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December 27, 2012
If you received some money for a holiday gift (or even if you didn't), you might want to use it to make the (short) trip to the Medieval Times dinner and tournament at Arundel Mills Mall. This nine-year-old theatrical experience (29 years in Kissimmee, Florida) will whisk you back to the days of knights in shining armor defending their distressed damsels and generally settling their differences in good-natured competitions and even outright battles. All of this takes place in an arena setting with a thick, sandy floor.
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NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | November 21, 2013
Venus Theatre's latest production, the premiere of "731 Degraw-street, Brooklyn or Emily Dickinson's Sister," starts with a dramatic ending and goes backward and forward in time, opening with gunshots and a young man's dead body sprawled on the stage. The opening left the theater tensely silent as the audience seemed to lean toward the stage in anticipation of where the story would go. They had to wait, a bit long at times, as the plot progressed while four actors changed into different costumes behind stage, and those playing ensemble roles changed the staging to music with a funky beat.
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NEWS
March 11, 2007
Good morning. Do you know what time it is? Maybe later than you think - but only by an hour. And right on schedule to witness the meager impact of the only cost-saving and conservation measure of the Energy Policy Act of 2005: an extra month of daylight-saving time, beginning today when the nation springs forward three weeks earlier than usual. The energy savings from briefly postponing the dusk, when lights must be switched on, is not expected to be much; so said Canadians when most of their provinces decided to adopt the U.S. policy primarily to simplify Northern Hemisphere transactions.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The Colonial Players troupe is opening its 65th season with an invitation for audiences to embark on an adventure of new voices and broad horizons — namely a time travel adventure written by prolific British master of farce, Alan Ayckbourn. "Communicating Doors" is a daring departure from Ayckbourn's comedy, "Taking Steps," which closed Colonial Players' previous season. The show asks us to suspend disbelief — or at least stretch it to accept what may be possible through time travel.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Annapolis Shakespeare Company founder and artistic director Sally Boyett-D'Angelo is having a busy summer. She's presenting classic theater outdoors with weekly productions of Moliere's 17th-century comedy "Tartuffe" on Tuesdays at the Reynolds Tavern courtyard in downtown Annapolis. At the same time, she's rehearsing Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing," which opens of the company's third season this Friday at Bowie Playhouse. A recent rehearsal at the troupe's Chinquapin Round Road studio showed why, under Boyett-D'Angelo's guidance, "Much Ado" is both engaging and comic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 15, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National • Really, Canada? Smoking is the least of your Charlie Sheen worries: Canada warns Sheen n ot to smoke on stag e. (CBC News)  • Shocker. It's all about ratings? Trump might announce presidential intentions on "The Apprentice. " (Yahoo News)
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | April 2, 1994
Hello, have you seen 'Sankofa' yet?'' I was calling my friend, a woman of powerful religious convictions, about Ethiopian film director Haile Gerima's moving remembrance of the African slave trade. The film has been playing to packed houses in Baltimore for several weeks now.''What about it?'' my friend replied. ''Is it any good?''''It's terrific,'' I said. ''And it has set me to thinking about our history in a whole new way. Let me run an idea past you, OK?''''You know I can't stop you.''''Just listen,'' I said.
NEWS
By Jeff Danziger and By Jeff Danziger,Special to The Sun | February 19, 1995
This book is a sort of misty science fiction thing about time travel from modern New York City to the same city of the previous century. The time travel itself, which in most books involves capsules or rocket ships or special beam-me-up rays invented for the purpose, is here accomplished by never quite describing it at all."From Time to Time" is a sequel to Mr. Finney's 1970 book, " Time and Again," just re-issued, a book that has sold a quarter of a million copies and has arrived at the status of cult classic by the word-of-mouth recommendation of people who are fairly easy to please.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 29, 2004
Primer Rated PG-13 (brief language); *** Primer is way too intricate for its own good, bordering on being incomprehensible - it's one of those films that you need to see three or four times to understand fully, which is asking a lot at $8 a pop for theater tickets. But the movie is so audacious in its intent, and it wears its impenetrability so proudly, that it might just be worth it. At its core, yet another treatise on the inherent problems and conundrums presented by the idea of time travel - what happens, for instance, if you meet yourself?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 24, 2006
Note to makers of thrillers and love stories: Leave time travel to sci-fi experts, comedians and the occasional existentialist. A sci-fi comedy like Back to the Future moves quickly and humorously enough to make us pleasurably suspend our disbelief, and a quasi-Buddhist frolic like Groundhog Day wittily forces time to repeat itself and then stand still. But as a gimmick in a self-serious genre movie, time travel almost never works. The magic time-portal mailbox (yes, you read that right)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
