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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 17, 2003
Tim Reid decided early in his acting days that he wanted to be a producer, too - to hold the reins of his career. That realization hit right about the time when a white network official fired him from a proposed television show because he wasn't "black enough." "I'm not sure black folks fully understand the power that media has in our life," Reid told roughly 200 people yesterday at the Carl Murphy Fine Arts Center. "We are becoming who they portray us as being. We've allowed ourselves to become a collection of negative statistics.
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By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | April 17, 2003
Tim Reid decided early in his acting days that he wanted to be a producer, too - to hold the reins of his career. That realization hit right about the time when a white network official fired him from a proposed television show because he wasn't "black enough." "I'm not sure black folks fully understand the power that media has in our life," Reid told roughly 200 people yesterday at the Carl Murphy Fine Arts Center. "We are becoming who they portray us as being. We've allowed ourselves to become a collection of negative statistics.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 1999
Plans call for a new television series to be filmed in Baltimore, and two of Hollywood's more accomplished producers will be here early next year to shoot its pilot episode.The show, a weekly drama about a young boxer titled "The Contender," is being produced by Hugh Wilson and Tim Reid, co-producers of the short-lived but critically acclaimed "Frank's Place" series on CBS, said Paul McGuire, a senior vice president at United Paramount Network in Los Angeles."The pilot is shooting in Baltimore -- totally in Baltimore -- that's the plan, and that's about all I can tell you right now," McGuire said.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 1999
Plans call for a new television series to be filmed in Baltimore, and two of Hollywood's more accomplished producers will be here early next year to shoot its pilot episode.The show, a weekly drama about a young boxer titled "The Contender," is being produced by Hugh Wilson and Tim Reid, co-producers of the short-lived but critically acclaimed "Frank's Place" series on CBS, said Paul McGuire, a senior vice president at United Paramount Network in Los Angeles."The pilot is shooting in Baltimore -- totally in Baltimore -- that's the plan, and that's about all I can tell you right now," McGuire said.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 15, 1998
PASADENA, Calif. -- One of the great things about Tim Reid as a producer is that he believes television programs should have a social mission -- and the bigger the better. His new series, "Linc's," debuting Aug. 1 on Showtime, is no exception."Personally, my goal for this show is to explode the myth that black folks are monolithic," he said during a press conference here this week."That we are all one thing -- we're all liberal Democrats, we all do this, we all do that. We're either in Princeton or prison; there's no in between."
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By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 14, 1991
This week's cover story on multimillionaire Reginald Lewi came about in a roundabout way. Features writer Mary Corey hadn't planned to do a profile on him, but she had heard that The Sun had been trying to get an interview for three or four years without success. Writers had been told he just wasn't talking.Mary, meanwhile, was working on a feature story about actors Tim Reid and Daphne Maxwell Reid. During the interview, Tim Reid told her that Reginald Lewis was a role model for black people and a personal hero of his. She wanted to use the quote in her story, so she called Lewis' international company, TLC Beatrice, to confirm a couple of things.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1998
The Bold and the Banal: Showtime manages to display both tonight.The Bold comes first, with the 10 p.m. debut of "Linc's Place," an hourlong comedy set inside a Washington bar and grill. And what sets it apart is made apparent in the course of an opening monologue from Linc's owner Russell Lincoln (Steven Williams), who bemoans how liberal whites get together to make films about African-Americans and the result is "classic films like 'Booty Call.' ""Linc's Place" is that rarest of TV commodities, a series about minorities -- in this case, African-Americans -- that treats them as people, not as demographics.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 8, 1992
Los Angeles -- It was not one of the bigger press conferences here on the fall TV preview tour. But it held one of those moments where hundreds of disparate facts and developments in the revolution that television is going through suddenly froze in a kind of perfect alignment and led to an inescapable conclusion: Cable TV is going to grind the networks to dust because it is really starting to reflect our cultural diversity. Cable TV is connecting with multicultural America in a way the networks seem incapable of understanding.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 13, 1994
We all know where Archie Bunker's chair is -- in the Smithsonian.Now, CBS is going to take us back to Queens to show us who's living in Archie's old house at 704 Hauser.That's the premise of "704 Hauser," a new sitcom from Norman Lear set to debut on CBS in March, after the Olympics.The occupants of Archie's old house are Ernest and Rose Cumberbatch and their son, Thurgood Marshall Cumberbatch -- an African-American family.Ernest (John Amos) is a "blue-collar liberal and veteran of the civil rights battles of the '60s," according to Lear.
