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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Forest Service made changes yesterday in the way it plans management of national forests, shortening the process by years while eliminating the primary tool used by environmentalists to challenge logging and mining in protected forests. The action, which the Forest Service said would cut its planning process from 10 years to two years, drew cautious applause from timber industry spokesmen, who said they hope the change will speed approval for logging. Conservation groups and ecology professors said the new policy takes too much of a piecemeal approach to forest planning and would allow the timber and mining industries to severely damage national forests.
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NEWS
January 30, 2013
Thanks to Tim Wheeler for his article, "Turbines in the Wind" (Jan 28). The wind industry in Western Maryland is just the latest in the litany of industries despoiling their natural resources and landscapes. First, the timber industry denuded the forests, resulting in massive sedimentation of streams. Next came deep coal mines that even today require lime dosers to neutralize the acid drainage. Next, strip mining of coal from the surfaces of land, requiring revegetation that often dies from the acidic soil.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1996
In one of his few environmental initiatives this year, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday he will seek legislation that would more than double the amount of legally protected wilderness in Maryland.The move, if approved by the General Assembly, would designate 17 sites totaling 22,790 acres in state parks and forests as "wildlands," where logging, mining and driving would be prohibited.From prime trout streams in Western Maryland to cypress swamp on the Eastern Shore, the proposed sites are rich in rare plants and animals and represent some of the best remaining examples of Maryland's natural history.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Forest Service made changes yesterday in the way it plans management of national forests, shortening the process by years while eliminating the primary tool used by environmentalists to challenge logging and mining in protected forests. The action, which the Forest Service said would cut its planning process from 10 years to two years, drew cautious applause from timber industry spokesmen, who said they hope the change will speed approval for logging. Conservation groups and ecology professors said the new policy takes too much of a piecemeal approach to forest planning and would allow the timber and mining industries to severely damage national forests.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 22, 1992
...TC WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton's administration is planning a summit on ancient forests in the United States, but no schedule has been set, according to a Clinton aide and environmental and timber industry officials.Lisa Glantz of the National Audubon Society, and Barry Polsky, spokesman for the American Forest Resource Alliance, a timber industry group, said their organizations want to attend.The summit will be an effort to resolve a long-standing dispute between environmentalists, who want to protect old-growth forests and endangered species, and the timber industry, Ms. Glantz and Mr. Polsky said.
NEWS
By Richard Manning | February 26, 1993
Lola,Mont. -- THE timber industry is using rising lumber prices to lure us into an unsettling equation.L We are told that expensive lumber makes houses unaffordable.And we are told to blame environmental protection for these higher prices: How much are we willing to pay, the industry asks, to save a lesser species, the northern spotted owl?Now that the Clinton administration has decided to take away the subsidies that help logging companies clear-cut public lands, timber industry spokesmen will make a parallel argument: Without the publicly financed incentives, expenses will go up and the cost will be passed along to the consumer.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | October 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- One of the most fractious disputes between the United States and its largest trading partner reignited yesterday as the Bush administration took the first step toward imposing retaliatory duties on Canadian lumber imports.President Bush approved the initiation of a government investigation into whether Canadian provinces unfairly subsidize their loggers and therefore should be penalized with higher tariffs.It marked only the second time that the government has "self-initiated" a countervailing duty investigation, rather than responding to industry complaints.
NEWS
May 27, 1996
THERE'S A HEALTH crisis in the nation's forests, the timber industry warns, prescribing a handy remedy: cut them down as fast and freely as possible.That's the kind of greedy, self-interest quackery that ought to be quickly exposed and dismissed. Instead, Sen. Larry Craig of Idaho hopes to enshrine it in law, exempting timber companies from environmental laws and public review while they level swaths of healthy trees on public lands for big profit.The bill, now before Senate committees, would extend for 10 years the controversial clear-cut "salvage" rider on last year's budget appropriations measure.
NEWS
By Timothy Egan and Timothy Egan,New York Times News Service | September 16, 1991
KALISPELL, Mont. -- Supervisors of some of the nation's largest public forests say they have come under intense political pressure to cut more timber than the land can handle.Already, grizzly bears and 20-pound bull trout are in trouble from excessive logging in the forests of the northern Rocky Mountains, biologists say.Managers of these forests say they are slowing the government's logging program to protect fish and wildlife, but they say they are doing so at the risk of their jobs.The timber industry, some Bush administration officials and other politicians argue that trees on the public lands of the Northern Rockies must be logged at a certain level to keep the regional economy afloat.
