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By MICHAEL J. BOYLE | June 6, 2006
East Timor, once viewed as a U.N. success story because the world body had backed an Australian intervention to rescue the impoverished island from the grips of the Indonesian army, has become beset by poverty and civil turmoil. The latest rioting, which forced more than 100,000 people from their homes, had nothing to do with the Indonesian army, which had occupied the tiny island for 27 years. This time it was rival gangs of desperate young men, aided and abetted by members of East Timor's army, that burned down buildings and attacked each other with machetes.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 2006
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Indonesia's defense minister warned Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld yesterday that Asia's Muslims increasingly believe that the United States is trying to use its economic and military power to dictate terms for carrying out the war on terrorism, a perception that risks alienating the very countries that the Bush administration needs as allies. In unusually blunt language after an hourlong meeting here with Rumsfeld, Juwono Sudarsono said that some Muslim nations see the United States as a threat to global stability and suggested that the Bush administration should allow national governments to come up with their own strategies to deal with Islamic extremism.
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NEWS
September 14, 1999
Yielding to intense international pressure, Indonesia agreed Sunday to allow United Nations peacekeepers into East Timor, where armed gangs have killed and pillaged without bridle since residents voted for independence two weeks ago.A remote jungle with a population only slightly larger than Baltimore's, East Timor has suddenly become grist for international summits, legislation in Congress and anguished pleas from human-rights advocates.President Clinton has promised to limit U.S. involvement to the supporting roles of intelligence, communication and shipping troops and equipment to Timor.
NEWS
By MICHAEL J. BOYLE | June 6, 2006
East Timor, once viewed as a U.N. success story because the world body had backed an Australian intervention to rescue the impoverished island from the grips of the Indonesian army, has become beset by poverty and civil turmoil. The latest rioting, which forced more than 100,000 people from their homes, had nothing to do with the Indonesian army, which had occupied the tiny island for 27 years. This time it was rival gangs of desperate young men, aided and abetted by members of East Timor's army, that burned down buildings and attacked each other with machetes.
NEWS
September 9, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Philadelphia Inquirer, which was published yesterday.ARMED thugs have killed hundreds in East Timor, a long-suffering land north of Australia. Thousands have fled by land, air or sea.Militias with guns, grenades and machetes are smashing the East Timorese for voting overwhelmingly to end Indonesia's 24-year occupation and become an independent nation.Indonesia's guarantee of order and safety after the plebiscite has proved worthless. The world community's reliance on that guarantee now looks naive.
NEWS
By Charles M. Madigan | September 28, 1999
CHANGE COMES HARD and in very small increments in the world of foreign policy, where a decades-old concern about violations of human rights is colliding with the self-interests and sovereignty of nations, even of nations that seem to have made strong commitments to the human rights agenda.Why did it take the United States so long to help craft a solution to the violence in East Timor when it was seemingly so aggressive in condemning human rights abuses in the former Yugoslavia? Why was Britain so passionate in its condemnation of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic and so late to the game in condemning the violence in East Timor?
NEWS
September 21, 1999
BEFORE East Timor's Aug. 30 referendum for independence, its destruction by militia and the United Nations occupation that began yesterday, Indonesia was in crisis.The cohesion of the world's fourth-biggest country, with 210 million people on thousands of islands speaking hundreds of dialects, is more important than the secession of some 800,000 on a lesser isle.If Australia is taking the lead in the force that will aid, guide and protect East Timor, Washington should concentrate on helping Indonesia evolve toward democracy, reduce its army's role, strengthen civil society, restore the economy and -- above all -- hold together.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2000
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Tens of thousands of East Timor refugees living in squalid camps on the West Timor border are running out of food and face starvation by the end of the month, government officials and aid workers in the divided island said yesterday. The officials called for quick intervention from the central government or the international community, saying they feared an outbreak of violence if the refugees become desperate for food and riot. International aid organizations had been providing some food and medical assistance to the refugee camps.
TOPIC
By IAN TIMBERLAKE | February 14, 1999
DILI, East Timor - An end to years of tragedy in this tiny province has never seemed so close. It has also never seemed so far.After more than two decades of bloody rule, Indonesia's foreign minister suddenly announced late last month that his country might consider independence for the impoverished half-island.But, as United Nations-sponsored talks on East Timor's future continued Monday in New York, the people of the mountain territory appear increasingly divided.Civilian militias who have armed themselves and vowed to defend East Timor's link with Indonesia are accused in the recent deaths of several unarmed civilians.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Sun staff writer Mark Matthews contributed to this article | May 31, 1998
EAST TIMOR, Indonesia -- More than a week after the fall of President Suharto, his picture still hangs in the El Turismo Hotel here -- a reminder of the long, brutal shadow the former Indonesian strongman continues to cast on this wind-swept, tropical island.As Indonesia's new administration releases political prisoners to change its authoritarian image, many here still live in fear of a military occupying force that rules through kidnappings, torture and executions, according to human rights groups and church workers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2006
DILI, EAST TIMOR --The police here, trained by the United Nations over the four years of this country's existence, melted away in the dilapidated capital yesterday, abandoning their stations for hiding places they felt would keep them safe from a vengeful military. Opposing gangs of young men, divided along lines of ethnicity and armed with rocks and machetes, roamed the streets setting fires that sent up thick smoke. All stores were closed. The city's handful of gas stations shut down when their Western owners, fearful that their employees would be attacked and their pumps emptied, were evacuated.
