Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTimbuktu
IN THE NEWS

Timbuktu

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2000
Timbuktu is a big restaurant that serves big food. Slabs of red meat. Plates overflowing with pasta. Towering layer cakes. The restaurant has changed a lot since Michael Stavlas purchased it in the early 1980s. Timbuktu was then a small bar. Stavlas spent two years expanding the place. And expanding. Now, the original bar is a tiny part of an enormous 600-seat restaurant run by his nephew George Anagnostou. As the restaurant grew, one thing didn't change: the name. Anagnostou doesn't know why the original bar was called Timbuktu, but his family decided to keep the name.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | June 20, 2007
TIMBUKTU RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 1726 Dorsey Road, Hanover / / 410-796-0733 HOURS / / 11 a.m.-11 p.m. daily IN AND OUT IN / / 3 minutes With only a sliver of strawberry sauce in the middle and one berry on top, this shortcake was just a tease. It cost $3.15, and should have just been called sheet cake. ....................... Know of a good carryout place? Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | June 20, 2007
TIMBUKTU RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 1726 Dorsey Road, Hanover / / 410-796-0733 HOURS / / 11 a.m.-11 p.m. daily IN AND OUT IN / / 3 minutes With only a sliver of strawberry sauce in the middle and one berry on top, this shortcake was just a tease. It cost $3.15, and should have just been called sheet cake. ....................... Know of a good carryout place? Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 3, 2000
Timbuktu is a big restaurant that serves big food. Slabs of red meat. Plates overflowing with pasta. Towering layer cakes. The restaurant has changed a lot since Michael Stavlas purchased it in the early 1980s. Timbuktu was then a small bar. Stavlas spent two years expanding the place. And expanding. Now, the original bar is a tiny part of an enormous 600-seat restaurant run by his nephew George Anagnostou. As the restaurant grew, one thing didn't change: the name. Anagnostou doesn't know why the original bar was called Timbuktu, but his family decided to keep the name.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 18, 1994
Getting it togetherSharon Zorella makes a business of restoring memories. She takes and makes whole again everything from broken dolls to pottery to chipped cups to crystal, both for dealers and individuals. One of her most unusual jobs was to repair a 2,000-year-old water jug from the Mediterranean that was broken in 14 pieces.You can call Zorella Ceramic Restoration at (410) 561-3257 for more information or to set up an appointment.Sponging it upA smelly kitchen sponge is one of the small unpleasant facts of life.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | March 6, 1994
Timbuktu, 1726 Dorsey Road, Hanover, (410) 796-0733. Open Mondays to Saturdays for lunch and dinner, Sundays for dinner only. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair-accessible: yes. Prices: appetizers, $6.95-$7.95; entrees, $8.95-$28.95. No, it's not the town on the southern edge of the Sahara Desert. It's a big, sprawling restaurant near BWI Airport, where the most exotic food on the menu is probably the manicotti.And surely the owners didn't name their restaurant Timbuktu to suggest that it's hard to get to. (According to the menu, the main access to the city in the Republic of Mali is by camel.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 25, 1999
Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. is on a hero quest. He doesn't have Nazis chasing him like Indiana Jones, but he is looking to find the lost Ark of the Covenant and recover an even bigger boon, a true sense of Africa's glories past and present."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,Special to the Sun | June 13, 1999
"Timbuktu," by Paul Auster. Henry Holt & Co. 180 pages. $23.Paul Auster, who first entertained us in the New York trilogy, a trio of odd novellas that were certainly inventive in style and point of view, has, over the last 20 years, written a string of inventive books. He has, as they used to say of John Hersey, never written the same book twice. This is laudatory as long as you provide a story to sustain the changes in style and pacing that result from inventiveness. With Auster, sometimes he does, and sometimes he doesn't.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- The accidental novelist, as a critic once dubbed Paul Auster, sits in his garden on a spring day, insisting he is baffled.He is baffled at the suggestion that identity is a common theme in his novels, even though his characters are always changing names and lives. He is baffled by people who write because they dream of money and glory, although he has ended up earning both. He is baffled that some readers and critics think his latest book, "Timbuktu," is written from a dog's point-of-view, when it's clearly a picaresque novel about love.