Annapolis Shakespeare Company founder and artistic director Sally Boyett-D'Angelo is having a busy summer. She's presenting classic theater outdoors with weekly productions of Moliere's 17th-century comedy "Tartuffe" on Tuesdays at the Reynolds Tavern courtyard in downtown Annapolis. At the same time, she's rehearsing Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing," which opens of the company's third season this Friday at Bowie Playhouse. A recent rehearsal at the troupe's Chinquapin Round Road studio showed why, under Boyett-D'Angelo's guidance, "Much Ado" is both engaging and comic.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2013
As we learned last week, members of the Ravens' 2000 championship squad are rooting for the 2012 team, but if the modern-day Ravens could go back in time and play them, the 2000 team is confident it would win. "If you asked me to pick a team to win, well, of course the 2000 Ravens ," guard Mike Flynn told our Ed Lee. Ray Lewis, the only man still standing from the Super Bowl XXXV team, believes the teams are similar. "When you think about this team and the 2000 [Super Bowl team]
EXPLORE
December 27, 2012
If you received some money for a holiday gift (or even if you didn't), you might want to use it to make the (short) trip to the Medieval Times dinner and tournament at Arundel Mills Mall. This nine-year-old theatrical experience (29 years in Kissimmee, Florida) will whisk you back to the days of knights in shining armor defending their distressed damsels and generally settling their differences in good-natured competitions and even outright battles. All of this takes place in an arena setting with a thick, sandy floor.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
It was evident from watching Annapolis Shakespeare Company's director and cast members rehearse Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" that this young company is making astonishing strides - not small steps, but artful leaps. It was also clear that the show's opening would be a lively comic treat. Last year, I reported on ASC's progress from a small workshop taught by Sally Boyett-D'Angelo in summer 2009 into a thriving young company that had already become a full member of the county's established nonprofit performing-arts community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rene Rodriguez, McClatchy-Tribune | November 10, 2011
"The past is obdurate. It doesn't want to change. " The past is also a dangerous, fickle place - and woe to anyone who dares alter it. That's the mantra coursing through "11/22/63. " Stephen   King's  mammoth, generous and thrilling novel is about a man who travels back in time to prevent the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. He is Jake Epping, a divorced, 35-year-old high school English teacher from Lisbon, Maine, who discovers a time-travel portal in the pantry of a neighborhood diner.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 8, 2011
Props to Orioles editor Steve Gould for passing along this random video of Orioles first-round pick Dylan Bundy pounding on a punching bag for a couple of minutes when he was 14. After watching this video six or seven times, there are a couple of things worth noting. First, with his monster guns, 14-year-old Dylan Bundy would most definitely win an arm wrestling match with present-day Zach Britton, Brian Matusz or any other current Orioles starting pitcher (if only we had time travel to find this out for sure)
NEWS
By K. C. Cole and K. C. Cole,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 21, 1998
PASADENA, Calif. -- Carl Sagan had a problem. In 1983, the author and astronomer was searching for a rapid interstellar transport system that could whiz the heroine of his science fiction saga, "Contact," billions of miles to the star Vega to meet the newly discovered alien and then return her safely home the next day.He toyed with the extraordinary idea of sending Ellie Arroway down a black hole. But he worried: Would the physics be right?Sagan, who died two years ago, had a friend in Kip Thorne, the California Institute of Technology physicist who specializes in space and time warps.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Dorsey and By Gary Dorsey,Sun Staff | June 24, 2001
"Time Travel in Einstein's Universe: The Physical Possibilities of Travel Through Time," by J. Richard Gott. Houghton Mifflin. 291 pages. $25. Richard Gott must be the only Princeton astrophysicist to make both the journal Nature and the Proceedings of the Vulcan Science Academy. Fantasy, astronomy and rare equations dance like sugar plums under his hand. Thankfully, Gott is a fine writer. His reading audience learns quickly that the most obtuse concepts can be personable companions. With Gott as guide, almost anyone can join Einstein as a fellow traveler down the astonishing road of time travel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | April 15, 2011
On weekday mornings, I'll post the most controversial, shocking and (of course) ridiculous stories for your reading pleasure. That way, when you walk into work, you'll be the master of witty conversation. National • Really, Canada? Smoking is the least of your Charlie Sheen worries: Canada warns Sheen n ot to smoke on stag e. (CBC News)  • Shocker. It's all about ratings? Trump might announce presidential intentions on "The Apprentice. " (Yahoo News)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
"Let us trek." With that simple suggestion, three Victorian women plunge into a journey that will yield far more than they ever bargained for in Eric Overmyer's comic fantasy, "On the Verge, or The Geography of Yearning." Venturing from a point "somewhere east of Australia and west of Peru" into the great terra incognita, the trio of explorers are heavily armed with umbrellas, machetes and linguistic darts, taking the willing fellow-traveler along on what amounts to a head trip of remarkable breadth.
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