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July 13, 1992
LUXEMBOURG -- The Tour de France keeps moving around, jumping from one country to another. However, the contenders remain the same.After the eighth stage finished at Koblenz, Germany, the cycling race made a quick jump to Luxembourg last night for today's time trial as all the contenders jockeyed for position.Three-time champion Greg LeMond, 1991 winner Miguel Indurain and world champion Gianni Bugno kept one eye on the route and one on each other during yesterday's eighth stage, and more of the same was expected in today's 41-mile time trial.
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SPORTS
By TRACY WILKINSON | July 6, 2006
ROME -- These are bittersweet days for Italian soccer fans. Into the wee hours of yesterday, tens of thousands of Italians coursed through their city streets in raucous celebration of Italy's Tuesday victory over Germany, a win that put the blue-shirted national team into the World Cup final. Later yesterday, under the hot summer-day glare, a massive match-fixing trial in an improvised courtroom in the belly of Rome's Olympic Stadium heard another round of testimony, part of a scandal so unseemly that one newspaper called it "football's funeral."
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SPORTS
By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 26, 2003
SAINT-MAIXENT-L'ECOLE, France - Lance Armstrong has pushed all of his poker chips into the pot now, betting on a hand that has paid handsomely in the past. "I've never lost a final time trial in the Tour de France, and I don't plan on starting this year," he said earlier this week, looking ahead to today's beat-the-clock Stage 19 on a 30.4-mile course starting in the Atlantic coastal town of Pornic and heading inland to the regional capital of Nantes. But this has been a precedent-setting Tour for Armstrong, and not always in a positive sense.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 24, 2005
SAINT-ETIENNE, France - The sky was deep blue, smiling on Lance Armstrong. His yellow jersey glistened with hope in sharp contrast to his pitch-black Trek bike, the instrument by which Armstrong was about to put his final emphatic mark on the 2005 Tour de France. Riding in his last individual time trial at his last professional race, Armstrong, the 33-year-old cancer survivor and record-setting winner of six straight Tours, demolished the field yesterday. Finishing in 1 hour, 11 minutes, 46 seconds at an average speed of 28.8 mph, Armstrong won the 34.5-mile race against the clock and all but clinched his seventh straight victory.
SPORTS
By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 18, 2003
TOULOUSE, France - Time for Lance Armstrong to turn up the heat in his quest for a fifth straight Tour de France, except that it's hard to imagine how much hotter things could get. The next four days could decide the race, starting with today's 29.2-mile individual time trial that ends in a former coal mine converted into a space theme park. Then the riders rocket into the Pyrenees. It appears there will be no relief from the searing, relentless conditions that have prevailed for weeks in one of Europe's worst heat waves in decades.
SPORTS
By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2003
CARMAUX, France - On the parched roads of southern France, Lance Armstrong was as thirsty as he has ever been. Jan Ullrich, apparently, hasn't been this hungry in a long time. Ullrich torched the field in the Tour de France's first long individual time trial yesterday, winning the 29.2-mile stage by 1 minute, 36 seconds over Armstrong and setting up the tightest and potentially most interesting tour finish since the Texan's reign began. Armstrong's overall lead actually grew from 21 to 34 seconds as Ullrich, more than two minutes behind going into yesterday's race, had to vault several riders to get into second place.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2004
L'ALPE D'HUEZ, France - The Tour de France belongs to Lance Armstrong. Again. Barring an extraordinary collapse, the 32-year-old Texan, who recovered from cancer to find a new focus and commitment to his sport, will win cycling's most celebrated and grueling road race for a record sixth consecutive time. There are four stages to go, so officially Armstrong will have to wait until Sunday to ride down the Champs Elysees, drinking champagne and savoring the history he has made. But, amid a caldron of emotion, he all but won the race yesterday in the 16th stage during a 9.63-mile time trial up the L'Alpe d'Huez, the Tour's most famous mountain.
SPORTS
June 6, 1996
Routine nixed: Sports minister Guy Drut ordered France's Olympic synchronized swimming team to drop any references to the Holocaust in its controversial routine. Set to music from the movie "Schindler's List," the routine re-enacted the arrival of Jewish women in the death camps, the selection by Nazi doctors and their final march to the gas chambers.Hartwell gains spot: Erin Hartwell won the 1,000-meter time trial, becoming the first person to clinch a spot on the Olympic cycling team. Hartwell, who won a bronze medalist in 1992, finished the time trial in 1: 04.48, 1.43 seconds ahead of Jonas Carney of Boulder, Colo.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 20, 2004
NIMES, France - One by one they will take off, 160 riders. Ahead of them will be 9.6 miles of continual climbing through 21 hairpin turns. There will be close to a million people lining the road, which will have been painted bright orange in honor of the Dutch or red, black and yellow, the colors of the German flag, or blue, white and red for the French. The fans will be behind barriers for the last two miles, so until then, people will be darting onto the road to wave a flag in a cyclist's face, snap a picture or yell in a rider's ears.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 12, 1999
METZ, France -- Lance Armstrong proved yesterday that he can ride a long way with the same power and purpose that he can ride a short distance, winning the Tour de France's first extended time trial as easily as he won the brief prologue and taking a giant step toward overall victory.Although there are two weeks left in the race and his credentials for the battle in the Alps and Pyrenees are still to be proved, Armstrong pulled on the overall leader's yellow jersey with a lead of more than two minutes over the field and four minutes over those riders considered to be his main rivals.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 5, 2005
TOURS, France - It was a moment of graciousness from Lance Armstrong to a possible successor. In the middle of the peloton, while everybody was riding leisurely, at about 30 mph or so, Armstrong sneaked up on the side of David Zabriskie, leaned over and started talking, cyclist to cyclist, two guys riding in the countryside, whizzing by a 900-year-old chateau. Zabriskie, a 26-year-old from Salt Lake City who rides for a Danish organization, Team CSC, kept possession of the yellow jersey, the coveted shirt owned by the overall leader at the Tour de France.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 2005
LES ESSARTS, France - Done with the opening festivities and the restless, single-file, first-day time trial, the Tour de France settled into the soft rhythm of racing in the flats yesterday. Six-time defending champion Lance Armstrong stayed safe in the cocoon of his Discovery Channel team protectors, finishing in 63rd place in the 112.5-mile run from Challans and in second place overall. Fellow American Dave Zabriskie, the surprise winner of Saturday's time trial, held the leader's yellow jersey for at least one more day. His advantage stayed at two seconds over Armstrong.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 3, 2005
NOIRMOUTIER-EN-L'ILE, France - Lance Armstrong pedaled with such ferocity that his right foot slipped off the pedal before he'd barely pushed himself out of the starting gate. Armstrong muttered something, hunched his shoulders and slammed ahead, moving with a single purpose. To send a message. Aiming to win an unprecedented seventh straight Tour de France in this retirement race, Armstrong finished two seconds behind the unlikely stage winner, David Zabriskie, in yesterday's 11.8-mile first-stage time trial at the Tour de France.
