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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 13, 1992
It almost takes Aladdin's lamp to track down lyricist Tim Rice. And so -- abracadabra! -- the moment his voice finally comes over the phone is like making contact with the genie himself.Except, of course, that Rice -- who wrote some of the lyrics for Disney's new hit animation, "Aladdin" -- doesn't sound a bit like a genie. To the contrary, the British songwriter is so soft-spoken he almost sounds as if he's trapped in the magic lamp.However, Rice has a lot to talk about these days. Of course, there's "Aladdin" -- a project he undertook at the 11th hour, after the death of the original lyricist, Baltimore native Howard Ashman.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
With the broad appeal of a fast-food chain — 54 million people served in 14 countries on five continents — "The Lion King" enjoys a mighty status on Broadway, where it's the seventh-longest-running musical and has packed them in since 1997. The show isn't likely to lose its appeal on tour any time soon, either. When it first played the Hippodrome in 2005, it was a 14-week smash, raking in $15 million. It's back at the theater for a monthlong engagement that is bound to be just as fruitful, nicely timed as it is for the holidays, when families with kids need diversions even more.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 23, 1999
If you really want to understand what "Elton John and Tim Rice's Aida" is, start by looking at what it's not.First of all, "Aida" is not a rock opera. True, it draws from the same story that gave us Verdi's opera about the doomed love affair between the Egyptian general Radames and the Nubian slave girl Aida. But as rewritten by Tim Rice and Elton John -- the same team that gave us Disney's "The Lion King" -- this "Aida" has no arias and no triumphant march, just a string of plot-related pop songs.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2003
While most theater troupes have been sending Yuletide heroes including Ebenezer Scrooge and George Bailey to center stage in recent weeks, Children's Theatre of Annapolis has bucked the seasonal trend by reaching back to the Hebrew Bible and the story of Joseph and his dazzling coat of many colors. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat has become the most popular of the rock operas by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber. (Evita and Jesus Christ Superstar round out that remarkable threesome.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 13, 2002
There's no danger that anyone is going to mistake Elton John and Tim Rice's Aida for Verdi's opera. And that's not necessarily a bad thing. This Disney-backed show takes a tragic Italian opera and turns it into a pop Broadway musical - and a slick one at that. There's a driving Europop beat in much of John's music, and touches of updated humor in the book by Linda Woolverton, David Henry Hwang and Robert Falls (who does double duty as director). After an abortive 1998 Broadway tryout in Atlanta, Disney fired the show's original director and designer and brought in Falls, Hwang and designer Bob Crowley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2011
With the broad appeal of a fast-food chain — 54 million people served in 14 countries on five continents — "The Lion King" enjoys a mighty status on Broadway, where it's the seventh-longest-running musical and has packed them in since 1997. The show isn't likely to lose its appeal on tour any time soon, either. When it first played the Hippodrome in 2005, it was a 14-week smash, raking in $15 million. It's back at the theater for a monthlong engagement that is bound to be just as fruitful, nicely timed as it is for the holidays, when families with kids need diversions even more.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford | May 8, 1991
The Western District Police Community Relations Council is scheduledto meet at 7:30 p.m. tonight at the Western District Police Station on Route 170 in Odenton.The guest speaker will be Prince George'sCounty Chief of Police David B. Mitchell. Mitchell will present the organization and law enforcement approaches of a neighboring police department.Also scheduled to speak is Capt. Franklin Milholland, new WesternDistrict commander. Milholland will discuss plans for handling law enforcement problems in the community.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 8, 1996
To paraphrase a song title, "be a guest" at the Kennedy Center's "Beauty and the Beast," and you'll definitely feel welcome.One of the most inspired scenes in Disney's animated movie of "Beauty and the Beast" was "Be Our Guest" -- a production number performed by a cast of singing and dancing kitchenware.The inspiration to bring household objects to life came from the film's executive producer and lyricist, Howard Ashman, a native Baltimorean who died in 1991, the year the movie was released.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2003
