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Timothy Mcveigh

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By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | May 18, 1997
Prosecutors have gone to great lengths to link Timothy McVeigh to the bombing. Here is a timeline of events based on evidence prosecutors have introduced.Sept. 28, 1994:A calling card issued by the magazine Spotlight was used three times to call raceways, from which the government alleges that McVeigh and Terry Nichols sought to buy racing fuel, a key component in ammonium nitrate fuel oil bombs.Oct. 1, 1994:Marion, Kan., rock quarry is robbed and explosives are taken. McVeigh and Nichols are allegedly responsible for the robbery on the night during which a battery-powered Makita drill was used to open locks on sheds, according to testimony from their friend Michael Fortier.
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NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | May 17, 2011
Earlier this year, in the wake of the near-fatal shooting of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, I wrote two columns about violent rhetoric and actions in America. At the time, the convenient narrative in the mainstream media was that violent talk emanated equally from both sides of the political spectrum. I argued that such false equivalencies masked a more violent strain of language from conservative elites and more frequent use of violence by conservative activists. I challenged readers to cite chapter and verse of liberal transgressions of equal quantity or magnitude.
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FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | June 12, 2001
Timothy McVeigh departed in silence, sealing his last moments by passing to prison authorities a handwritten copy of a 19th-century poem called "Invictus," a 16-line ode to the drama of struggling stoically against overwhelming odds. At the top of the page in his rather delicate handwriting, McVeigh wrote "Final Written Statement by Timothy McVeigh," which might leave the impression that the words were his. They were composed by William Ernest Henley, a British poet, probably around 1875.
NEWS
August 23, 2010
The debate about the location of a mosque in New York City has reached a point beyond ridiculous and has become a dangerous example of the intolerance of American citizens. Equating an entire religion with terrorism is ignorance and bigotry. Think back several years ago when the federal building in Oklahoma City was bombed by Timothy McVeigh, a man who was raised as a Christian. I don't recall any outrage or debate about the proximity of Christian churches to the bombing site. I don't recall anyone stating that Christian churches near the site would be an insult to the memory of the people who died there.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2001
Timothy McVeigh's death will be the most public execution since a murderer named Roscoe Jackson was hanged at dawn on May 21, 1937, in the Ozark hill town of Galena, Mo. Perhaps 300 people will watch McVeigh die on closed circuit video or at the death chamber in the Federal prison at Terra Haute, Ind., not so many less than the 400 invited to Jackson's execution by the sheriff of Stony County, Mo. But lots of kids climbed trees to look over the stockade...
NEWS
By Ingo Hasselbach | April 28, 1995
I HAPPENED to arrive in the United States from Germany for the first time two days before the bombing in Oklahoma City.Watching the coverage on television, I was surprised to see the way the media handled possible ties between extremist groups such as the Michigan Militia and the man charged with the bombing, Timothy McVeigh.The experts being interviewed and the commentators seem to present at face value the group's contention that, since it was not directly tied to the event, it does not bear any responsibility.
TOPIC
By Stephen Vicchio | June 17, 2001
"Gentle vengeance may be easier for the exactor, but is it justice?" -- Aeschylus "Seven Against Thebes" TIMOTHY McVeigh is dead. Six years ago, on a sunny spring morning in the heartland of America, this son of a General Motors auto plant worker and a stay-at-home mother filled a rented truck with ammonium nitrate and racing fuel and walked to safety a few blocks away as the explosion he intended destroyed a federal office building and the lives of...
NEWS
August 23, 2010
The debate about the location of a mosque in New York City has reached a point beyond ridiculous and has become a dangerous example of the intolerance of American citizens. Equating an entire religion with terrorism is ignorance and bigotry. Think back several years ago when the federal building in Oklahoma City was bombed by Timothy McVeigh, a man who was raised as a Christian. I don't recall any outrage or debate about the proximity of Christian churches to the bombing site. I don't recall anyone stating that Christian churches near the site would be an insult to the memory of the people who died there.
NEWS
June 14, 1997
EVEN FOR those who oppose capital punishment, the case of Timothy McVeigh was a hard one. The monumental nature of his crime and his gruesome success in carrying out his diabolical plans made it difficult not to say that only the most severe and final punishment would do justice.Yet we can't agree with the 12 jurors' decision yesterday in Denver that McVeigh should be put to death. In weighing aggravating factors -- such as the intentional deaths and injuries to so many people, the careful planning and skill it took to cause so much destruction -- against mitigating factors like his honorable military service, they found little contest.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
A 54-year-old social worker who collected $545,000 in fraudulent claims for counseling children and the elderly was sentenced to three years in prison yesterday by a judge who compared the defendant's explanations to those given by Timothy McVeigh's lawyers.In Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, Ronald J. Doswell of the 3300 block of The Alameda blamed his troubles on the Internal Revenue Service, which he said had hounded him since 1989, when he pleaded guilty to filing a false tax return.
