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By NEWSDAY | February 21, 2006
"We designed the characters five years before we got the actors. So it just weirdly happened that they looked alike." Tim Burton on the casting of the voices in the Oscar-nomi nated The Corpse Bride.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
If hearing there's a Tim Burton exhibit at New York's Museum of Modern Art conjures up visions of a bunch of movie stills, costumes and assorted props — well, you're probably going to be disappointed by the show that wraps up its five-month stay in the Big Apple on April 26. But you'll probably be the only one who's disappointed. While plenty of pieces will call to mind movies like "Edward Scissorhands," "Batman" and "Alice In Wonderland," plenty have nothing to do with what's been shown on screen during Burton's 25 years as a feature-film director.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 22, 1993
He remembers. The evil king scatters the teeth of the hydra in the ground, and intones the magic curse. The clouds gather, lightning strikes, the music rises, and one by one they emerge . . . the children of the hydra. A phalanx of skeletons with shields and broadswords, they advance on their quarry."It was the first movie I ever saw," says Tim Burton, creator of "Beetlejuice," the two "Batman" movies and "Edward Scissorhands," "and it was so . . . primal."The movie was Ray Harryhausen's 1963 classic of stop-motion animation, "Jason and the Argonauts," perhaps the pinnacle of the technique that combined meticulously animated and photographed puppets matted into a scene with live-action actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kenneth Turan and Tribune newspapers | March 5, 2010
One pill makes you larger and one pill makes you small, and the pills Tim Burton gives you don't do very much at all. With apologies to the Jefferson Airplane's "White Rabbit," that more or less sums up "Alice in Wonderland," the director's middling new version of the Lewis Carroll tale. It has its successful moments but it's surprisingly inert overall, more like a Burton derivative than something he actually did himself. Through no fault of its own, "Alice" also has the misfortune of being the first major 3-D release to come out after the "Avatar" revolution, and when you add in that Burton chose to shoot in 2D and have the footage converted, it inevitably plays like one of the last gasps of the old-fashioned ways of doing things.
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By Jim Emerson and Jim Emerson,Orange County Register | June 26, 1992
Though hardly an underground filmmaker, Tim Burton has a style that could well be described as subterranean -- and not just because he makes movies in the Batcave. Mr. Burton might be the world's most successful practitioner of a new form of filmmaking: latent cinema.Although on the surface, at the level of narrative, Mr. Burton's movies are often vague and amorphous, underneath they're stuffed with all sorts of intriguing themes, patterns, metaphors, associations.The Burbank, Calif.-born director of "Pee-wee's Big Adventure," "Beetlejuice," "Edward Scissorhands" and two "Batman" films is the first to agree with the consensus that he doesn't know how to tell a story.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 19, 1999
Blood flows prodigiously, spurts spontaneously and puddles luxuriously in "Sleepy Hollow," Tim Burton's very loose adaptation of the Washington Irving story, "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." As usual, Burton has his finger right on the pulse of audiences looking for frightening flights of fancy, creating a wonderfully atmospheric world that is gloomily enchanted with murderous spirits, vengeful ghosts and supernatural dervishes of destruction.Which makes it all the more disappointing when Burton -- who, after all, brought us the first two "Batman" movies as well as the morbidly visionary "Edward Scissorhands" -- nudges the entire enterprise over the top with googly-eyed skeletons, a megaplex-friendly action sequence set in a windmill and way, way too many rolling-head shots.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 27, 2001
The original Planet of the Apes (1968), like the source novel by Pierre Boulle, was a scintillating mix of sci-fi adventure and allegory that spawned four big-screen follow-ups, a live-action TV series and a Saturday morning cartoon show. Younger kids loved the talking apes on the mystery planet who lorded it over pathetic humans. College kids loved what they and Charlton Heston's astronaut antihero said, which replayed the slogans of the Vietnam- and civil-rights-era in simian drag. The new Planet of the Apes will do tremendous business and spawn at least one sequel from people who will demand to know what, if anything, it means.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 29, 2001
NEW YORK -- Tim Burton became Hollywood's uncrowned master of quirk (masters of quirk don't wear crowns) with his back-to-back hits, Pee-Wee's Big Adventure and Beetlejuice. And with Batman he demonstrated that he could use his own bent vision to put across the odd shadows in a mainstream myth. He isn't even predictably unpredictable. He'll go from the insanely slovenly Mars Attacks! to the visually elegant Sleepy Hollow and now on to Planet of the Apes, a mixed bag of cosmic proportions.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1996
Jack Nicholson as the president of the United States. Jack Nicholson as a Las Vegas hustler. Little green men who say "ack-ack," leer at Playboy centerfolds and turn the entire U.S. Congress to toast. Tom Jones as Tom Jones. Disembodied heads falling in love with each other. Songs by Slim Whitman."Mars Attacks!" has it all, and more. How could this movie not be a riot?Ask Tim Burton, who somehow has managed the impossible. Never has a movie so brimming with potential failed so utterly to deliver.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 27, 1991
Here's my advice: Drop "Fred." It's dead.A murky slapstick of the id, "Drop Dead Fred" is a lame spinoff of "Beetlejuice," done on a 10th the budget with a 20th the wit. It features Rik Mayall -- a zany British comedian who appeared on "The Young Ones" on MTV -- as an emblem of Phoebe Cates' imagination. His mission: to teach her self-esteem while breaking every plate in Minneapolis.Mayall, who resembles that other irritating horror from the land of failed movies, Yahoo Serious, is the title character, an elf from the unconscious who, by one of cinema's dimmest strokes, only Cates can see. This produces endless sequences where Fred acts up in restaurants or museums and Cates starts screaming hysterically at him, only to reveal herself as completely insane to the onlookers.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | February 21, 2006