While most theater troupes have been sending Yuletide heroes including Ebenezer Scrooge and George Bailey to center stage in recent weeks, Children's Theatre of Annapolis has bucked the seasonal trend by reaching back to the Hebrew Bible and the story of Joseph and his dazzling coat of many colors. Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat has become the most popular of the rock operas by Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber. (Evita and Jesus Christ Superstar round out that remarkable threesome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Los Angeles Daily News | November 22, 1991
The new Disney movie "Beauty and the Beast" becomes still more poignant when one realizes it contains the final completed score of Baltimore-born playwright and lyricist Howard Ashman, who died in March of AIDS at age 40.Both Alan Menken, his collaborator on several scores, and Linda Woolverton, with whom he shaped the "Beauty and the Beast" screenplay, found it difficult to put into words their intense sorrow at his early death. "He was one of my closest, dearest friends," Mr. Menken said at a recent press conference.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 13, 2002
There's no danger that anyone is going to mistake Elton John and Tim Rice's Aida for Verdi's opera. And that's not necessarily a bad thing. This Disney-backed show takes a tragic Italian opera and turns it into a pop Broadway musical - and a slick one at that. There's a driving Europop beat in much of John's music, and touches of updated humor in the book by Linda Woolverton, David Henry Hwang and Robert Falls (who does double duty as director). After an abortive 1998 Broadway tryout in Atlanta, Disney fired the show's original director and designer and brought in Falls, Hwang and designer Bob Crowley.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 23, 1999
If you really want to understand what "Elton John and Tim Rice's Aida" is, start by looking at what it's not.First of all, "Aida" is not a rock opera. True, it draws from the same story that gave us Verdi's opera about the doomed love affair between the Egyptian general Radames and the Nubian slave girl Aida. But as rewritten by Tim Rice and Elton John -- the same team that gave us Disney's "The Lion King" -- this "Aida" has no arias and no triumphant march, just a string of plot-related pop songs.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 8, 1996
To paraphrase a song title, "be a guest" at the Kennedy Center's "Beauty and the Beast," and you'll definitely feel welcome.One of the most inspired scenes in Disney's animated movie of "Beauty and the Beast" was "Be Our Guest" -- a production number performed by a cast of singing and dancing kitchenware.The inspiration to bring household objects to life came from the film's executive producer and lyricist, Howard Ashman, a native Baltimorean who died in 1991, the year the movie was released.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | December 13, 1992
It almost takes Aladdin's lamp to track down lyricist Tim Rice. And so -- abracadabra! -- the moment his voice finally comes over the phone is like making contact with the genie himself.Except, of course, that Rice -- who wrote some of the lyrics for Disney's new hit animation, "Aladdin" -- doesn't sound a bit like a genie. To the contrary, the British songwriter is so soft-spoken he almost sounds as if he's trapped in the magic lamp.However, Rice has a lot to talk about these days. Of course, there's "Aladdin" -- a project he undertook at the 11th hour, after the death of the original lyricist, Baltimore native Howard Ashman.
NEWS
By Vicki Wellford | May 8, 1991
The Western District Police Community Relations Council is scheduledto meet at 7:30 p.m. tonight at the Western District Police Station on Route 170 in Odenton.The guest speaker will be Prince George'sCounty Chief of Police David B. Mitchell. Mitchell will present the organization and law enforcement approaches of a neighboring police department.Also scheduled to speak is Capt. Franklin Milholland, new WesternDistrict commander. Milholland will discuss plans for handling law enforcement problems in the community.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | March 1, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Dolly Parton will star as a radio-station receptionist who winds up as a talk-show psychiatrist in the Hollywood Pictures-Sandollar musical "Straight Talk." Parton will write the songs, Tim Rice will oversee the music. Barnett Kellman directs Pat Resnick's script in Chicago in June for producer Robert Chartoff.Armand Assante and Antonio Banderas will star in Pace Films' "Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love," based on Oscar Hijuelos' award-winning novel. Arnold Glimcher produces and directs Cynthia Cidre's script in New York and Los Angeles beginning March 12.
NEWS
July 14, 1991
Phoenix Festival Theater will present the Andrew Lloyd Weber/Tim Rice musical "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat," July 19 to 21 and 26 to 28, at Harford Community College's Chesapeake Theater. Curtain times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, and 3 p.m. Sundays."Joseph" is the retelling of the biblical story of Joseph and his coat of many colors, with a musical twist that ranges from country and western to calypso.The audience is invited to a champagne reception with the cast and crew following the opening night performance Friday.
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