks, Rhett - who plays a free Power Plant Live concert on Friday to celebrate the opening of new country bar Tin Roof - has embraced humility.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | November 30, 2000
Dancing Dorothys, tin men and scarecrows Most of us are familiar with the 1939 MGM classic "The Wizard of Oz." But did you know the movie, in all its Technicolor splendor, was based on a tale that by then was nearly 40 years old? A century ago, L. Frank Baum turned his fascination with make-believe into the characters of the Tin Man, Dorothy, the Scarecrow and the Cowardly Lion when he wrote "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz." Baum followed the book, an instant children's hit, with 13 others that chronicled Dorothy's fantastic adventures.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Kline and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Welcome back, Homelanders - let's get caught up. First of all, our heroes Carrie and Saul (using aliases “Claire Danes” and “Mandy Patinkin,” respectively) have been flattered by some awfully breathless press coverage over the past month. If you didn't get a chance to read their profiles in The New Yorker and New York Times Magazine , I'll give you the recap, so to speak: they are the awesome genius intellectuals of the acting world. Claire told the paper of record that  “Mandy is obviously verging on legend.” Mandy says Claire sent him a two-page recipe for roasted chicken!
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | November 14, 1991
While speaking from guitarist Reeves Gabrels' hotel room in London recently, David Bowie ribbed his latest songwriting collaborator at every turn. Of course, all the while, Gabrels, an American, cursed him feverishly in the background."
BUSINESS
October 4, 1995
Bethlehem Steel Corp. yesterday announced it will increase the price of tin-coated steel, made at its Sparrows Point steel mill in Baltimore County, by 4 percent on Jan. 2 to recoup increased production costs.The nation's second largest steel producer also said it is raising the price of electrolytic chromium coated steel, used for the ends of tin cans, by 5 percent.Bethlehem's price increase of tin-plated steel, which is priced from $1,200 to $1,400 a ton, comes less than a month after USX-U.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
Local members of Watson's Tin Box of Ellicott City, a Sherlock Holmes literary society, will introduce Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's intrepid fictional detective and talk about his world, his adventures and why people around the world continue to read and write about him. Characters from the stories will make an appearance. The program, to be held at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 13 at the east Columbia library, is to mark the start of a Sherlock Holmes essay contest for seventh-graders. Contestants will be asked to read The Speckled Band, a Holmes story, and write a five-paragraph analytical essay about it. Contest rules are available at www.hclibrary.
BUSINESS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | March 30, 1993
CarnaudMetalbox, a European company that for the past two decades has made and exported to the United States decorative tin containers for food, cosmetics and beverages, yesterday opened a $2.5 million plant in Belcamp.The Harford County plant will initially employ about 25 people and is expected to nearly double its work force during peak-demand holiday seasons -- Christmas and Easter. Within three years, the company estimates it will provide 35 to 55 jobs.For the U.S. market, the company will draw on its store of tooling -- up to 700 sizes, shapes and designs -- to make fancy tin-plate containers for leading brands of food, cosmetics, tea, coffee, wines and liquor, candy and other products.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | January 4, 1994
CHICAGO -- A research team has discovered the world's oldest tin mine, a lengthy network of narrow tunnels, as well as the bones of workers who apparently labored in them, in the mountains of southern Turkey.The find answers a long-standing puzzle of how people in the Middle East region, where experts believe the Bronze Age began, were able to obtain the key ingredient for the important alloy.The discovery of the nearly 5,000-year-old mine by Aslihan Yener, an assistant professor at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute and her colleagues, also fuels a current archaeological debate on how metal technology spread.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 20, 2007
I wish someone on the copy desk of The New York Times had picked up on and questioned Dave Anderson's use of "Bawlmore" in a column he wrote the day after the Colts put an end to purple mania and the Ravens' dream of possibly going all the way to the Super Bowl XLI. Anderson wrote that natives pronounced Baltimore as "Bawlmore," and then used it throughout the column. I reread it several times and wondered if it was a not-so-subtle way of making fun of how folks speak in these latitudes -- a linguistic put-down of the city.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
There is plenty of material to choose from when creating a kitchen backsplash. Glass, tile, embossed concrete, punched tin, stainless steel, curved glass, subway tiles, marble, natural stone. Designer Laura Kimball of LCK Interiors offers some advice for those planning a kitchen backsplash and how to coordinate it with your countertop. Granite counters will always get a "wow!" reaction, but often the marriage of counter and backsplash ends in irreconcilable differences. A few concepts to consider before making lasting and expensive mismatches: •Granite or composite stone counters can stand on their own; no need for the 4-inch matching backsplash if you are adding a full tile or stone backsplash.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2012
