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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Salvatore J. Russo, a retired Bethlehem Steel timekeeper and World War II veteran, died of diabetic complications Sunday at Emeritus Senior Living in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 94. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Florence and Antonio Russo, Italian immigrants who lived on Berger Avenue. After attending the Polytechnic Institute, he worked at the family's Belair Market fruit and produce business in Oldtown. Family members said he was inducted into the Army in early 1941.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Salvatore J. Russo, a retired Bethlehem Steel timekeeper and World War II veteran, died of diabetic complications Sunday at Emeritus Senior Living in Towson. The Cockeysville resident was 94. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Florence and Antonio Russo, Italian immigrants who lived on Berger Avenue. After attending the Polytechnic Institute, he worked at the family's Belair Market fruit and produce business in Oldtown. Family members said he was inducted into the Army in early 1941.
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FEATURES
By New York Times | December 31, 1991
NEW YORK -- When the New Year's ball descends in Times Square tonight, it will be for the second time this week. The first was a practice ceremony yesterday supervised by Tama Starr, the timekeeper for the event.Starr, president of Artkraft Strauss Sign Corp., is following in the footsteps of her grandfather Jacob Starr, who built the first New Year's ball in 1908. She will repeat the performance tonight.The ball is operated by a line and pulleys, and Starr is assisted by a crew including two electricians, two sign hangers and a sheet-metal worker.
SPORTS
By Dan Hickling and Dan Hickling,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2001
BRIDGEPORT, Conn. -- The lump-taking continued for the Baltimore Bayhawks, who yesterday wound up a lost weekend with a 12-9 loss to the Bridgeport Barrage. As they did in Saturday's 19-14 thumping by New Jersey, the Bayhawks were competitive in the first period, were strong-armed in the second quarter and never managed to make a complete recovery. "We've got to go back to the drawing board and get something going," said Baltimore attack Tom Marechek. "We can't just play 30 minutes a game.
NEWS
October 16, 1991
John R. LemenAutomobile dealerServices for John R. Lemen, a retired automobile dealer, will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Elkton Presbyterian Church.Mr. Lemen, who was 87 and lived in Elkton, died Sunday at Union Hospital there after an apparent heart attack.He retired in 1970 as owner of Rand Chevrolet, which he started in Elkton in 1957. He had earlier worked in automobile sales in Baltimore for about 30 years, for Anderson Chevrolet, Swartz Cadillac and Rea Keech Buick.Born in Baltimore, he was a 1924 graduate of City College and attended the Johns Hopkins University.
SPORTS
By Dan Hickling and Dan Hickling,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2001
BRIDGEPORT, Conn. -- The lump-taking continued for the Baltimore Bayhawks, who yesterday wound up a lost weekend with a 12-9 loss to the Bridgeport Barrage. As they did in Saturday's 19-14 thumping by New Jersey, the Bayhawks were competitive in the first period, were strong-armed in the second quarter and never managed to make a complete recovery. "We've got to go back to the drawing board and get something going," said Baltimore attack Tom Marechek. "We can't just play 30 minutes a game.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Joanna Daemmrich and David L. Greene and Joanna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2000
Amid the galas, countdowns, and Y2K/champagne-shortage scares of last December, some determined academics sent a message to everyone: You're celebrating early. Those experts - harshly criticized as fuddy-duddies with nothing better to do than ruin people's fun - maintained that official calendars mark the Third Millennium as beginning Jan. 1, 2001. Well, that date is upon us. The official beginning of a new age. The kind of momentous changeover that even your great-great-great-great-great grandchildren won't experience!
NEWS
By BARBARA TUFTY | June 30, 1992
''There's a time for some things, and a time for all things; a time for great things, and a time for small things.''-- Don Quixote, by Miguel de CervantesWashington -- Tick-tock-tick. That's one second. One second to be added to the age of our planet Earth. Today, precisely at 23 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds, Coordinated Universal Time, one leap-second will be added to clocks all over the world.This will be 7:59:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time the night before, when the extra second will be inserted in the atomic clock at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.
NEWS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
In 1802, Simon Willard was so proud of his newly patented Banjo clock that he decided to tell everyone about it.So he advertised the words, "Willard's Patent," on every Banjo clock he made.That may have been what impressed buyers, who made the clock a hot-selling item for years. But rival clockmakers remained unfazed. They noticed the clock's popularity, and they wanted to cash in on it. So, they blatantly ignored the patent, turning out Banjo clocks of their own. Soon, the clocks became so prolific that no one realized Willard was its inventor.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and By Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
Here's a Father's Day tale about a watch. It's a story of young engineers in a small Pennsylvania town helping reinvent timekeeping by developing the first all-digital wristwatch - the Pulsar. Mostly forgotten except by horologists and hard-core collectors, the Pulsar is credited by historians with everything from changing our perception of time to jump-starting the vast industry of electronic gadgets. The watch's story begins in 1967, with a plain-spoken engineer named John Bergey, who was the head of research and development at the Hamilton Watch Co. in Lancaster, Pa. For decades, Hamilton's products were standard issue among railroad conductors, ship captains and others who demanded precision timekeeping.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and By Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2001
Here's a Father's Day tale about a watch. It's a story of young engineers in a small Pennsylvania town helping reinvent timekeeping by developing the first all-digital wristwatch - the Pulsar. Mostly forgotten except by horologists and hard-core collectors, the Pulsar is credited by historians with everything from changing our perception of time to jump-starting the vast industry of electronic gadgets. The watch's story begins in 1967, with a plain-spoken engineer named John Bergey, who was the head of research and development at the Hamilton Watch Co. in Lancaster, Pa. For decades, Hamilton's products were standard issue among railroad conductors, ship captains and others who demanded precision timekeeping.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Joanna Daemmrich and David L. Greene and Joanna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | December 30, 2000
Amid the galas, countdowns, and Y2K/champagne-shortage scares of last December, some determined academics sent a message to everyone: You're celebrating early. Those experts - harshly criticized as fuddy-duddies with nothing better to do than ruin people's fun - maintained that official calendars mark the Third Millennium as beginning Jan. 1, 2001. Well, that date is upon us. The official beginning of a new age. The kind of momentous changeover that even your great-great-great-great-great grandchildren won't experience!
