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SPORTS
September 21, 2005
"I don't read the papers. I haven't got the time to read them. I don't even have an e-mail address. I've just tried to put myself in a position to just focus on what I think is right and wrong and not get involved in what the public thinks." Joe Paterno Penn State football coach, on dealing with criticism as his teams have struggled "They married for money, and they also married for looks and for brains." Chris Fowler Of ESPN, on Boston College's move from the Big East to the Atlantic Coast Conference
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NEWS
By Liz Atwood | August 3, 2008
With her job as a Baltimore District Court judge and her duties as Maryland's first lady and mother of four, Katie O'Malley says it's a challenge to find time to read. "There are so many [books] and so little time," she sighs. Usually, she squeezes her reading in while riding in the car. Her tastes are diverse, but lately she's been reading books that have a message of hope in face of adversity. "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee "As most kids, I had to read it in high school. ... The book had so much meaning for me because the moral hero of the book, Atticus Finch, reminded me of my father, Joe Curran."
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FEATURES
April 28, 1999
Bedtime is not the only time to read with a child. Have books handy at home, and pack some with you when you leave. Books can be helpful in these situations:* Preparing for new experiences* Relieving stress* Comforting fears* Offering reassurance* Getting silly* During an illness* During time-outs* On the bus* In the car: Yes, stories on tape are a great way to share tales. A road trip also can be a time for passengers to read aloud to drivers. -- Valerie & Walter's Best Books for Children by Valerie V. Lewis and Walter M. Mayes
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 12, 2008
After a lengthy career as an educator, Calvin W. Burnett can now read all the books he's always wanted to. He's retired and living in Westminster. The grass does not grow around his feet. "I've now got the time to work around the house and sort out a lifetime of memorabilia," he said. "I've had a chance to transition from the world of government and administration to a real home life." Burnett's last job was as Maryland's secretary of higher education. From 1970 to 2003, he was president of what is now Coppin State University.
FEATURES
September 20, 1998
Bedtime is not the only time to read with a child. Have books handy at home, and pack some with you when you leave. Books can be helpful in the following situations:* Preparing for new experiences* Relieving stress* Reducing fears* Offering reassurance* Getting silly* During an illness* During time-outs* On the bus* In the car: Yes, stories on tape are a great way to share tales. A road trip also can be a time for passengers to read aloud to drivers.- From "Valerie & Walter's Best Books for Children" by Valerie V. Lewis and Walter M. MayesPub Date: 9/20/98
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | March 7, 2008
Valerie Gross is the first to acknowledge that she spends some of her free time working, but she finds time to read. A short list of books the library director would recommend includes: The Speed of Dark, Elizabeth Moon. A Thousand Splendid Suns, Khaled Hosseini. Words that Work: It's Not What You Say, It's What People Hear, Frank Luntz. The Pursuit of Alice Thrift, Elinor Lipman. My Sister's Keeper, Jodi Picoult. "I have read Words that Work at least 10 times and would read anything by Lipman or Picoult," said Gross.
NEWS
February 26, 1996
A GOOD BOOK'S value is too often lost on modern society. Between E-mails, rush hour traffic, car pools, working lunches and hurried phone calls, many of us have to steal time just to read the paper much less plunge into a book. Who would take the time to read Jane Austen's "Sense and Sensibility" when you can go to the movie?The last time many adults were encouraged to sit down and focus on good literature was in school, when reading was more a chore than a conscious choice.Thus, a Howard County Library reading and discussion program designed for adults who have little time to read -- is anyone excluded?
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | March 29, 1992
Havre de Grace. -- Modeern life, like military life, tends to be a hurry-up-and-wait affair, alternating frantic activity with periods of enforced inaction. This can be frustrating, but it can also be useful.Recently, for entirely commonplace reasons and in company with several other people, I've been required to spend a considerable amount of time sitting and waiting. Though not exactly pleasant, this had value, for it provided an unusual opportunity to do some steady reading. Almost everyone in the group, which included people of many different backgrounds, took advantage of that.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | July 12, 2008
After a lengthy career as an educator, Calvin W. Burnett can now read all the books he's always wanted to. He's retired and living in Westminster. The grass does not grow around his feet. "I've now got the time to work around the house and sort out a lifetime of memorabilia," he said. "I've had a chance to transition from the world of government and administration to a real home life." Burnett's last job was as Maryland's secretary of higher education. From 1970 to 2003, he was president of what is now Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood | August 3, 2008
With her job as a Baltimore District Court judge and her duties as Maryland's first lady and mother of four, Katie O'Malley says it's a challenge to find time to read. "There are so many [books] and so little time," she sighs. Usually, she squeezes her reading in while riding in the car. Her tastes are diverse, but lately she's been reading books that have a message of hope in face of adversity. "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee "As most kids, I had to read it in high school. ... The book had so much meaning for me because the moral hero of the book, Atticus Finch, reminded me of my father, Joe Curran."
