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NEWS
April 6, 1993
After taking on the job as logjam-breaker in the explosive battle between environmentalists and loggers in the Pacific Northwest, President Clinton must have considered his meeting with Russian President Boris Yeltsin last weekend as easy as breaking a match-stick. Instead of dealing with a foreign leader whose agenda coincides with his, Mr. Clinton had to begin fashioning a Northwest compromise that he knew in advance would work only if it satisfies none of the voters he so loves to woo.Ever since a federal judge ordered an end in 1991 to logging in a Maryland-sized forest area that is home to the endangered northern spotted owl, Washington, Oregon and northern California have been a battleground.
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SPORTS
By Nelson Coffin, Baltimore Sun Media Group and By Nelson Coffin, Baltimore Sun Media Group | April 25, 2014
There are several reasons that, according to at least one assessment, 2013 timber champion Foyle has been installed as the favorite heading into the 118th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup on Saturday in Glyndon. Gates open at 11 a.m. for a 4 pm. post time for the $75,000 steeplechase race, which will run on what is generally regarded as one of the most daunting courses in the sport. For one thing, Foyle will have a new mount. Highly regarded British amateur rider Sam Waley-Cohen replaces James Slater, who guided the Merriefield Farm 9-year-old to a photo finish in the $30,000 Grand National last weekend in Butler, losing by a nose to Spencer Road.
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NEWS
By Tim Hermach | September 25, 1991
THE House Subcommittee on Civil Service is meeting with top Forest Service officials to determine whether pressure has been put on government employees to permit increased logging on federal lands.The answer is probably "yes."In his decision May 23 to temporarily halt logging in parts of the Northwest, William L. Dwyer, a federal judge in Seattle, suggested that excessive logging was "not the doing of scientists, foresters, rangers and others at the working levels of these agencies. It reflects decisions made by higher authorities in the executive branch of government."
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2012
If a tree falls in a Maryland forest, does anyone know its value? State Forester Steve Koehn threw back his head and laughed when asked that question. And then he jumped at the chance to shed some light on what he calls one of Maryland's best-kept secrets. "Forest products are a $4 billion-a-year industry in Maryland," he said. "For comparison, seafood is a $950 million industry. " Koehn stood on a gentle slope in the middle of a towering stand of poplar trees, their golden leaves electrified by a bright fall sun. Eighteen months ago, loggers harvested that private plot in western Baltimore County, removing about half of the trees.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | July 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's approach to the searing controversy over timber in the Pacific Northwest is a classic distillation of the strengths and weaknesses the new president has displayed in his first five months in the White House.On the one hand, Clinton has shown optimism and aggressiveness by his willingness to confront a complex and vexing problem that has resisted solution for years. He believes with good reason that he was elected to effect change, and he believes that activist government has an obligation to deal with the most difficult problems, whether they be national or regional, where only federal intervention seems to offer any hope of a solution.
BUSINESS
By BILL BARNHART | February 29, 2004
TONIGHT'S Academy Awards gala likely will show film clips of sylvan vistas in New Zealand, drawn from the The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. Investors have their eyes on the Kiwi forests for a different reason. The Harvard University endowment recently acquired 408,000 acres of timber rights in New Zealand, the biggest commercial forest in the nation. The investment by America's largest university endowment ($20 billion) is helping create an unlikely group of tree-huggers.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 30, 2003
MOSCOW - Bootleg loggers might seem to have no interest in seeing forests burn. But in Russia, they might. As Siberia and the Russian Far East endure an unusually severe wildfire season, authorities right up to President Vladimir V. Putin contend that in many cases the blazes were set by timber poachers to aid or hide their thievery. Unusually dry spring weather also contributed to the thousands of fires, which began in April and have devastated widely scattered areas totaling more than 6,600 square miles, including about 5,000 square miles of forest, according to the Emergency Situations Ministry.
SPORTS
By Bo Smolka and Bo Smolka,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 11, 1999
Overcoming a slow early pace, Proud Dawg edged Ninewa by a length yesterday to win the $17,500 My Lady's Manor three-mile timber race in Monkton.Much attention was focused on Saluter, the Maryland timber horse who has won five straight runnings of the Virginia Gold Cup and was making his 1999 debut yesterday. But Saluter was third, finishing five lengths behind the leaders in the steeplechase."It was a very slow pace for the first mile and a half," said trainer Tom Voss, whose Manor entry, Welter Weight, was scratched.
NEWS
April 17, 2001
HORSE RACES and Maryland go hand in hand. George Washington wagered on the ponies in Annapolis. So did other colonials. Be it on a flat track or a point-to-point race over timber fences and rolling farmland, springtime horse racing is steeped in Maryland tradition. The season is in full swing. Pimlico's two-month program of live racing peaks with the $750,000 Pimlico Special on May 12 and the 126th running of the $1 million Preakness Stakes, for the best three-year-old thoroughbreds, on May 19. Meanwhile, the steeplechase season has been underway since late March.
