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Timothy Murphy

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NEWS
September 29, 2003
Timothy Murphy Jr., a retired shipfitter and amateur historian, died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of undetermined causes. The Columbia resident was 82. Mr. Murphy was born in Providence, R.I., where he graduated from high school. He joined the Army Air Forces in 1942. He was an airplane mechanic and trained flight crews at air bases throughout the South during World War II. After he was discharged from the service, he returned to Rhode Island and worked at several jobs. He retired in 1982 from the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics, where he was a shipfitter who helped build nuclear submarines.
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NEWS
September 29, 2003
Timothy Murphy Jr., a retired shipfitter and amateur historian, died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of undetermined causes. The Columbia resident was 82. Mr. Murphy was born in Providence, R.I., where he graduated from high school. He joined the Army Air Forces in 1942. He was an airplane mechanic and trained flight crews at air bases throughout the South during World War II. After he was discharged from the service, he returned to Rhode Island and worked at several jobs. He retired in 1982 from the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics, where he was a shipfitter who helped build nuclear submarines.
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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 16, 1990
City Councilman Timothy D. Murphy, D-6th, chairman of the Taxation and Finance Committee, has applied for a vacancy on the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City.Murphy is among 25 people who are seeking to fill the seat left vacant when Judge Paul A. Smith was appointed to the Baltimore City Circuit Court in October.A lawyer for 13 years and a councilman for eight, Murphy said he long has had an interest in being a District Court judge."There comes a time when you explore new opportunities," said Murphy.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 26, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- At Yale in the poisonous academic year of 1969, a young man with poetic aspirations presented his summer's scribblings to Robert Penn Warren, the literary giant in residence there. He received an immediate but mystifying response."Boy, these poems don't scan," Warren observed.The young man, Timothy Murphy, didn't know what he was talking about. So Red Warren, a Pulitzer Prize-winner for fiction as well as one of the few great American poets of the last half-century, went to the blackboard.
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | August 2, 1994
School starts in less than a month -- Aug. 29 -- but there's still time for summer fun. For instance, there's a middle school pool party Aug. 11 at Running Brook community in Wilde Lake.There will be swimming and games, plus prizes. Pool membership is not required. The rain date will be Aug. 18. To register or for information, call 730-4744 or 992-3726.On rainy days and every weekday for nonswimmers, the Columbia Teen Center, at the Barn in Oakland Mills Village Shopping Center, is open Monday through Friday from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m.In addition to table tennis and hockey, soccer, basketball and football, there are trips, tournaments and projects.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 26, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- At Yale in the poisonous academic year of 1969, a young man with poetic aspirations presented his summer's scribblings to Robert Penn Warren, the literary giant in residence there. He received an immediate but mystifying response."Boy, these poems don't scan," Warren observed.The young man, Timothy Murphy, didn't know what he was talking about. So Red Warren, a Pulitzer Prize-winner for fiction as well as one of the few great American poets of the last half-century, went to the blackboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the sun | March 27, 2008
You don't have to major in math to recognize that Towson plus hamburgers equals a good idea. Brothers Michael and Timothy Murphy have put this equation to the test with the November opening of Burger Bros., a colorfully painted 30-seat shop in a great location on Allegheny Avenue. Thanks to their simple formula, burger lovers no longer have to choose between hockey-puck fast food and time-draining sit-down restaurants. -- Poor:]
NEWS
September 5, 2004
On September 3, 2004, FOLGER "Buddy" BROOKS of Perryville, MD. Beloved husband of Ella Sue Brooks (nee Wade). Devoted father of Harvey Lee Brooks, Tina Dianne Murphy, and Patricia Lynn Brooks. Loving son of Bertha Estelle Holcomb Brooks and the late Harvey Lee Brooks. Brother of Marie Lester and Rachel Johnson. Also survived by two grandchildren Kevin Brooks and Timothy Murphy and will also be missed by his four legged companions Sydney, Maggie and Inky. Services will be held in the family owned Mc Comas Funeral Home, P.A., Abingdon, MD on Tuesday, September 7, 2004, at 10 A.M. Interment will be in Harford Memorial Gardens, Aberdeen, MD. Friends may call at the funeral home in Abingdon on Monday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Those who desire may contribute to the American Cancer Society, P.O. Box 572, Bel Air, MD 21014.
NEWS
May 17, 2004
On May 14, 2004, REV. TIMOTHY M. MURPHY, O. SS.T., loving brother of Michael Murphy and Karen Hamai and her husband Kennett; uncle of Michael and Yelena Hamai, and great uncle of John and Sophia Hamai. The Trinitarians will celebrate a Funeral Mass in the Chapel of the Holy Trinity Monastery, 8400 Park Heights Avenue, Pikesville (for directions, call 410-486-5171), on Monday, May 17, at 11 A.M. Inurnment adjoining cemetery with a luncheon to follow at the monastery. Inquiries may be made to Lemmon Funeral Home of Dulaney Valley, Inc., 410-252-6000.
NEWS
By Martin C. Evans | December 11, 1990
The Baltimore City Council voted unanimously yesterday to require itself to hold public hearings before filling vacant council seats, a move that supporters said could help wrest the selection process from political organizations and open it to public scrutiny.The rules change, an adaptation of a proposal made by Council President Mary Pat Clarke, was hailed by some black council members, who said they were concerned that council members from the 6th District might ignore the aspirations of South Baltimore's growing black population should the delegation have a chance to fill a vacant seat.
NEWS
By NATALIE HARVEY | August 2, 1994
School starts in less than a month -- Aug. 29 -- but there's still time for summer fun. For instance, there's a middle school pool party Aug. 11 at Running Brook community in Wilde Lake.There will be swimming and games, plus prizes. Pool membership is not required. The rain date will be Aug. 18. To register or for information, call 730-4744 or 992-3726.On rainy days and every weekday for nonswimmers, the Columbia Teen Center, at the Barn in Oakland Mills Village Shopping Center, is open Monday through Friday from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m.In addition to table tennis and hockey, soccer, basketball and football, there are trips, tournaments and projects.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | November 16, 1990
City Councilman Timothy D. Murphy, D-6th, chairman of the Taxation and Finance Committee, has applied for a vacancy on the District Court of Maryland for Baltimore City.Murphy is among 25 people who are seeking to fill the seat left vacant when Judge Paul A. Smith was appointed to the Baltimore City Circuit Court in October.A lawyer for 13 years and a councilman for eight, Murphy said he long has had an interest in being a District Court judge."There comes a time when you explore new opportunities," said Murphy.
NEWS
July 9, 1994
Because they have to seek re-election so often, politicians by definition are people looking out for No. 1 -- themselves. This may not be such a bad thing, if they are otherwise guided by a sense of mission and duty. But if political juggling becomes all-consuming, the result too often is blinding opportunism that may serve the incumbent's self-interest but usually does little to advance the concerns of the constituency.The City Council's performance since last fall is a case in point.The start of the autumn session was impressive.
NEWS
September 17, 1994
Tuesday's primary election could have spelled worse trouble for Baltimore City, which lost one Senate seat and four House of Delegates seats in redistricting. But, overall, voters chose wisely. Instead of weakening the city's representation in Annapolis further, they strengthened it.The city's primary gains are in stark contrast to results in many counties.While Democratic voters in Baltimore renominated John A. Pica Jr., who chairs the city's Senate delegation, and effectively elected to the Senate Perry Sfikas and Nathaniel McFadden, voters in a Howard County-Prince George's district unceremoniously dumped Sen. Thomas Yeager, Howard-Baltimore County voters retired Sen. Nancy Murphy and Northwest Baltimore County constituents ousted Janice Piccinini.
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