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | March 7, 2008
Valerie Gross is the first to acknowledge that she spends some of her free time working, but she finds time to read. A short list of books the library director would recommend includes: The Speed of Dark, Elizabeth Moon. A Thousand Splendid Suns, Khaled Hosseini. Words that Work: It's Not What You Say, It's What People Hear, Frank Luntz. The Pursuit of Alice Thrift, Elinor Lipman. My Sister's Keeper, Jodi Picoult. "I have read Words that Work at least 10 times and would read anything by Lipman or Picoult," said Gross.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | October 22, 2006
The publisher and editors at The Sun spend a lot of time these days thinking about readers - what can be done to keep them and what can be done to bring in new ones. Newspaper executives are worried because circulation figures have declined. When former subscribers are asked why they left, the majority say they are simply too busy to read. With that disconcerting situation in mind, The Sun recently launched an array of new features designed to connect with readers in personal ways - regular stories about nutrition, consumer issues, commuting, neighborhood problems and getting older.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 2006
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Thousands of schools across the nation are responding to the reading and math testing requirements laid out in No Child Left Behind, President Bush's signature education law, by reducing class time spent on other subjects and, for some low-proficiency students, eliminating it. Schools from Vermont to California are increasing -- in some cases tripling -- the class time that low-proficiency students spend on reading and math, mainly...
SPORTS
September 21, 2005
"I don't read the papers. I haven't got the time to read them. I don't even have an e-mail address. I've just tried to put myself in a position to just focus on what I think is right and wrong and not get involved in what the public thinks." Joe Paterno Penn State football coach, on dealing with criticism as his teams have struggled "They married for money, and they also married for looks and for brains." Chris Fowler Of ESPN, on Boston College's move from the Big East to the Atlantic Coast Conference
NEWS
By Christina Temes and Christina Temes,Baltimoresun.com Staff | August 18, 2005
If you want to make the most out of your three months of freedom and live it up before summer vacations become a thing of the past, here are some tips for survival on the homefront. 1. Negotiate. Yes, your parents will probably want to set some kind of rules while you're under their roof, but give 'em a bit of credit -- they will probably acknowledge that you're at least on the road to adulthood. So put this newfound status to work and try to compromise on matters such as curfews instead of whining about their Draconian rules.
NEWS
January 29, 2004
An interview with Kathy McDowell, founding member of Good Friends, Good Books book club. What are you reading? The Miracle at St. Anna by James McBride. It's about the Negro 92nd Division in Italy in World War II. Amidst prejudice, they're trying to help this town come out from under Nazi occupation. It's historical fiction. How did you choose this book? We read another of his books, The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother. Whenever we like an author, we try and read more of his or her books.
NEWS
January 29, 2004
An interview with Kathy McDowell, founding member of Good Friends, Good Books book club. What are you reading? The Miracle at St. Anna by James McBride. It's about the Negro 92nd Division in Italy in World War II. Amidst prejudice, they're trying to help this town come out from under Nazi occupation. It's historical fiction. How did you choose this book? We read another of his books, The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother. Whenever we like an author, we try and read more of his or her books.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | November 25, 1997
AS YOU READ this, I am in line at the grocery store with a shopping cart full of the ingredients for side dishes I have not made in a year.It is a long, long line of women pushing shopping carts full of ingredients for side dishes they have not made in a year.So, where there should be a column, there is nothing but ...True Facts.Publishers say that women are the buyers of 70 percent to 80 percent of fiction titles. That is because they stubbornly cling to the belief that they will have time to read them some day.Voice mail was invented because husbands and teen-agers can't remember to deliver messages, even after they write them down.
NEWS
June 5, 2003
An interview with Lisa Bankman, co-founder with her daughter, Judy Bankman, of the Book Buddies Book Club. Is this a mother-daughter book club? Yes, the mothers are always invited, but they're not required to come. How did you start? My daughter and I had talked about it since she was in the sixth grade and by the time she was in eighth grade, we sent out invitations to a group of close friends and to the moms. We had our first meeting and took off from there. That was in the beginning of 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Tucker and By Ken Tucker,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
Summertime book reviews frequently take up the notion of escapism, of the "beach read," and what's usually recommended is a roundup of some thick yet short-chaptered thrillers or a few lightweight comic novels. But why not toss poetry into this sun-baked category? There are always new collections of poems strong enough in literary quality yet accessible to any open-minded reader that would make for perfect hot-day entertainment as well as (this is an extra added bonus, the verse equivalent of relish on your hot dog)
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