BUSINESS
By Elizabeth Klein and Elizabeth Klein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2002
As you drive up Angie and Craig Long's home site in West Friendship, the frame house looks like any other cookie-cutter house that could be found in most any neighborhood. But enter the house and all of a sudden one is overwhelmed by the thick wooden frame. The Longs are building a timber-frame house - a house that Angie Long believes is reserved for "a certain type of person, one who's in touch with nature and the environment." "It's like big pieces of furniture that you live in," said Tony Zaya, owner of Lancaster County Timber Frames in York, Pa., which cut the timber for the Long house.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
At age 48, Billy Meister has covered the entire course of the Maryland steeplechase scene, starting even before he was born. "My mother had two falls [while riding] with me when she was pregnant. " he said, chuckling at the thought. Meister competed in a pony race at age 7 and began taking timber fences at 12. Seven years later, he launched a training career, and five years after that went on his own as a conditioner of jumpers. He has trained for virtually the entire gamut of owners who run in the state and is known as a highly capable, sometimes fearless, jockey.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | February 21, 2010
Years after it survived a fire, was dismantled and hauled away, a landmark of the East Towson African-American community is coming home. The so-called Jacob House, a 19th-century log cabin about the size of a living room, is expected back in town this summer, when the timbers will be driven down from near Mercersburg, Pa., unloaded from a truck and put back together a few blocks from the site where it stood until 2001. "It's part of our history, it's something that's been in the neighborhood," said Adelaide Bentley, a lifelong resident of East Towson who has been part of a years-long effort by citizens and Baltimore County government to salvage the cabin and find a place for it. "Let the people of East Towson know what their ancestors did."
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | December 23, 2007
We want to include a fireplace in the family room of a vacation home we're building in the mountains. Can you offer some suggestions regarding that particular element as well as the overall design, which we envision as strongly rustic. Fireplaces were originally all about function, but today they're valued at least as much for their charm as for the warmth they generate. Everyone wants a fireplace. And while it's neither easy nor inexpensive to install one in an existing space, such an addition can be successful as long as potential problems are identified and addressed.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | April 29, 2007
Pirates of all shapes and sizes bounded off the Clipper City tall ship yesterday, dressed in black hats and pirate garb, pistols at the ready, for their annual invasion of Fells Point. Greeting them was Vince Zegowitz, a 64-year-old retired oceanographer whose ruddy face attested to his 30 years at sea. He roamed the wharf with his family, dressed in loose black pants, black construction boots, a flowing white blouse, black vest and black bandana. "I feel like Johnny Depp in drag - because these are all women's clothes," he said jokingly.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 2006
We inherited a retaining wall of landscape timber built into our sloped backyard. I want to plant a few edibles by the wall but am concerned about arsenic leaching from the wood (built about 1992). Can I test the soil's safety? Old landscape timbers may be treated with creosote or CCA (chromated copper arsenate). Their chemicals can leach into soil and be taken up by plants. CCA lumber was phased out beginning in 2002 because of possible health risks. We recommend that treated lumber not be used for raised beds where edible crops will be grown.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2005
The Maryland and national timber racing seasons will be launched in earnest today when the 95th annual My Lady's Manor program is conducted in Monkton. A three-race card starting with the $25,000 feature will begin at 1:30 p.m., with eight contenders scheduled to go in the three-mile My Lady's Manor event over timber fences. Nearly 10,000 fans are expected for Harford County's most-attended sporting event in what promises to be ideal spring weather. Until last year -- when Irv Naylor's New Zealand-bred, Askim, prevailed -- trainer Tom Voss had dominated at My Lady's Manor in the 2000s, winning three straight with Ironfist and scoring again two years ago with Sam Sullivan.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1997
MARYLAND'S Program Open Space recently earmarked almost $1 million to preserve parkland. But the money's most immediate effect might be cutting down a large, old Eastern Shore forest.Protecting forests gets lots of lip service -- and some action -- as study after study shows the value of forests for protecting water quality and maintaining wildlife and plant species.But consider the proposals for the latest and largest park in Wicomico County on the lower Shore, and you wonder if we understand the difference between the price of timber and the worth of forests.
NEWS
April 12, 1994
POLICE LOG* Oakland Mills: 8500 block of High Timber Court: A door leading from a home's garage was kicked in Thursday morning, but police said nothing was taken.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2005
OF TENS of thousands of rounds played a year ago at every golf course within about 15 minutes of the Howard County-owned Timbers at Troy course, about a third were played by golfers 60 or older. That marketing statistic is a big reason Timbers is rolling out a new tactic this spring, aimed at attracting senior golfers. "We're not getting our share," said Kyle Warfield, general manager and PGA pro at the Elkridge course, who noted the marketing data. "It wasn't ever intentional, but this has never been a popular venue for seniors."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Forest Service made changes yesterday in the way it plans management of national forests, shortening the process by years while eliminating the primary tool used by environmentalists to challenge logging and mining in protected forests. The action, which the Forest Service said would cut its planning process from 10 years to two years, drew cautious applause from timber industry spokesmen, who said they hope the change will speed approval for logging. Conservation groups and ecology professors said the new policy takes too much of a piecemeal approach to forest planning and would allow the timber and mining industries to severely damage national forests.
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