NEWS
May 28, 2006
WORLD Thousands die in Java quake Desperate relatives searched rubble for survivors yesterday after a powerful earthquake flattened nearly all the buildings in Bantul while residents slept, killing more than 3,500 people on Indonesia's densely populated Java island. pg 1a Mayhem spreads in Dili The police in Dili, East Timor, trained by the United Nations as a privileged force, have abandoned their stations for hiding places, looking for protection from a vengeful military. Chaos has engulfed the city after a week of violence between East Timor's security forces.
NEWS
January 29, 2005
Sprawl ruins the rolling hills of Maryland Some 50 short years ago, my brother and I would be picked up by a family friend on a July afternoon and begin an annual adventure, traveling from Towson through the Greenspring Valley out to Glyndon and Reisterstown and then onto Westminster and Taneytown, and ending up just shy of Emmitsburg at the friend's Hidden Valley Farm. At that time, Baltimore County and Carroll County were awash with greenery, canopies of trees, rolling hills and farm after farm.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2003
Before the snow storm and after the guy in Section 69 hollered "Kill Saddam!," Opening Day 2003 was a predictable affair of the baseball fan's heart. Then, things got a little weird. Here's the run-down: Gates opened: Noon. Orioles batting practice: From 12:25 to 1:25 p.m. Guy changed into freshly minted "Opening Day 2003" sweatshirt in front of Daily Grind window: 1:26 p.m. (Weather update: Cold, yes ma'am, but unstoppable fans march toward Oriole Park - "a certain kind of rest area or safe area," as Oriole manager Mike Hargrove this week called home field.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 15, 2002
Oxford Atlas of the World, 10th edition. Oxford, 448 pages, $75. There are several worthy world atlases. Characteristically, they go through frequent edition changes, as borders, country names and other considerations change. Typically, they are big enough to hold open the most obstreperous of doors -- and it is approximately as dangerous to begin to leaf through one as it is to put a half-gallon bowl of popcorn beside your easy chair. With respect for all, my far favorite is the Oxford atlas, and by chance its brand-new 10th edition is out this month, with innovations right up to and including recognition of East Timor, which was formed on May 20 of this year.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 1, 2002
JAKARTA, Indonesia - An Indonesian human rights court has acquitted four former security officials, including two army officers, on charges of crimes against humanity during the bloodshed that engulfed East Timor three years ago. The court's decision Friday means that 10 Indonesian security officials who have been tried for crimes against humanity in the former Indonesian territory have been acquitted. The Bush administration had pressed Indonesia for convictions that would hold the military accountable for the slaughter in East Timor before and after a United Nations-sponsored referendum on independence in August 1999.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2006
DILI, EAST TIMOR --The police here, trained by the United Nations over the four years of this country's existence, melted away in the dilapidated capital yesterday, abandoning their stations for hiding places they felt would keep them safe from a vengeful military. Opposing gangs of young men, divided along lines of ethnicity and armed with rocks and machetes, roamed the streets setting fires that sent up thick smoke. All stores were closed. The city's handful of gas stations shut down when their Western owners, fearful that their employees would be attacked and their pumps emptied, were evacuated.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 1999
DILI, East Timor -- Ending a failed 24-year occupation that culminated in a rampage of destruction, the last 900 Indonesian soldiers remaining on this island territory pulled down their red-and-white flag yesterday and began heading home.Their officers were seen off at the airport by the people who took their place: the United Nations representative; the Australian general who heads an international peacekeeping force; and Jose Alexandre Gusmao, the guerrilla chief who led a separatist war against them.
NEWS
By Mike Jendrzejczyk | September 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - Will U.S. training improve the Indonesian military's terrible human-rights record? During a visit to Jakarta in early August, Secretary of State Colin Powell vowed he would get Congress to restart a military training program suspended in 1992 after Indonesian troops committed atrocities in East Timor. He argued that exposing officers to democratic institutions and human-rights values would have beneficial effects. But this is a risky and questionable proposition at best. American taxpayers could end up helping to train killers and torturers.
NEWS
May 19, 2002
AT THE STROKE of midnight tonight, East Timor will become the world's newest nation, and one of its poorest -- that is, until its off-shore oil and gas reserves are tapped and flowing. After Portuguese rule for 400 years, Japanese occupation for three, Indonesian domination for 24 and interim U.N. administration for another three, the importance of this moment cannot be overstated for this half-island nation at the eastern end of the Indonesian archipelago. East Timor lost a third of its population under Indonesia's brutal rule.
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