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By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | May 9, 1992
At long last it's time to plant tomatoes, now that the weather statistics say it probably won't snow or freeze again until fall.If you're among those who ran out during a hot day in April to buy the first plant in the garden center, then wondered why it died in your garden, try again now that the weather is reliably warm. Tomatoes are tropical plants and will grow for us only when we can fool them into thinking they're back home.When you're buying plants, look for healthy-looking ones with thick stems rather than tall spindly stems.
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By NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON and NANCY TAYLOR ROBSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2006
It's slightly more complicated than your fourth-grade science project, but a whole lot more rewarding: starting your own garden plants from seed indoors. "It's a lot of fun," says veteran gardener Tina Beneman of Owings Mills. "There's nothing more exciting than seeing the seeds sprout, especially when everything outside is dormant and gray." For years, Beneman has been starting seeds for everything from vegetables to annuals and perennials. One reason is cost. "I love abundance, but the cost of a packet of seeds versus what you'd pay to buy the plants is incredible."
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By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1998
Fall is the perfect season for the beginner gardener to get started. It's the traditional time to plant spring-blooming bulbs, which not only are very forgiving and easy to grow, but also provide welcome color during the early part of the year.Bulbs are also reassuringly reliable, as most come back every year. This makes them the natural backbone of most spring gardens.As an added plus, most bulbs are reasonably priced, except a few of the more exotic ones. Also, if you don't like the effect you produce the first spring, bulbs are easy to dig up and move about, or even pull out and discard if, say, the color combination turns out not to be what you had in mind.
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By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | September 14, 2003
The tree frogs are in full chorus, singing summer's end. Gardens are winding down. Leaves are beginning to flutter along the sidewalks. It's fall, which means harvest, cleanup and planting. Planting? Yup. For reasons both human and botanical, fall is the time to plant. On the human side, fall has far fewer time-critical garden chores than spring. It's more leisurely. Also, planting toward the end of the season instead of at the beginning helps curtail the temptation to cram in everything but the kitchen sink.
NEWS
By Melanie Waddell and Melanie Waddell,Contributing writer | September 15, 1991
You'd have to love what you do to stick with the same job for 52 years, right?True, says William Rothwell, owner of the Rothwell Nursery in Perryman. And the reasons he's stuck with the nursery businessfor that long are simple: He likes planting almost any type of tree or shrub and watching it bloom and grow.While it's no surprise his favorite season is spring, for it is during those months that he sees best the fruits of his labor, fall isa fine time for planting, he says.Rothwell says the fall is the best time for adding trees or shrubs to a landscape, for example.
FEATURES
By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | April 11, 1992
You begin to wonder if nature has a perverse sense of humor when the first perfect day for digging and planting coincides with opening day at the new stadium.If you weren't one of those multitudes who skipped the game to stay home and dig in the garden, you'll have more chances now. The beginning of daylight-saving time last Sunday now gives us a little bit of after-work gardening time in the evenings.As the weather finally warms, the chores multiply exponentially:* More crops can be planted in the vegetable garden.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | September 6, 1992
Professional garden folk, from horticulturists to seed sellers to plant purveyors, are getting serious about making gardening more user-friendly; a lack of appropriate information and frustration over plant failure keep many a plot in grass -- or concrete. Sturdier, hardier plants, more drought tolerance, better fruit setting and more continuous blooms are among characteristics being bred into plants today.Richard Watson, of Exterior Design of Glen Arm has some tips for gardeners just getting started:*By all means, read all the books you can find.
NEWS
By Miriam Mahowald and Miriam Mahowald,Contributing writer | October 14, 1990
Fall has arrived. The department stores have stacked their gardening tools, sprinklers, mowers, sweepers and fertilizers into a corner and marked them for clearance. Garden centers announce that it's time to plant and mulch.It's true that fall is a good time to plant spring flowering bulbs, perennials, and balled and burlapped trees and shrubs. It is time to fertilize your lawn and patch up small areas of the turf with sod. It is time to keep the fallen leaves raked so they won't smother the grass.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | September 14, 2003
The tree frogs are in full chorus, singing summer's end. Gardens are winding down. Leaves are beginning to flutter along the sidewalks. It's fall, which means harvest, cleanup and planting. Planting? Yup. For reasons both human and botanical, fall is the time to plant. On the human side, fall has far fewer time-critical garden chores than spring. It's more leisurely. Also, planting toward the end of the season instead of at the beginning helps curtail the temptation to cram in everything but the kitchen sink.
