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December 14, 2005
Good morning --Tim Montgomery --There are some things not even you can outrun. Question of the day Will the co-general manager arrangement work better in Boston than it did with the Orioles? Anything would be better without Angelos. Kelby Brick Catonsville It might, without Peter Angelos. Successful franchises have a general manager who is respected by the other teams in the league. He can close the deal. George L. Darley Glen Burnie Next question, Ron Artest says he wants to be traded.
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SPORTS
December 14, 2005
Good morning --Tim Montgomery --There are some things not even you can outrun. Question of the day Will the co-general manager arrangement work better in Boston than it did with the Orioles? Anything would be better without Angelos. Kelby Brick Catonsville It might, without Peter Angelos. Successful franchises have a general manager who is respected by the other teams in the league. He can close the deal. George L. Darley Glen Burnie Next question, Ron Artest says he wants to be traded.
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SPORTS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 9, 2004
Tim Montgomery, the world-record holder in the men's 100 meters, and three other U.S. runners have been accused of using performance-enhancing drugs by an anti-doping agency in a move that could lead to them being banned from this summer's Athens Olympics. The U.S. Olympic Committee said in a statement that four track athletes have been accused of violations by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. Although the USOC didn't disclose any names, Montgomery's lawyer said the sprinter was among the four and the Los Angeles Times reported on its Web site that the others were sprinters Chryste Gaines, Michelle Collins and Alvin Harrison.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2004
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Baltimore's James Carter booked his ticket to the Athens Games with a stirring, come-from-behind triumph yesterday at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials. Carter, a 1996 Mervo graduate who trains in Hampton, Va., rallied over the final two three-foot barriers to win the men's 400-meter hurdles final in 47.68 seconds, fastest time in the world this year, at the Alex G. Spanos Sports Complex. "I've been thinking about this race for the last four years, and it couldn't have worked out any better," he said.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2004
LOS ANGELES - To get to the starting line this summer in Athens, Greece, Tim Montgomery - the world-record holder in the 100-meter dash and boyfriend of track superstar Marion Jones - must answer allegations of doping that are more extensive than previously disclosed. According to documents obtained by the Times, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency alleges that Montgomery used five banned steroids as well as the blood-booster EPO, human growth hormone and insulin. USADA alleges Montgomery used banned substances as far back as 2000, two years before setting the 100-meter mark.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | June 25, 2004
NOT TO COMPLAIN, considering the image-busting travails Marion Jones, Lance Armstrong, Tim Montgomery and Barry Bonds are experiencing, but these are tough times for sportswriters and sports fans, too. Given a choice, my earth-patrolling lot of short-attention-spanned scribes would much prefer to glorify athletes, especially the most famous champions who have achieved the rarest sporting records. In sportswriting parlance, we'd rather "god up" the likes of Armstrong, Bonds, Montgomery and Jones.
SPORTS
By Alan Abrahamson and David Wharton and Alan Abrahamson and David Wharton,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 12, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Marion Jones' ex-husband, C.J. Hunter, has been in contact with U.S. anti-doping authorities and will probably cooperate with their investigation into whether Jones has used steroids, his attorney said yesterday. Hunter, a shot-putter who retired after testing positive for steroids in 2000, also has been assisting federal prosecutors in a separate case in San Francisco. Attorney Angela DeMent would not describe what Hunter has told federal officials. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, in pursuing its parallel investigation, has been keenly interested in hearing what he might know about the circumstantial evidence it has pointing to Jones.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2004
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - Baltimore's James Carter booked his ticket to the Athens Games with a stirring, come-from-behind triumph yesterday at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials. Carter, a 1996 Mervo graduate who trains in Hampton, Va., rallied over the final two three-foot barriers to win the men's 400-meter hurdles final in 47.68 seconds, fastest time in the world this year, at the Alex G. Spanos Sports Complex. "I've been thinking about this race for the last four years, and it couldn't have worked out any better," he said.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2001
EDMONTON, Alberta - Once again, Baltimore's Bernard Williams has proved himself a golden guy of American track and field. With a solid second-leg performance by Williams, the former standout at Carver High and the University of Florida, the United States dashed off with the gold medal in the men's 400-meter relay, the closing event of the track and field world championships yesterday at Commonwealth Stadium. Mickey Grimes to Williams, Williams to Dennis Mitchell, Mitchell to Tim Montgomery - the three baton passes were on the money as the United States raced off to a decisive triumph in 37.96 seconds, beating South Africa (38.47)