NEWS
By IAN JOHNSON | October 10, 1993
Second Roach Pond, Maine -- As the day breaks over this long, thin lake, Peter is confronted with the reason for his trip here: a huge bull moose, antlers broad and majestic, standing in a clearing near the camp. The moose stares down its long nose at Peter for 15 minutes until the Brooklynite gains the courage to walk by the moose and launch his canoe.Score one for the moose.Peter's story becomes the talk of the camp that day, and it relieves any fears that the visitors might have had about the veracity of tourist brochures.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2002
In a final boost to Gov. Parris N. Glendening's environmental legacy, the Board of Public Works unanimously approved two multimillion-dollar land deals yesterday to preserve thousands of acres of forests, meadows and wetlands. The board agreed to spend about $19 million on the pair of agreements on the Eastern Shore and in Southern Maryland despite deep concerns from Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp about worsening the state's grim fiscal situation. One of the deals will cost the state $3.5 million to protect 2,000 acres of waterfront property, known as Newport Farms, in Worcester County.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 2002
FAIRFAX, Calif. - Ascending the forested slopes of Mount Tamalpais, 15 miles north of San Francisco, Dr. Matteo Garbelotto and Dr. David Rizzo point out victim after victim of the fast-spreading new disease, sudden oak death syndrome. But despite seeing dead, wilting and yellowing plants throughout these woods, it is hard for an observer to fathom the real power of this plague until the trail abruptly ends in a heap of ghostly white branches and trunks. "We call this site mucho destructo," said Garbelotto, standing in the streaming sunlight next to a carpet of fallen trees where sudden oak death has brought down the forest canopy.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
NO LONGER is the U.S. Forest Service eager to appease the logging industry. The federal agency is putting a new emphasis on using its 192 million acres for recreation and tourism, instead of favoring exploitation, which last year cost taxpayers $88 million in subsidies.An 18-month ban imposed last year on new logging roads on federal land gave rise to this change.Recreation now accounts for three-quarters of the economic activity generated by Forest Service lands. Meantime, timber sales have plummeted 75 percent.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 8, 1998
ALBANY, N.Y. - New York's Gov. George Pataki has announced that the state has reached a landmark agreement to buy nearly 15,000 acres of Adirondack wilderness that the Whitney family had planned to develop, while protecting another tract twice that size for 10 years.The $17.1 million deal opens a pristine stretch of forests, streams and lakes - including Little Tupper Lake, regarded by naturalists as one of the region's jewels - to the public for the first time since William C. Whitney, the industrialist, bought the land for a family retreat a century ago.The acquisition will connect separate tracts of publicly owned forests in the Adirondacks, allowing canoeists and other adventurers to travel hundreds of miles without interruption.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 1997
KETCHIKAN, Alaska -- It is the emerald forest of myth: a land of brooding trees and fog-swathed fiords, high fields of ice and coves thick with fish, sprawling 500 miles across the edge of a continent. It is the last great green land.Alaska's Tongass National Forest is the largest and most intact temperate rain forest on Earth -- 17 million acres.But 40 years after the federal government launched a campaign to tame the Tongass by churning its timber into a network of pulp mills and sawmills, the future of its remaining grand old stands of Sitka spruce and hemlock has erupted into one of the biggest resource battles of the 1990s.
NEWS
May 27, 1996
THERE'S A HEALTH crisis in the nation's forests, the timber industry warns, prescribing a handy remedy: cut them down as fast and freely as possible.That's the kind of greedy, self-interest quackery that ought to be quickly exposed and dismissed. Instead, Sen. Larry Craig of Idaho hopes to enshrine it in law, exempting timber companies from environmental laws and public review while they level swaths of healthy trees on public lands for big profit.The bill, now before Senate committees, would extend for 10 years the controversial clear-cut "salvage" rider on last year's budget appropriations measure.
NEWS
By Rudy Abramson and Rudy Abramson,Los Angeles Times | January 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- After months of studying the economic cost of protecting the threatened northern spotted owl, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said yesterday that it has designated 6.88 million acres of old-growth forest in Washington, Oregon and Northern California as habitat critical to the creature's survival.Federal officials have estimated that saving the owl could cost 33,000 jobs in the Northwest, but the timber industry maintains that the toll could reach 80,000 to 100,000.The designation, which in effect would restrict timber-cutting on the land, is still subject to review by the Department of the Interior and is likely to face other challenges.
NEWS
June 18, 1998
NO LONGER is the U.S. Forest Service eager to appease the logging industry. The federal agency is putting a new emphasis on using its 192 million acres for recreation and tourism, instead of favoring exploitation, which last year cost taxpayers $88 million in subsidies.An 18-month ban imposed last year on new logging roads on federal land gave rise to this change.Recreation now accounts for three-quarters of the economic activity generated by Forest Service lands. Meantime, timber sales have plummeted 75 percent.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1996
In one of his few environmental initiatives this year, Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday he will seek legislation that would more than double the amount of legally protected wilderness in Maryland.The move, if approved by the General Assembly, would designate 17 sites totaling 22,790 acres in state parks and forests as "wildlands," where logging, mining and driving would be prohibited.From prime trout streams in Western Maryland to cypress swamp on the Eastern Shore, the proposed sites are rich in rare plants and animals and represent some of the best remaining examples of Maryland's natural history.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 16, 1994
SPRINGFIELD, Ore. -- By now, the timber communities of Oregon were supposed to be ghost towns. There was going to be an epidemic of foreclosures, a recession so crippling it would mean "we'll be up to our neck in owls, and every millworker will be out of a job," as President George Bush predicted two years ago while campaigning in the Northwest.Politicians in both parties agreed. The villain was the northern spotted owl, an endangered bird fond of the same ancient national forests desired by loggers.
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