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ENTERTAINMENT
By Parijat Didolkar and Helen B. Jones | March 29, 2001
A look at segregation in Anne Arundel history From the end of the Civil War to the 1960s, public schools in Anne Arundel County were racially segregated, as they were in most of Maryland. Beginning Saturday, the story of Anne Arundel's African-American schools will be told visually at an exhibit at the Banneker-Douglass Museum called "Nothing But Pure Love for the Teachers: African-American Schools During a Century of Segregation." Wander through an actual-size replica of a one-room schoolhouse; read remembrances of the school system by former students, teachers and administrators; check out textbooks used by the children; and study a map of all the schools.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | June 5, 2006
Headmaster Randy S. Stevens surveyed the graduating seniors of St. Timothy's School - where the motto is French for "Truth without Fear" - and asked them to consider the example of a woman who once sat in their place. "There is no better role model for you today of someone that understands what St. Timothy's school mission really means than Kimberly Dozier," Stevens told the Class of 2006 yesterday during commencement exercises at the private boarding school for girls in Baltimore County.
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NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
A former English teacher at an exclusive Greenspring Valley girl's boarding school has been charged with molesting a student there, Baltimore County police said yesterday.Steven M. Neumeister, 42, was arrested Friday afternoon after returning to St. Timothy's School to visit former colleagues and students.He was charged with felony child abuse, battery and sexual abuse, accused of touching and fondling a 16-year-old girl, said police spokesman Bill Toohey. He was released on $5,000 bond, Toohey said.
FEATURES
By LIZ F. KAY AND JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and LIZ F. KAY AND JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTERS | May 31, 2006
As a teenager at St. Timothy's School, Kimberly Dozier developed an appreciation for history and a talent for writing. She hammered nails and painted sets for school plays, and sang opera. And when she took a stick to the face during a lacrosse game, she kept on playing -- with, her former coach recalled, what turned out to be a broken nose. "She's very, very diligent," said Louise Wharton Pistell, Dozier's coach and teacher in ninth grade. "Very serious. Very focused." Dozier, a CBS News correspondent who has chronicled conflicts in Afghanistan, the Balkans and other trouble spots, was being treated yesterday in a U.S. Army hospital for injuries suffered in a car bomb attack in Iraq that killed two of her co-workers.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
A veteran educator now working in Texas has been named interim head of St. Timothy's School in Stevenson. Henry Payson "Peter" Briggs Jr., temporary head at Fort Worth Country Day School in Fort Worth, will assume his post at St. Timothy's on Aug. 1, said Jan Milliken Russell, chairwoman of the board of trustees and a 1967 graduate of the private boarding and day school for girls. Briggs, 70, will replace Deborah M. Cook, who has been head of the school for nine years. Cook announced her resignation last month, saying she wanted to explore other professional opportunities.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 12, 2002
In Baltimore City Police believe man found dead at home likely knew killers A postal worker found dead in his bathtub, his body bound and shot, likely knew his killers, city police said yesterday, although they had no suspect and knew of no motive for the slaying Monday. Homicide Detective Roscoe Lewis said the killing of Bernard Martin, 33, of the 3500 block of Rosekemp Ave. was committed by more than one person. "Since there was no forced entry, we believe the victim knew his assailants," Lewis said, adding that no property was reported missing.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1997
*TC For want of a stream, a multimillion-dollar development plan went down the drain yesterday.And Green Spring Valley neighbors couldn't be happier.The controversial Bridle Ridge development, proposed for 90 acres of the St. Timothy's School campus in Stevenson, was rejected by a Baltimore County official because a small stream and some wetlands did not appear on the plan, which details homesites, roads and landscaping.In making his ruling, Deputy Zoning Commissioner Timothy Kotroco ended the hearing on the plan, which has been vehemently opposed by the community during the past 18 months.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1998
A long-controversial plan to develop part of St. Timothy's School campus got a warmer reception the second time around last night, but some members of the Green Spring Valley community still voiced concerns about traffic and environmental problems.During the meeting at Fort Garrison Elementary School, St. Timothy's presented two options for the 90 acres of woods and fields it intends to sell for a residential development to be known as Bridle Ridge.One option calls for 53 homes and the other for 58 -- both less dense than the original 64-home plan that has divided the Green Spring Valley neighborhood for more than two years.
NEWS
December 12, 1997
Show times for tomorrow's performance of "Alice in Wonderland" by the Pumpkin Theatre at the Hannah More Arts Center of St. Timothy's School were reported incorrectly in the Live section yesterday. The show will be performed only at 2 p.m.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 12/12/97
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1999
It might not be the final plan.A proposal to build 53 houses on 90 acres owned by St. Timothy's School in Stevenson -- which sparked one of Baltimore County's most bitter development battles in recent years -- could be changed, school and community leaders say.But, as part of a recent agreement, any changes could only reduce the number of homes in the Bridle Ridge development."