SPORTS
December 14, 2005
Baltimore native Bernard Williams was awarded a national title and a world silver medal yesterday, and Maurice Greene regained his U.S. 100-meter record. And they didn't have to step onto a track to do it. The actions came after Tim Montgomery was suspended two years for doping. Another U.S. sprinter, two-time Olympic relay medalist Chryste Gaines, also received a two-year ban from the Court of Arbitration for Sport in Lausanne, Switzerland. Neither runner tested positive for drugs. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency sought the bans based on evidence gathered in the criminal investigation of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | June 25, 2004
NOT TO COMPLAIN, considering the image-busting travails Marion Jones, Lance Armstrong, Tim Montgomery and Barry Bonds are experiencing, but these are tough times for sportswriters and sports fans, too. Given a choice, my earth-patrolling lot of short-attention-spanned scribes would much prefer to glorify athletes, especially the most famous champions who have achieved the rarest sporting records. In sportswriting parlance, we'd rather "god up" the likes of Armstrong, Bonds, Montgomery and Jones.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2004
LOS ANGELES - To get to the starting line this summer in Athens, Greece, Tim Montgomery - the world-record holder in the 100-meter dash and boyfriend of track superstar Marion Jones - must answer allegations of doping that are more extensive than previously disclosed. According to documents obtained by the Times, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency alleges that Montgomery used five banned steroids as well as the blood-booster EPO, human growth hormone and insulin. USADA alleges Montgomery used banned substances as far back as 2000, two years before setting the 100-meter mark.
SPORTS
By Alan Abrahamson and David Wharton and Alan Abrahamson and David Wharton,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 12, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Marion Jones' ex-husband, C.J. Hunter, has been in contact with U.S. anti-doping authorities and will probably cooperate with their investigation into whether Jones has used steroids, his attorney said yesterday. Hunter, a shot-putter who retired after testing positive for steroids in 2000, also has been assisting federal prosecutors in a separate case in San Francisco. Attorney Angela DeMent would not describe what Hunter has told federal officials. The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, in pursuing its parallel investigation, has been keenly interested in hearing what he might know about the circumstantial evidence it has pointing to Jones.
SPORTS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 9, 2004
Tim Montgomery, the world-record holder in the men's 100 meters, and three other U.S. runners have been accused of using performance-enhancing drugs by an anti-doping agency in a move that could lead to them being banned from this summer's Athens Olympics. The U.S. Olympic Committee said in a statement that four track athletes have been accused of violations by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. Although the USOC didn't disclose any names, Montgomery's lawyer said the sprinter was among the four and the Los Angeles Times reported on its Web site that the others were sprinters Chryste Gaines, Michelle Collins and Alvin Harrison.
SPORTS
By Elliott Denman and Elliott Denman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2001
EDMONTON, Alberta - Once again, Baltimore's Bernard Williams has proved himself a golden guy of American track and field. With a solid second-leg performance by Williams, the former standout at Carver High and the University of Florida, the United States dashed off with the gold medal in the men's 400-meter relay, the closing event of the track and field world championships yesterday at Commonwealth Stadium. Mickey Grimes to Williams, Williams to Dennis Mitchell, Mitchell to Tim Montgomery - the three baton passes were on the money as the United States raced off to a decisive triumph in 37.96 seconds, beating South Africa (38.47)
SPORTS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | April 25, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - Marion Jones, American track and field's biggest superstar, and Tim Montgomery, world-record holder in the 100-meter dash, received anabolic steroids from the Burlingame, Calif., nutritional lab at the center of an international doping scandal, government investigators were told. Victor Conte, owner of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, told investigators that the two Olympic athletes had received banned performance-enhancing substances in exchange for endorsements of a nutritional supplement he marketed, The Chronicle learned.
SPORTS
January 3, 2008
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. -- Former Olympic champion sprinter Marion Jones said she has been punished enough and should not have to go to prison for lying about steroids and check fraud. In court papers filed Monday, Jones' attorneys asked a federal judge to give her probation when he sentences her next week. "She has been cast from American hero to national disgrace," the memo said. "The public scorn, from a nation that once adored her, and her fall from grace have been severe punishments." Jones admitted in court in October that she lied to federal investigators.
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