"We designed the characters five years before we got the actors. So it just weirdly happened that they looked alike." Tim Burton on the casting of the voices in the Oscar-nomi nated The Corpse Bride.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 29, 2001
NEW YORK -- Tim Burton became Hollywood's uncrowned master of quirk (masters of quirk don't wear crowns) with his back-to-back hits, Pee-Wee's Big Adventure and Beetlejuice. And with Batman he demonstrated that he could use his own bent vision to put across the odd shadows in a mainstream myth. He isn't even predictably unpredictable. He'll go from the insanely slovenly Mars Attacks! to the visually elegant Sleepy Hollow and now on to Planet of the Apes, a mixed bag of cosmic proportions.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 27, 2001
The original Planet of the Apes (1968), like the source novel by Pierre Boulle, was a scintillating mix of sci-fi adventure and allegory that spawned four big-screen follow-ups, a live-action TV series and a Saturday morning cartoon show. Younger kids loved the talking apes on the mystery planet who lorded it over pathetic humans. College kids loved what they and Charlton Heston's astronaut antihero said, which replayed the slogans of the Vietnam- and civil-rights-era in simian drag. The new Planet of the Apes will do tremendous business and spawn at least one sequel from people who will demand to know what, if anything, it means.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2000
If movie director Tim Burton ("Edward Scissorhands," the darkest of the "Batman" movies and "Ed Wood") had turned his eccentric talents to interior design rather than filmmaking, Paloma's would have been the result. After your eyes adjust to the scenery here, you may wonder why you played it safe and painted your whole house beige. Paloma's has a traditional bar and a dining area, but most of its several rooms have been laid out for lounging. There are long couches, deep chairs and lamps covered with glittering scarves.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 19, 1999
Blood flows prodigiously, spurts spontaneously and puddles luxuriously in "Sleepy Hollow," Tim Burton's very loose adaptation of the Washington Irving story, "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." As usual, Burton has his finger right on the pulse of audiences looking for frightening flights of fancy, creating a wonderfully atmospheric world that is gloomily enchanted with murderous spirits, vengeful ghosts and supernatural dervishes of destruction.Which makes it all the more disappointing when Burton -- who, after all, brought us the first two "Batman" movies as well as the morbidly visionary "Edward Scissorhands" -- nudges the entire enterprise over the top with googly-eyed skeletons, a megaplex-friendly action sequence set in a windmill and way, way too many rolling-head shots.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1996
Jack Nicholson as the president of the United States. Jack Nicholson as a Las Vegas hustler. Little green men who say "ack-ack," leer at Playboy centerfolds and turn the entire U.S. Congress to toast. Tom Jones as Tom Jones. Disembodied heads falling in love with each other. Songs by Slim Whitman."Mars Attacks!" has it all, and more. How could this movie not be a riot?Ask Tim Burton, who somehow has managed the impossible. Never has a movie so brimming with potential failed so utterly to deliver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kenneth Turan and Tribune newspapers | March 5, 2010
One pill makes you larger and one pill makes you small, and the pills Tim Burton gives you don't do very much at all. With apologies to the Jefferson Airplane's "White Rabbit," that more or less sums up "Alice in Wonderland," the director's middling new version of the Lewis Carroll tale. It has its successful moments but it's surprisingly inert overall, more like a Burton derivative than something he actually did himself. Through no fault of its own, "Alice" also has the misfortune of being the first major 3-D release to come out after the "Avatar" revolution, and when you add in that Burton chose to shoot in 2D and have the footage converted, it inevitably plays like one of the last gasps of the old-fashioned ways of doing things.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Richardson and Cameron Barry and David Richardson and Cameron Barry,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2000
If movie director Tim Burton ("Edward Scissorhands," the darkest of the "Batman" movies and "Ed Wood") had turned his eccentric talents to interior design rather than filmmaking, Paloma's would have been the result. After your eyes adjust to the scenery here, you may wonder why you played it safe and painted your whole house beige. Paloma's has a traditional bar and a dining area, but most of its several rooms have been laid out for lounging. There are long couches, deep chairs and lamps covered with glittering scarves.
FEATURES
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1994
Los Angeles -- Forget the buzz and speculation about Martin Landau's amazing portrayal of Bela Lugosi in Tim Burton's eccentric film "Ed Wood." Here's the inside skinny -- Mr. Landau will win the Best Supporting Actor Oscar.How do we know? After a lunch of Chinese garlic shrimp, Mr. Landau opens a fortune cookie to behold this promise: "You will receive some high praise or award." "This is hilarious -- I've never gotten one like this before," he says with a laugh -- then he carefully tucks the fortune into his wallet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | July 29, 1994
Black is the color of Caroline Thompson's true love's hair: black as in mane and coat, black as in horse, black as in "Black Beauty." A first-time director and longtime rider, Thompson brings to her film nothing so much as a pure and unadulterated passion for horseflesh.But it's a particular kind of passion. It's not men's passion, it doesn't need to dominate and own and control. It doesn't see horses as useful, as mighty athletes or awesome load bearers or handsome steeds that reflect so winningly on their master.
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