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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2004
Cable companies, which have been weighed down for years by heavy investments and sagging subscriber growth, are starting to turn the corner. Comcast Corp. said yesterday that it earned $262 million in the second quarter, after losing $22 million in the quarter last year, thanks to an increase in the number of customers signing up for high-speed Internet and digital video services. Comcast said it earned 12 cents a share, compared with a net loss of $22 million, or a penny a share, in the second quarter last year.
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SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 26, 2014
Marathon Tatyana McFadden to defend crown in Chicago Reigning women's wheelchair champion Tatyana McFadden (Atholton) will defend her title in the Oct. 12 Chicago Marathon, race officials announced. McFadden, 25, became last year the first wheelchair racer to sweep all four major marathons - Boston, London, Chicago and New York. She tried cross-country skiing after last season and won a silver medal at the Sochi Paralympics. Terps Comcast to open cable access for UM games Many Maryland fans will have easier access to the Big Ten Network under an agreement reached with Comcast, the network said Wednesday.
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BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 2002
AOL Time Warner Inc., AT&T Corp. and Comcast Corp., three of the world's biggest media and communications companies, plan to announce a $9 billion deal today to unravel a complicated venture that has bedeviled them for years. The deal, capping more than two years of tense negotiations, allows all sides to declare victory - although it may be more to the liking of AT&T and Comcast, which has 800,000 cable customers in Maryland. According to people briefed on the details, the agreement gives back to AOL Time Warner complete control of Time Warner Entertainment, which includes some of its key media properties, including the HBO pay-television operation and the Warner Brothers film studio.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Many Maryland fans will have easier access to the Big Ten Network under an agreement reached with Comcast, the network said Wednesday. Under the deal -- finalized before Maryland enters the Big Ten conference next Tuesday -- Comcast cable subscribers in the principal markets for Maryland and Rutgers will be able to access the network without subscribing to a separate sports tier.   The network is already available to most local Maryland fans, who often pay a fee added to their cable operators' bills for extra sports programming.
NEWS
By RICHARD J. DALTON JR. and RICHARD J. DALTON JR.,NEWSDAY | December 13, 2005
Bowing to government pressure, cable companies serving the majority of U.S. subscribers plan to offer family-oriented packages, industry executives said yesterday. Time Warner Cable, Comcast and several other cable networks accounting for 56 percent of subscribers will offer the option, said Paul Rodriguez, spokesman for the National Cable and Telecommunications Association. The president and chief executive of the trade group, Kyle McSlarrow, discussed family programming yesterday with the Senate Commerce Committee at a meeting on decency in programming.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 15, 2004
NEW YORK - Comcast Corp. and other cable operators won support yesterday from Republican and Democratic lawmakers who criticized an idea to let consumers buy channels individually rather than in packages. "We have a marketplace that is working," Rep. Fred Upton, the Michigan Republican who heads the House telecommunications subcommittee, said at a hearing. "The government must resist the urge to re-regulate and tinker with this marketplace." No bill has been introduced to require so-called a la carte service, which would dismantle the current system in which cable operators select the channels viewers get in packages.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Many Maryland fans will have easier access to the Big Ten Network under an agreement reached with Comcast, the network said Wednesday. Under the deal -- finalized before Maryland enters the Big Ten conference next Tuesday -- Comcast cable subscribers in the principal markets for Maryland and Rutgers will be able to access the network without subscribing to a separate sports tier.   The network is already available to most local Maryland fans, who often pay a fee added to their cable operators' bills for extra sports programming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
The heart of Al Jazeera America's prime-time lineup is an attractive one if you are looking for news, context and a fresh visual perspective on U.S. and world events. At least that's the way it looked premiere night Tuesday as the Qatar-based channel unveiled a solidly-reported and skillfully packaged hour of news at 8 p.m. followed by “America Tonight,” its flagship broadcast of in-depth, magazine-style pieces. And yet, even as this promising addition to the American TV news landscape arrived, AT&T announced Tuesday that it would not carry the channel on its U-verse pay-TV service with an estimated 5 million viewers.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | May 9, 2007
LAS VEGAS -- The next generation of Internet cable modems will let users download a full set of encyclopedias in a few minutes, transfer 75 songs or thousands of photos in a few seconds, or download TV shows and movies in a fraction of the time it takes today. Brian L. Roberts, Comcast Corp.'s chairman and chief executive, predicted yesterday that the new devices will once again revolutionize the television and technology businesses. In the first public demonstration of "wideband" cable modems, Roberts' prototype hit data transfer rates of about 150 megabits per second.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | January 10, 2007
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. warned thousands of cable customers in the Midwest and South yesterday that it expects to keep blocking network affiliates such as Fox and ABC for a "long time" because of a dispute over how much local programming is worth. Hunt Valley-based Sinclair yanked 22 stations from cable systems in 13 states over the weekend after negotiations failed with a New York-based company on a price to carry the local network affiliates.