NEWS
April 20, 2006
On April 13, 2006, MIGNON ALGER BELL CAMERON of Bel Air, MD. A memorial service will be held in St. Mary's Episcopal Church, Abingdon, MD, on Tuesday, May 23, 2006, at 11 A.M. Interment was private. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Harford Day School, 715 Moores Mill Road, Bel Air, MD, 21014 or St. Timothy's School, 8400 Greenspring Avenue, Stevenson, MD, 21153-0643. Memory tributes may be made to the family atmccomasfuneralhome.com
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | April 19, 2006
Mignon A. B. Cameron, a founder of the Harford Day School who was recalled for her spirited and magnetic classroom style, died of a cancer-related illness Thursday at Franklin Square Hospital Center. The Bel Air resident was 75. She taught for two decades at the private Bel Air school, served as a trustee there and sat on the board of St. Timothy's School in Stevenson. "She loved people, especially young people, and had a particular soft spot for rambunctious, bad boys, adolescents whom she would magically inspire to draw out their best efforts," said her daughter, Annette Cameron Blum of Bel Air. "At the same time, she was an advocate for educating bright girls to become successful, morally centered young women."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anna Eisenberg | September 15, 2005
Clifford on stage Children's favorite oversized canine stars in Clifford the Big Red Dog LIVE! at the Hippodrome Theatre tomorrow and Saturday. Clifford joins his friends -- adored favorites such as Emily Elizabeth, Cleo and T-Bone -- on stage to present a charming new story created for his first live tour. The audience will sing along while learning lessons about friendship and teamwork. Performances are at 7 p.m. tomorrow and at 11 a.m., 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday at the Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St. Tickets cost $28 and are available at the Hippodrome Theatre box office or any Ticketmaster outlet.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2002
Randy Scott Stevens, a dean and teacher at a Massachusetts boarding and day school, has been named the head of St. Timothy's School in Stevenson, effective July 1. One of 40 candidates interviewed for the job, Stevens, 38, has been at the Northfield Mount Hermon School in Northfield, Mass. -- the largest boarding school in the country, with 910 students living on campus -- since 1997. He is the dean of student life and a member of the senior management team at the coeducational school.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 12, 2002
In Baltimore City Police believe man found dead at home likely knew killers A postal worker found dead in his bathtub, his body bound and shot, likely knew his killers, city police said yesterday, although they had no suspect and knew of no motive for the slaying Monday. Homicide Detective Roscoe Lewis said the killing of Bernard Martin, 33, of the 3500 block of Rosekemp Ave. was committed by more than one person. "Since there was no forced entry, we believe the victim knew his assailants," Lewis said, adding that no property was reported missing.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
A veteran educator now working in Texas has been named interim head of St. Timothy's School in Stevenson. Henry Payson "Peter" Briggs Jr., temporary head at Fort Worth Country Day School in Fort Worth, will assume his post at St. Timothy's on Aug. 1, said Jan Milliken Russell, chairwoman of the board of trustees and a 1967 graduate of the private boarding and day school for girls. Briggs, 70, will replace Deborah M. Cook, who has been head of the school for nine years. Cook announced her resignation last month, saying she wanted to explore other professional opportunities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | December 5, 1996
Scottish ChristmasYou can take the high road or the low road to the Baltimore Arena for a "Scottish Family Christmas" on Tuesday as the holidays are celebrated Scots-style. Peter Morrison, one of Scotland's most popular singers, serves as host for the production, which features sacred and secular holiday music from the Lowland Band of the Scottish Division together with The Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders and Dalriada Dance Group. Solos, sing-alongs and group numbers will be featured along with haunting bagpipe tunes, lively dance tunes and traditional carols.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charlotte Newman | April 27, 2000
Maryland Day 2000 If you'd like the opportunity to make slime, test a polygraph machine, visit an insect petting zoo, watch a hurricane, get tips on golf swings and enjoy a wide variety of live music and dance performances, attend Maryland Day 2000 at the University of Maryland, College Park. This free festival emphasizes learning, exploring and fun, while promoting the university as a member of the community. The entire campus will come alive with more than 200 activities for everyone to enjoy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | April 25, 2002
She travels by umbrella, is fond of exceptionally long words and knows that a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down. She's Mary Poppins, magical nanny extraordinaire. And this weekend and next weekend, you can catch Pumpkin Theatre's presentation of the musical comedy Mary Poppins at the Hannah More Arts Center in Stevenson. Baltimore playwright David Rawlings Brown adapted the classic P.L. Travers Mary Poppins stories for this musical presentation. Nancy Parrish Asendorf stars as the title character.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
The head of St. Timothy's School, a private girls boarding and day school in Stevenson, has resigned, effective at the end of the school year. Deborah M. Cook, head of St. Timothy's for nine years, said that it was a difficult decision to leave the school, but it was time for her to explore other professional opportunities. Cook, 51, said she and her family plan to stay in the Baltimore area for now. Cook, who said that St. Timothy's is well-positioned for new leadership, is not sure what her next career move will be, but it will be education in some form, she said.
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