The tin mill operation at the Sparrows Point steel plant in Baltimore County will begin its shut down later this month and be entirely suspended by the end of April, according to a letter from the top union representative for the tin mill. "I met this morning with management to discuss the present and future plans for our Tin Mill," wrote Michael Baskerville in a letter with Friday's date to mill workers. "The Tin Mill is being put into what is called Asset Preservation Mode, because of the loss of annual contracts.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
The exterior of Lee and Sue Jensen's home in the Catonsville development of Fox Hall Farms is traditional and reserved. Like its connected group of neighbors, the Colonial-style facade features neutral-color siding, a brick chimney, multi-framed windows and a double-car garage. Even the street seems very quiet. But still waters run deep. A clue to its interior appears quickly, just beyond the front door, when Sue Jensen, by way of a greeting, reveals matter-of-factly, "Our mover said that a normal move is about 250 boxes.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | November 7, 2011
Do you think it gives Clarence Thomas a warm, fuzzy feeling to know he is one of Ann Coulter's blacks? That is how Coulter put it on Fox "News" while defending Herman Cain against sexual harassment charges that threatened to engulf his campaign last week. "Liberals," she said, detest black conservatives, but the truth is, "our blacks are so much better than their blacks. " "Our" blacks? Really? Social conservative pundits tend to be astonishingly obtuse when discussing race (see Exhibit A, above)
NEWS
By Jennifer Lynch | July 28, 2011
A'ight, Bal'more. It's that time of year again. Time to go downy ocean, hon. I have been goin' downy ocean for 38 years, never missed a year. As a child, vacation was the best week of the year. The anticipation was even better. For weeks leading up to the trip, my mother would bake dozens upon dozens of sweets. She and my aunt would go grocery shopping and fill two or three carts full of food until they were so overstuffed that our job as kids was rush around behind them like ball boys and girls, picking up any stray items that fell out as they tried to steer.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2010
The primary steel-making operations at Sparrows Point will remain idled for the rest of the year until market conditions improve, the Russian company that owns the Baltimore County mill announced Tuesday. The continued shutdown adds to renewed uncertainty for about 2,500 workers at the plant, which has seen periodic shutdowns and a succession of owners in recent years. Severstal North America, a subsidiary of one of the world's largest steelmakers, is reportedly looking to sell the Maryland mill and other financially strapped U.S. plants.
NEWS
April 27, 2003
The Carroll County Farm Museum is offering traditional-arts classes starting next month. "18th-Century American Painted Tinware": The cost is $40 for one day. Students will learn painting techniques on tinware projects from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. as follows: May 19 and June 3, round tin canister (intermediate level); May 29 and June 17, tin tray (beginner and intermediate). "American Folk Art Painting": Students will learn techniques of folk art painting from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. as follows: May 8, "Hearts & Flowers" painted planter (beginner and intermediate)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
Jack Edward Hodgson, manager of the old Tin Deco plant on Canton's waterfront, died of congestive heart failure Monday at Oak Crest Village in Parkville. The former Anneslie resident was 95. A longtime Continental Can executive who served in Baltimore and other cities, he later changed careers and taught business administration at the University of Baltimore. Born in Maywood, Ill., Mr. Hodgson was the third generation of his family to be involved in the can- and tin-making trade. His grandfather was an inventor of can-making machinery, and his father was a plant engineer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2009
THURSDAY DAVID KELTZ: POE IN PERSON: The Edgar Allan Poe impersonator performs tales of the macabre all weekend at Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. The celebration starts at 8 tonight with performances of "The Black Cat," "The Cask of Amontillado," "The Tell-Tale Heart," "Annabel Lee" and "The Raven." Classic tales will also be performed at 3 p.m. Saturday. Other programs, "Beyond the Grave" and "Humor & Horror," are performed throughout the weekend. Single tickets are $10-$20. A three-play package is available for $20-$40.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
For about half a century, the stocky brick building that stands on the border of Remington and Charles Village languished as tenants and owners came and went. Redevelopment efforts stalled, leaving pigeons, graffiti, vandals and the elements to steadily wear on this one-time tin can manufacturing plant. But for the past several months, neighbors have watched as workers in hard hats cleared decades worth of trash from the 80,000-square-foot building, which was built in 1874. Workers have installed new plumbing and are working on renovations that will maintain the building's status as a historic structure.
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