NEWS
By Daniel Lyons | June 10, 2014
The cable company is one entity everyone likes to hate. Perhaps this knee-jerk animosity is to blame for the rush to condemn Comcast's proposed $44 billion merger with Time Warner Cable. Critics complain that combining the nation's two largest cable companies would create a "behemoth" with 30 million customers, nearly one-third the cable/satellite market. But calling this a "cable deal" misunderstands the dynamic nature of the modern video marketplace. America is in the midst of an entertainment revolution, giving consumers more choices than ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
The heart of Al Jazeera America's prime-time lineup is an attractive one if you are looking for news, context and a fresh visual perspective on U.S. and world events. At least that's the way it looked premiere night Tuesday as the Qatar-based channel unveiled a solidly-reported and skillfully packaged hour of news at 8 p.m. followed by “America Tonight,” its flagship broadcast of in-depth, magazine-style pieces. And yet, even as this promising addition to the American TV news landscape arrived, AT&T announced Tuesday that it would not carry the channel on its U-verse pay-TV service with an estimated 5 million viewers.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. said Wednesday it has settled a contract dispute with Time Warner Cable Inc., reaching a multiyear agreement that allows the cable provider to carry signals for 28 Sinclair television stations. That means Time Warner customers in 17 markets from Portland, Maine, to Pensacola, Fla., will have access to network TV stations such as Fox, NBC, CBS and ABC affiliates that might otherwise have gone dark. Time Warner, the second-largest cable operator in the United States, serves customers in 28 states, mainly in New York, the Carolinas, Ohio, Texas and Southern California.
BUSINESS
By Cox News Service | May 9, 2007
LAS VEGAS -- The next generation of Internet cable modems will let users download a full set of encyclopedias in a few minutes, transfer 75 songs or thousands of photos in a few seconds, or download TV shows and movies in a fraction of the time it takes today. Brian L. Roberts, Comcast Corp.'s chairman and chief executive, predicted yesterday that the new devices will once again revolutionize the television and technology businesses. In the first public demonstration of "wideband" cable modems, Roberts' prototype hit data transfer rates of about 150 megabits per second.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | January 10, 2007
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. warned thousands of cable customers in the Midwest and South yesterday that it expects to keep blocking network affiliates such as Fox and ABC for a "long time" because of a dispute over how much local programming is worth. Hunt Valley-based Sinclair yanked 22 stations from cable systems in 13 states over the weekend after negotiations failed with a New York-based company on a price to carry the local network affiliates.
NEWS
By RICHARD J. DALTON JR. and RICHARD J. DALTON JR.,NEWSDAY | December 13, 2005
Bowing to government pressure, cable companies serving the majority of U.S. subscribers plan to offer family-oriented packages, industry executives said yesterday. Time Warner Cable, Comcast and several other cable networks accounting for 56 percent of subscribers will offer the option, said Paul Rodriguez, spokesman for the National Cable and Telecommunications Association. The president and chief executive of the trade group, Kyle McSlarrow, discussed family programming yesterday with the Senate Commerce Committee at a meeting on decency in programming.
NEWS
By Daniel Lyons | June 10, 2014
The cable company is one entity everyone likes to hate. Perhaps this knee-jerk animosity is to blame for the rush to condemn Comcast's proposed $44 billion merger with Time Warner Cable. Critics complain that combining the nation's two largest cable companies would create a "behemoth" with 30 million customers, nearly one-third the cable/satellite market. But calling this a "cable deal" misunderstands the dynamic nature of the modern video marketplace. America is in the midst of an entertainment revolution, giving consumers more choices than ever.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 26, 2014
Marathon Tatyana McFadden to defend crown in Chicago Reigning women's wheelchair champion Tatyana McFadden (Atholton) will defend her title in the Oct. 12 Chicago Marathon, race officials announced. McFadden, 25, became last year the first wheelchair racer to sweep all four major marathons - Boston, London, Chicago and New York. She tried cross-country skiing after last season and won a silver medal at the Sochi Paralympics. Terps Comcast to open cable access for UM games Many Maryland fans will have easier access to the Big Ten Network under an agreement reached with Comcast, the network said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 29, 2004
Cable companies, which have been weighed down for years by heavy investments and sagging subscriber growth, are starting to turn the corner. Comcast Corp. said yesterday that it earned $262 million in the second quarter, after losing $22 million in the quarter last year, thanks to an increase in the number of customers signing up for high-speed Internet and digital video services. Comcast said it earned 12 cents a share, compared with a net loss of $22 million, or a penny a share, in the second quarter last year.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 15, 2004
NEW YORK - Comcast Corp. and other cable operators won support yesterday from Republican and Democratic lawmakers who criticized an idea to let consumers buy channels individually rather than in packages. "We have a marketplace that is working," Rep. Fred Upton, the Michigan Republican who heads the House telecommunications subcommittee, said at a hearing. "The government must resist the urge to re-regulate and tinker with this marketplace." No bill has been introduced to require so-called a la carte service, which would dismantle the current system in which cable operators select the channels viewers get in packages.
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