SPORTS
By Bonnie DeSimone and Bonnie DeSimone,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 25, 2004
BESANCON, France - Lance Armstrong added an exclamation point to what will almost certainly be his history-making sixth Tour de France victory with a triumph yesterday in the race's second individual time trial. The Stage 19 win was Armstrong's career-high fifth in the 2004 race and marked the first time he has swept both time trials since 2001. The next-best rider was Germany's Jan Ullrich, who was 61 seconds slower. As has been the case for five straight years, all Armstrong needs to do is stay in the saddle today during the flat and largely ceremonial final run into Paris to do what no rider has done before in the 101-year history of the race.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2004
L'ALPE D'HUEZ, France - The Tour de France belongs to Lance Armstrong. Again. Barring an extraordinary collapse, the 32-year-old Texan, who recovered from cancer to find a new focus and commitment to his sport, will win cycling's most celebrated and grueling road race for a record sixth consecutive time. There are four stages to go, so officially Armstrong will have to wait until Sunday to ride down the Champs Elysees, drinking champagne and savoring the history he has made. But, amid a caldron of emotion, he all but won the race yesterday in the 16th stage during a 9.63-mile time trial up the L'Alpe d'Huez, the Tour's most famous mountain.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 20, 2004
NIMES, France - One by one they will take off, 160 riders. Ahead of them will be 9.6 miles of continual climbing through 21 hairpin turns. There will be close to a million people lining the road, which will have been painted bright orange in honor of the Dutch or red, black and yellow, the colors of the German flag, or blue, white and red for the French. The fans will be behind barriers for the last two miles, so until then, people will be darting onto the road to wave a flag in a cyclist's face, snap a picture or yell in a rider's ears.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 2005
LES ESSARTS, France - Done with the opening festivities and the restless, single-file, first-day time trial, the Tour de France settled into the soft rhythm of racing in the flats yesterday. Six-time defending champion Lance Armstrong stayed safe in the cocoon of his Discovery Channel team protectors, finishing in 63rd place in the 112.5-mile run from Challans and in second place overall. Fellow American Dave Zabriskie, the surprise winner of Saturday's time trial, held the leader's yellow jersey for at least one more day. His advantage stayed at two seconds over Armstrong.
SPORTS
July 14, 1991
LeMond regains Tour de France leadThree-time Tour de France winner Greg LeMond regained the overall lead with a strong showing yesterday in the eighth stage, a 45-mile individual time trial from Argentan to Alencon. LeMond finished second in the trial, eight seconds behind Spain's Miguel Indurain, but that was good enough to overtake Erik Breukink of the Netherlands in the overall standings.Breukink, who won two of the three time trials in last year's race, led LeMond by 26 seconds at the last checkpoint.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 10, 2004
NEW YORK - It is just one of the thousands of soft-focus, idealized images that over the years have presented the world of Martha Stewart as Martha Stewart would have you see it: the weedless Giverny-esque gardens, the sun-lighted kitchen of polished pots and nary a stray crumb, the lavish parties with gemlike canapes and sparkling crystal. This particular picture, bathed in a warm glow suggesting candles or a crackling log fire just out of camera range, shows a young blond woman enveloped by the arms of a dark-haired man. It appears in Martha Stewart's Christmas, a 1989 book in which the author lays her claim to the holiday, along with this caption: "In the library, beneath a collection of Copeland's china by Spode, my daughter, Alexis, and her boyfriend, Sam Waksal, embrace in what they thought was a private moment."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
It was a fire of catastrophic proportions. In about 30 hours, 140 acres of downtown Baltimore burned, the fire taking down 1,526 buildings and 2,500 businesses in its fury. The Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 was disastrous. But Baltimore would rebound. And within three years, Baltimore's business district would be rebuilt and reborn. It would, in fact, be better than before. Saturday marks the 100th anniversary of the historic Feb. 7, 1904, blaze that claimed 140 city blocks but somehow took only five lives.
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