FEATURES
October 20, 1996
When and how should I plant spring-flowering bulbs?Now is the time to plant bulbs for a show of early spring color in your garden. Inspect bulbs carefully before making your purchase. They should be large and firm and free of insect damage and other defects. Bulbs should be planted in fertile, well-drained soil that receives at least five to six hours daily of direct sunlight. If the soil is low in fertility, work in 1 pound of a balanced fertilizer, such as 10-10-10, per 25 square feet of area.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,Special to the Sun | May 11, 2003
I am getting a very late start on my vegetable garden and will not be ready to plant until late May or early June. What can I do to help ensure that I still have a productive garden? I would give up on planting any of the early crops like cabbage, peas, spinach and carrots. However, there is still plenty of time to plant a summer and early fall garden with tomatoes, peppers, squash, cucumbers, beans, greens and other vegetables. Although these plants prefer to be planted earlier, they will do fine with a little extra care.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2001
Q. We would like to move several shrubs in our yard. Is this a good time to transplant them, and do you have any suggestions that will help ensure that they survive? A. There are a few exceptions, but the period between late October and early December is a great time to move most plants. The success of the transplant will largely depend on the age and size of the plant, and your ability to get a nice root ball on your plant. In general, it is best to move plants while they are young and relatively small.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | September 30, 2001
It's one of those end-of-summer rituals -- like buying school clothes or stowing the barbecue. Bringing in the plants. With the exception of the giant aloe that lives in the kitchen year-round, all my houseplants spend the summer outdoors. It's good for them and me. In summers like this one, they drink rainwater, and I enjoy the grace notes they add by the garden benches and perennial borders. Some of these plants -- like the hemstitch begonia and the rose geraniums -- have made the spring / fall transition for years.
NEWS
By Helen Schary Motro | July 20, 2000
TEL AVIV -- The Israeli newspaper Ma'ariv recently reported that some tourists to Israel are objects of a small-time swindle by one of the oldest and largest fund-raising organizations in Israel, the Jewish National Fund. It alleged that the organization has been fraudulently charging $10 for the privilege of planting a sapling in Jerusalem soil with one's own hands only to uproot the trees the next day in preparation for the next crop of gullible suckers. The New York Times then pictured a Pennsylvania family holding a sapling in one hand and a JNF certificate in the other, planting their personal little trees, which perhaps were doomed to last no longer than overnight.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1998
Fall is the perfect season for the beginner gardener to get started. It's the traditional time to plant spring-blooming bulbs, which not only are very forgiving and easy to grow, but also provide welcome color during the early part of the year.Bulbs are also reassuringly reliable, as most come back every year. This makes them the natural backbone of most spring gardens.As an added plus, most bulbs are reasonably priced, except a few of the more exotic ones. Also, if you don't like the effect you produce the first spring, bulbs are easy to dig up and move about, or even pull out and discard if, say, the color combination turns out not to be what you had in mind.
FEATURES
October 20, 1996
When and how should I plant spring-flowering bulbs?Now is the time to plant bulbs for a show of early spring color in your garden. Inspect bulbs carefully before making your purchase. They should be large and firm and free of insect damage and other defects. Bulbs should be planted in fertile, well-drained soil that receives at least five to six hours daily of direct sunlight. If the soil is low in fertility, work in 1 pound of a balanced fertilizer, such as 10-10-10, per 25 square feet of area.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 28, 2001
Q. We would like to move several shrubs in our yard. Is this a good time to transplant them, and do you have any suggestions that will help ensure that they survive? A. There are a few exceptions, but the period between late October and early December is a great time to move most plants. The success of the transplant will largely depend on the age and size of the plant, and your ability to get a nice root ball on your plant. In general, it is best to move plants while they are young and relatively small.
FEATURES
By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | April 25, 1992
It's always this way in the garden: You cool your heels for weeks waiting for the weather to warm. Then suddenly in April one beautiful day comes along. The trees seem almost to leaf out overnight. And from that moment on until . . . well, probably November . . . you can never get caught up with all the work.So here we are. That one beautiful day has come and gone. And there will never again be enough hours in the weekend to get everything done. Here is a list of chores (as if you needed more)
FEATURES
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1996
By late summer, the vegetable patch has lost its punch. Tired-looking crops call it quits. The beans look bedraggled, the peppers are pooped and the tomatoes seem plumb tuckered out.The garden has run out of gas. What's a gardener to do, start anew?Exactly. And August is the time to do it.Banish worn-out plants to the compost pile. Why waste time gazing at spent summer crops when you could be planting a fall garden? Jack Frost is two months off, leaving plenty of time to sow and reap fast-growing veggies such as lettuce, radishes, spinach, turnips and beets.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | September 11, 1994
There are 64 trees in our yard, most of them well-behaved. They grow where they're told, stand up straight and never fall on strangers.I have great hopes for these trees, many of which show signs of becoming real shady characters -- not a bad end for maples and oaks.Most of our trees have reached adolescence and can take care of themselves. They are mature enough to cope with the perils of suburban life without my rushing over every time they meet up with a scratching cat, a wetting dog or a biting lawn mower.
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