Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTime Slot
IN THE NEWS

Time Slot

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By MARTY McGEE | December 1, 1991
More complex issues concerning the relationship between television and Maryland racing will surface if off-track betting legislation is passed next year. But a more immediate concern to local racing fans is getting a better time slot to watch replays of races from Laurel and Pimlico race courses.The current arrangement between Home Team Sports and the tracks expires at the end of the year, and representatives for both met recently to discuss a new contract. Jim Mango, Laurel/Pimlico vice president, said the tracks are trying to get a more attractive slot.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | November 8, 2000
The doctor is looking sickly. In Baltimore, as elsewhere, sluggish ratings and a persistent public relations campaign waged by gay activists have prevented Laura Schlessinger's fledgling television talk program from gaining a secure foothold. Now, CBS is shifting the program from the afternoon to early morning spots (such as 2 a.m.) on the local stations it owns that broadcast the show. Those stations can be found in the largest metropolitan areas in the country, such as New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 28, 1990
It was supposed to be just a one-time trial tonight, but now NBC has made it official and moved "Working It Out" to Wednesdays at 9:30.It will make its debut in that time slot on Channel 2 (WMAR) tonight with another top-notch outing of this well-crafted comedy starring Jane Curtin and Stephen Collins as two divorced people groping their way into a serious relationship.Henny Youngman is the unlikely guest star, playing himself in this episode as Curtin's character, Sarah, has trouble with the L-word -- the middle one of those famed "three little words" -- when Collins' David lets it slip out one night.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 2, 2000
You are inside a news meeting at the New York Ledger, the fictional tabloid paper at the heart of "Deadline," a jazzy newspaper drama premiering tonight on NBC. "Page 8?" managing editor Nikki Masucci (Bebe Neuwirth) asks demandingly as she takes her seat at one end of a long conference table. "One of the Mrs. Trump's corgis took a crap in the lobby of one of the Donald's casinos. I'm checking which one," says gossip columnist Hildy Baker (Hope Davis). "Great. Sports?" Masucci snaps.
FEATURES
By Howard Henry Chen and Howard Henry Chen,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1994
Conan . . . Conan . . . Conan . . . he's gone.WMAR (Channel 2) has dropped the "Conan O'Brien Show" from its late-night lineup, with last Monday night's program being the last broadcast. Jon Stewart's syndicated talk show slipped into the old 12:30 p.m. time slot starting last night, according to WMAR General Manager Joe Lewin."[Conan] really hasn't done that well in this market," said Mr. Lewin. "We gave the show every opportunity -- we gave it the time slot, we promoted it -- it just wasn't going to make it."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 1, 1998
Today, class, we will use for our lesson the periodical that represents an eminent contribution to American journalism and literature: TV Guide.Reaction to the Jerry Springer column has been swift and mostly anti-Springer. The lone letter that wasn't comes from a woman who must be the bravest person in all of Maryland. Clovia Sampson of Baltimore wrote:"Why is everyone criticizing 'The Jerry Springer Show'? Does everything we watch have to be intellectually stimulating? I don't think so, or we would have a world of geniuses."
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2000
"Nasty" Nestor Aparicio is going national five days a week for four hours. Beginning April 3, Baltimore's Aparicio will be heard in 140 radio markets around the country on the One On One radio network of Northbrook, Ill. Aparicio, 31, will have the 2 to 6 p.m. time slot Monday through Friday for his "Nasty Nationwide" show that will be aired locally each day from 2 to 4 p.m. on WBIS (1190 AM). WBIS is a 10,000-watt business radio station located in Annapolis. The station is scheduled to be upgraded to 50,000 watts this summer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 12, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- CBS Entertainment President Jeff Sagansky said yesterday that he is sure his network will get David Letterman."He's our guy," Sagansky said at a press conference here. "We want him desperately. We've been pursuing him for five months. We're going to get him."Although Sagansky has all the confidence in the world, it's still not official. NBC has until Friday to match the CBS offer, which includes an 11:30 p.m. time slot for Letterman and reportedly $14 million annually over two years.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 29, 1997
Recent listeners to Stan "The Fan" Charles' nightly talk show on WJFK (1300 AM) probably have gotten the sense that getting callers to dial him up consistently has been something of a struggle.Well, the new Arbitron ratings for the spring are in, covering a period from March to June, and they quantify what has mostly been an impression, that Charles is hurting in his new time slot, 7-10 p.m., and at the new station.Among all adults aged 18 and over, Charles' show attracted an average of 1,100 listeners per quarter-hour, a far cry from the 18,300 who were dialed into Greg Sher's show on WBAL (1090 AM)
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | March 18, 1997
To all the late-night sports talk fans in town, Stan "The Fan" Charles says he's sorry and hopes you'll understand.Charles, the city's best sports talker, has decided to pull up stakes from WCBM (680 AM), effective tonight, though his "Baltimore Sports Exchange" will continue through Saturday in its 10 p.m. time slot with guest hosts.In the end, Charles, 45, who has been on the air in some fashion for the past 15 years, decided that the night-owl shift just wasn't for him anymore, especially given the high demands of his show, which included his selling the commercial time within the program.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | March 28, 2000