SPORTS
September 23, 2005
Good morning --Willie Parker-- If this keeps up, someone should check whether you're wearing glass-slipper cleats. Your turn - Opinions Should the NCAA hold its lacrosse final four anywhere else but Baltimore? Maryland is the center of the lacrosse universe. We have the best teams, fans and facilities. Baltimore should be named the permanent home of the Final Four and be done with it! Alan Jefferson Ellicott City The NCAA should rotate its lacrosse championships to increase the game's visibility in new markets and to enhance the overall development of the sport.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 25, 1999
Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. is on a hero quest. He doesn't have Nazis chasing him like Indiana Jones, but he is looking to find the lost Ark of the Covenant and recover an even bigger boon, a true sense of Africa's glories past and present."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jeff Danziger and Jeff Danziger,Special to the Sun | June 13, 1999
"Timbuktu," by Paul Auster. Henry Holt & Co. 180 pages. $23.Paul Auster, who first entertained us in the New York trilogy, a trio of odd novellas that were certainly inventive in style and point of view, has, over the last 20 years, written a string of inventive books. He has, as they used to say of John Hersey, never written the same book twice. This is laudatory as long as you provide a story to sustain the changes in style and pacing that result from inventiveness. With Auster, sometimes he does, and sometimes he doesn't.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1999
BROOKLYN, N.Y. -- The accidental novelist, as a critic once dubbed Paul Auster, sits in his garden on a spring day, insisting he is baffled.He is baffled at the suggestion that identity is a common theme in his novels, even though his characters are always changing names and lives. He is baffled by people who write because they dream of money and glory, although he has ended up earning both. He is baffled that some readers and critics think his latest book, "Timbuktu," is written from a dog's point-of-view, when it's clearly a picaresque novel about love.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | September 18, 1994
Getting it togetherSharon Zorella makes a business of restoring memories. She takes and makes whole again everything from broken dolls to pottery to chipped cups to crystal, both for dealers and individuals. One of her most unusual jobs was to repair a 2,000-year-old water jug from the Mediterranean that was broken in 14 pieces.You can call Zorella Ceramic Restoration at (410) 561-3257 for more information or to set up an appointment.Sponging it upA smelly kitchen sponge is one of the small unpleasant facts of life.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | March 6, 1994
Timbuktu, 1726 Dorsey Road, Hanover, (410) 796-0733. Open Mondays to Saturdays for lunch and dinner, Sundays for dinner only. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair-accessible: yes. Prices: appetizers, $6.95-$7.95; entrees, $8.95-$28.95. No, it's not the town on the southern edge of the Sahara Desert. It's a big, sprawling restaurant near BWI Airport, where the most exotic food on the menu is probably the manicotti.And surely the owners didn't name their restaurant Timbuktu to suggest that it's hard to get to. (According to the menu, the main access to the city in the Republic of Mali is by camel.
NEWS
November 10, 1993
Leslie White of Ferndale, a member of the Dorsey Kritikos Club of Toastmasters International, recently took first place in a humorous-speech contest held in Glen Burnie.Contestants from Anne Arundel, Howard and Baltimore counties took part in the event Oct. 30.Ms. White went on to participate last Saturday in a district competition held in Columbia against contestants from the area. She took third place with a speech titled "The Back Road."An instructional designer for Maryland Medical Laboratory in Baltimore, Ms. White has lived in Ferndale for five years.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller | nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
In the wake of a federal immigration raid at a Hanover restaurant this month, Anne Arundel County officials targeted several homes near the business where they say illegal workers were living and discovered numerous violations. The county Health Department, along with the permitting and inspections office, found 20 violations at three homes, including unsafe structures and junk and debris. "Employers must be held accountable for violating federal immigration laws, as well as the negative impact they have on the community for forcing their workers to live in deplorable conditions," said Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold, who ordered the inspections.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.