NEWS
May 4, 2010
Investigators are still sifting through the evidence left behind by Saturday's would-be car bomber, whose explosives-packed Nissan Pathfinder was discovered in New York's Times Square just as evening theater-goers converged on the district. Though the bomber's identity remains unknown, one thing is already clear: Whoever planned the attack intended to do grievous harm. Had the explosives detonated, the crude device might have killed or injured scores of innocent bystanders, and possibly many more.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 1, 2004
McALESTER, Okla. - When Bill Rayburn says that death is the easy way out, folks around here tend to listen. At 87, Rayburn is old enough to remember how the Depression nearly snuffed out small towns like this. He nearly lost his life in the Battle of the Bulge, earned two Purple Hearts in three wars and has seen things on a battlefield that gentlemen don't speak about in public. Sure, he says, he wants to see Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols die. He just wants it to take a while.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | June 19, 2001
AUSTIN, Texas - "Invictus"?! Lord save us, what a sick man. Talk about delusional. That Timothy McVeigh, mass murderer of children, saw himself as the master of his ship and the captain of his soul is beyond irony. Now he's going to ruin a perfectly good minor poem. To the extent that Timothy McVeigh can be understood - or that we'd want to understand him - he obviously considered himself part of the warrior culture. Warrior mythology is an ancient and in some ways still-noble ideal.
TOPIC
By Stephen Vicchio | June 17, 2001
"Gentle vengeance may be easier for the exactor, but is it justice?" -- Aeschylus "Seven Against Thebes" TIMOTHY McVeigh is dead. Six years ago, on a sunny spring morning in the heartland of America, this son of a General Motors auto plant worker and a stay-at-home mother filled a rented truck with ammonium nitrate and racing fuel and walked to safety a few blocks away as the explosion he intended destroyed a federal office building and the lives of...
NEWS
June 17, 2001
Edison's schools are on the right track for academic success The three Baltimore schools managed by Edison Schools since fall 2000 - Gilmore, Montebello and Templeton elementary schools - were historically among the lowest-performing elementary schools in the city. In the first year of operation under Edison, these three schools have shown remarkable improvement in 12 out of 15 measures in reading and 11 out of 15 measures in math on the Comprehensive Test of Basic Skills (CTBS). The statistics used by Sam Stringfield in his column "Edison schools progressed?"
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | June 14, 2001
ATLANTA - Rationalizing his terrorism to the end - the big, bad government made him do it - Timothy McVeigh was just the fellow to restart the federal death penalty after 38 years of disuse. The matter, however, begins to get dicier with the next in line. As a candidate for execution, McVeigh had even some death-penalty opponents ready to make an exception: Murderer of 168, guilty by his own admission, unrepentant. And white, middle class and well brought up, he spared the restart of federal executions any immediate second thoughts about racial or social bias in the system.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1997
DENVER -- After a long and painful vigil, the families of the victims that gathered last night said they found little solace in the verdict in the Terry L. Nichols trial."
NEWS
By Chip Berlet | April 19, 2000
FIVE YEARS AGO today, Timothy McVeigh parked a rental truck full of homemade explosives in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The explosion was devastating, killing 167 people and wounding more than 750. Images of heroic rescue workers pulling the mangled bodies of children from the rubble are seared into our psyche. McVeigh is often described as an extremist, but that term masks more than it reveals. More accurately, McVeigh is a right-wing populist, a purveyor of anti-government conspiracy theories, a racist, an anti-Semite and a terrorist.
NEWS
June 13, 2001
Nonprofits, citizens should help the city meet its fiscal needs Kudos to Johns Hopkins University President William R. Brody for taking a leadership position on helping the city deal with its financial woes ("Some nonprofits should ante up to aid Baltimore," Opinion Commentary, June 7). As I drive around the city, it is quite apparent that much valuable land is off the tax rolls by virtue of its use for educational and religious purposes. Having served here as a pastor in a Presbyterian church, I appreciate the clergy's wallet-sensitivity on this issue, but it would be a sign of good faith for all non-profits to make some voluntary contribution to show our extra-mile commitment to the common good.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 12, 2001
TERRE HAUTE, Ind. - His eyes wide open and his face betraying no emotion, Timothy J. McVeigh was executed by lethal injection yesterday, six years after the Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people and injured hundreds more. Inside the death chamber at the federal prison, the last words McVeigh heard were spoken by U.S. Marshal Frank Anderson: "Warden, we may proceed with the execution." With that, a combination of three chemicals was injected into a vein in McVeigh's right leg. The first left him unconscious.
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