"Nasty" Nestor Aparicio is going national five days a week for four hours. Beginning April 3, Baltimore's Aparicio will be heard in 140 radio markets around the country on the One On One radio network of Northbrook, Ill. Aparicio, 31, will have the 2 to 6 p.m. time slot Monday through Friday for his "Nasty Nationwide" show that will be aired locally each day from 2 to 4 p.m. on WBIS (1190 AM). WBIS is a 10,000-watt business radio station located in Annapolis. The station is scheduled to be upgraded to 50,000 watts this summer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 27, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- It was vintage Bryant Gumbel.In meeting with the press to discuss his role as anchor of a new CBS morning show, he acknowledged mistakes were made in his last job at the network, host of the failed prime-time newsmagazine"Public Eye With Bryant Gumbel.""I'm a proud guy and a confident guy, and any time you don't do as well as you thought you could have, you come away somewhat tainted. There were a lot of reasons it didn't work, many of them mine," Gumbel said.But when he was asked to be specific about his failings, he ended the discussion, saying, "I don't think this is the proper forum to discuss it."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 2, 1999
IN OUR NEVER-ENDING search for villains in the Littleton, Colo., shooting spree that left 15 people, including the alleged gunmen, dead, we have trotted out the usual suspects. Liberals have targeted the National Rifle Association and too many guns, conservatives have blamed violent movies, video games and music.How could we leave out TV? Don Sachs has another suspect that hasn't been trotted out, one whom teens -- in Baltimore at least -- can watch five days a week: Jerry Springer. Well, not so much Springer as his so-called "talk" show that stinks up the airwaves coast-to-coast on Monday through Friday.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 24, 1999
It seems like we've been talking about it for months. But there's a changing of the guard finally about to take place on late, late night CBS.Tom Snyder leaves "The Later Late Show with Tom Snyder" at the end of the week. And, then, on Tuesday starting at 12: 35 a.m., it becomes "The Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn."Kilborn, the former host of "The Daily Show" on Comedy Central, is going from the network of "South Park" to the network of "Diagnosis Murder." Will he have to adjust?"Well, I think of it as more as I'm following David Letterman, which to me is the greatest," Kilborn said.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 17, 1999
As we hold our breaths the next six weeks awaiting word from NBC on the fate of "Homicide: Life on the Street," here's another series that's on the bubble and definitely worth worrying about: "Lateline" with Al Franken.The NBC ensemble sitcom about life inside a network news show that's very much like ABC's "Nightline" returned last night for a six-week run. NBC is giving the series its best time period so far -- between two series that are guaranteed to return next fall, "3rd Rock from the Sun" and "Just Shoot Me."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 1, 1998
Today, class, we will use for our lesson the periodical that represents an eminent contribution to American journalism and literature: TV Guide.Reaction to the Jerry Springer column has been swift and mostly anti-Springer. The lone letter that wasn't comes from a woman who must be the bravest person in all of Maryland. Clovia Sampson of Baltimore wrote:"Why is everyone criticizing 'The Jerry Springer Show'? Does everything we watch have to be intellectually stimulating? I don't think so, or we would have a world of geniuses."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 2, 1999
IN OUR NEVER-ENDING search for villains in the Littleton, Colo., shooting spree that left 15 people, including the alleged gunmen, dead, we have trotted out the usual suspects. Liberals have targeted the National Rifle Association and too many guns, conservatives have blamed violent movies, video games and music.How could we leave out TV? Don Sachs has another suspect that hasn't been trotted out, one whom teens -- in Baltimore at least -- can watch five days a week: Jerry Springer. Well, not so much Springer as his so-called "talk" show that stinks up the airwaves coast-to-coast on Monday through Friday.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | September 16, 1991
IF YOU LISTEN closely this week, you can hear the sound of very large tokens being dropped into huge slot machines. Of enormous dice being tossed on very-high-stakes crap tables. Of expensive balls rolling round and round and round an electronic roulette wheel.It's premiere week and millions of dollars are on the table as the networks wait to see what the American viewing public has as its hole card. The four networks are putting more than 25 new shows on this fall -- the count varies depending on how you score revamped ones.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 27, 1997
In only her second time playing slot machines, Carolyn Curran of White Marsh won $1.2 million yesterday morning at the Sands Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City, N.J.The Head Start teacher plans to take a few hours off work today. "I am going to see a tax consultant, a financial consultant and a lawyer," she said.Curran and her fiance, Jeff Swartz, a Papa John's Pizza manager in Bel Air, also have upgraded their wedding ceremony plans. They're considering the Camden Yards warehouse.When Curran hit it big, a friend went over to the craps table to tell Swartz.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | July 29, 1997
Recent listeners to Stan "The Fan" Charles' nightly talk show on WJFK (1300 AM) probably have gotten the sense that getting callers to dial him up consistently has been something of a struggle.Well, the new Arbitron ratings for the spring are in, covering a period from March to June, and they quantify what has mostly been an impression, that Charles is hurting in his new time slot, 7-10 p.m., and at the new station.Among all adults aged 18 and over, Charles' show attracted an average of 1,100 listeners per quarter-hour, a far cry from the 18,300 who were dialed into Greg Sher's show on WBAL (1090 AM)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.