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2000
If Reason and Science had prevailed, there would be no foolishness about whether the millennium begins today or a year from now. It began a little more than 207 years ago on the First of Vendemiaire, Year I of the Republic. Alas, Superstition and Clericalism triumphed instead -- or perhaps it was the human resistance to change -- and so we continue to be enslaved by a time-keeping system associated with pagan and Christian supernaturalism. Rare is the child of the Enlightenment whose calendar marks today as 9 Nivose CCVIII.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The people at the U.S. Naval Observatory don't normally get dragged into petty arguments.They run the nation's master clock. The other clocks do what they say. They calculate the position of every planet, star, galaxy and quasar in the universe. They do math.But now, with the worldwide rush to capitalize on the new millennium, this unassuming Washington agency full of astronomers is tangled up in geopolitical and academic spats.From the South Pacific to Maine, countries, towns and nearly unheard-of spits of land are vying to be the first to see the sunrise Jan. 1 -- even as ordinary Americans are arguing about whether 2000 or 2001 is the true date of the new millennium.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1999
Got a sec?Michelangelo Capraro doesn't-- not anymore. These days the 24-year-old Web designer from Santa Monica, Calif., is living on Internet time.On a typical workday he rises at 700 beats. By 750 beats, he's in the office checking e-mail. At 900 beats, he faxes a lunch order to the Italian deli around the corner, which, he says, takes about half an hour to prepare. "Oops, I mean 20 beats," he corrects himself. At 170 beats, he logs off his PC and heads home.The "beats" that govern Capraro's life are the brainchild of Swatch, the cheeky Swiss watchmaker that is to the staid business of horology what Dennis Rodman is to basketball.
NEWS
By BARBARA TUFTY | June 30, 1992
''There's a time for some things, and a time for all things; a time for great things, and a time for small things.''-- Don Quixote, by Miguel de CervantesWashington -- Tick-tock-tick. That's one second. One second to be added to the age of our planet Earth. Today, precisely at 23 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds, Coordinated Universal Time, one leap-second will be added to clocks all over the world.This will be 7:59:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time the night before, when the extra second will be inserted in the atomic clock at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2000
If Reason and Science had prevailed, there would be no foolishness about whether the millennium begins today or a year from now. It began a little more than 207 years ago on the First of Vendemiaire, Year I of the Republic. Alas, Superstition and Clericalism triumphed instead -- or perhaps it was the human resistance to change -- and so we continue to be enslaved by a time-keeping system associated with pagan and Christian supernaturalism. Rare is the child of the Enlightenment whose calendar marks today as 9 Nivose CCVIII.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The people at the U.S. Naval Observatory don't normally get dragged into petty arguments.They run the nation's master clock. The other clocks do what they say. They calculate the position of every planet, star, galaxy and quasar in the universe. They do math.But now, with the worldwide rush to capitalize on the new millennium, this unassuming Washington agency full of astronomers is tangled up in geopolitical and academic spats.From the South Pacific to Maine, countries, towns and nearly unheard-of spits of land are vying to be the first to see the sunrise Jan. 1 -- even as ordinary Americans are arguing about whether 2000 or 2001 is the true date of the new millennium.
NEWS
By Donna Weaver and Donna Weaver,Staff writer | March 29, 1992
In 1802, Simon Willard was so proud of his newly patented Banjo clock that he decided to tell everyone about it.So he advertised the words, "Willard's Patent," on every Banjo clock he made.That may have been what impressed buyers, who made the clock a hot-selling item for years. But rival clockmakers remained unfazed. They noticed the clock's popularity, and they wanted to cash in on it. So, they blatantly ignored the patent, turning out Banjo clocks of their own. Soon, the clocks became so prolific that no one realized Willard was its inventor.
FEATURES
By New York Times | December 31, 1991
NEW YORK -- When the New Year's ball descends in Times Square tonight, it will be for the second time this week. The first was a practice ceremony yesterday supervised by Tama Starr, the timekeeper for the event.Starr, president of Artkraft Strauss Sign Corp., is following in the footsteps of her grandfather Jacob Starr, who built the first New Year's ball in 1908. She will repeat the performance tonight.The ball is operated by a line and pulleys, and Starr is assisted by a crew including two electricians, two sign hangers and a sheet-metal worker.
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