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
IN THE Flite Three Studios out on Cold Spring Lane, Tim Reid and Daphne Maxwell Reid talked to Cathy Rigby yesterday, taping the interview for a show that's essentially doing the same thing as Rigby's production of "Peter Pan" -- taking it on the road hoping for a shot at the big time.Rigby now knows that after 11 months of playing places like Baltimore's Mechanic Theatre, "Peter Pan" is going to Broadway. But the Reids won't know until sometime next year if "Tim and Daphne" will make television's equivalent -- national syndication.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1998
The Bold and the Banal: Showtime manages to display both tonight.The Bold comes first, with the 10 p.m. debut of "Linc's Place," an hourlong comedy set inside a Washington bar and grill. And what sets it apart is made apparent in the course of an opening monologue from Linc's owner Russell Lincoln (Steven Williams), who bemoans how liberal whites get together to make films about African-Americans and the result is "classic films like 'Booty Call.' ""Linc's Place" is that rarest of TV commodities, a series about minorities -- in this case, African-Americans -- that treats them as people, not as demographics.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 15, 1998
PASADENA, Calif. -- One of the great things about Tim Reid as a producer is that he believes television programs should have a social mission -- and the bigger the better. His new series, "Linc's," debuting Aug. 1 on Showtime, is no exception."Personally, my goal for this show is to explode the myth that black folks are monolithic," he said during a press conference here this week."That we are all one thing -- we're all liberal Democrats, we all do this, we all do that. We're either in Princeton or prison; there's no in between."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | January 13, 1994
We all know where Archie Bunker's chair is -- in the Smithsonian.Now, CBS is going to take us back to Queens to show us who's living in Archie's old house at 704 Hauser.That's the premise of "704 Hauser," a new sitcom from Norman Lear set to debut on CBS in March, after the Olympics.The occupants of Archie's old house are Ernest and Rose Cumberbatch and their son, Thurgood Marshall Cumberbatch -- an African-American family.Ernest (John Amos) is a "blue-collar liberal and veteran of the civil rights battles of the '60s," according to Lear.
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By Harry F. Waters and Harry F. Waters,Newsweek | December 5, 1993
Michael Weithorn and Ralph Farquhar had a dream. The two television writers dreamed of creating a realistic comedy-drama series set in the most unfunny setting imaginable: riot-ravaged South-Central Los Angeles.Still, CBS bought the concept. A few months ago its programmers got their first look at "South Central," the story of a single African-American mother struggling to raise three children. First, they demanded less drama and a lot more comedy. "Make it a black 'Roseanne,' " suggested one CBS executive.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | July 8, 1992
Los Angeles -- It was not one of the bigger press conferences here on the fall TV preview tour. But it held one of those moments where hundreds of disparate facts and developments in the revolution that television is going through suddenly froze in a kind of perfect alignment and led to an inescapable conclusion: Cable TV is going to grind the networks to dust because it is really starting to reflect our cultural diversity. Cable TV is connecting with multicultural America in a way the networks seem incapable of understanding.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 14, 1991
This week's cover story on multimillionaire Reginald Lewi came about in a roundabout way. Features writer Mary Corey hadn't planned to do a profile on him, but she had heard that The Sun had been trying to get an interview for three or four years without success. Writers had been told he just wasn't talking.Mary, meanwhile, was working on a feature story about actors Tim Reid and Daphne Maxwell Reid. During the interview, Tim Reid told her that Reginald Lewis was a role model for black people and a personal hero of his. She wanted to use the quote in her story, so she called Lewis' international company, TLC Beatrice, to confirm a couple of things.
FEATURES
By Harry F. Waters and Harry F. Waters,Newsweek | December 5, 1993
Michael Weithorn and Ralph Farquhar had a dream. The two television writers dreamed of creating a realistic comedy-drama series set in the most unfunny setting imaginable: riot-ravaged South-Central Los Angeles.Still, CBS bought the concept. A few months ago its programmers got their first look at "South Central," the story of a single African-American mother struggling to raise three children. First, they demanded less drama and a lot more comedy. "Make it a black 'Roseanne,' " suggested one CBS executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | July 18, 1999
For the Woodholme Foundation's Corporate Appreciation Reception, some 100 guests gathered at the Harbor Inn Pier 5 to celebrate second chances. Not theirs, but the foundation's Second Chance program, which offers first-year college tuition, housing, book and tutoring assistance to underachieving high-school seniors in the Mid-Atlantic area. It's the foundation's belief that these students did poorly in school not for lack of ability, but because of conditions beyond their control. Among the party-goers partaking of cocktails and hors d'oeuvres for a good cause: DeWayne Wickham, the foundation's founder and board chair; Vanessa Wickham-Baker, John Mason, John White and Sharon Pinder, board members; Tim Reid, television actor; Robert Steele, general manager of the Hyatt Regency Baltimore; Marilyn Johnson, president and CEO of National Public Health Forum; and Jack Harvey, a biologist at Aberdeen Proving Ground.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
IN THE Flite Three Studios out on Cold Spring Lane, Tim Reid and Daphne Maxwell Reid talked to Cathy Rigby yesterday, taping the interview for a show that's essentially doing the same thing as Rigby's production of "Peter Pan" -- taking it on the road hoping for a shot at the big time.Rigby now knows that after 11 months of playing places like Baltimore's Mechanic Theatre, "Peter Pan" is going to Broadway. But the Reids won't know until sometime next year if "Tim and Daphne" will make television's equivalent -- national syndication.
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