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By Susan King and Susan King,Los Angeles Times | July 2, 1993
Richard Karn seems like a regular Joe munching a hamburger with all the works at the patio commissary at Disney Studios during a rehearsal break from ABC's "Home Improvement."In fact, he's not too far removed from Al Borland, the character he plays on the enormously popular Tim Allen sitcom. Al is the stoic, bearded, flannel-shirted assistant of fumbling Tim Taylor (Mr. Allen) on "Tool Time," the show-within-a-show on "Home Improvement." After watching him for two seasons on the Top Five series, which airs at 9 p.m. Wednesdays on ABC, (WJZ, Channel 13)
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By ROGER MOORE and ROGER MOORE,ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 10, 2006
Tim Allen was born to play a dog. He's been practicing since before he became a TV star - the growling, the panting, the crotch fixation. Disney's remake of The Shaggy Dog uses Allen to great effect in a comedy about a workaholic dad who has to be bitten by a magical dog and become canine to find out the truth about his family and the real villains in a trial he is in the middle of. The Shaggy Dog (Walt Disney Pictures) Starring Tim Allen, Robert Downey Jr., Kristin Davis, Danny Glover.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1997
Tinseltown has tentative plans to close Westminster's East Main Street on May 5 for the shooting of a Universal Studios film starring Tim Allen.The movie crews also plan to be in town May 6 and 7 to work on the film, "For Richer or Poorer," a present-day comedy about a New York City man in Amish country.Filming dates are tentative -- dependent upon the weather, officials cautioned. The moviemakers apparently are trying to avoid publicity to discourage crowds.Westminster will be standing in for Pennsylvania's Lancaster County -- complete with horses and buggies.
FEATURES
December 15, 2005
When St. Nick falls off a roof, a nonbeliever (Tim Allen, above) becomes the next big man in The Santa Clause (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2).
ENTERTAINMENT
By Phil Kloer and Phil Kloer,Cox News Service | June 14, 1991
Comedian Tim Allen, the fool for power tools, can't get excited about his new TV show.It's "like trying to tickle yourself," he says. "It's just taken so long to unfold."Mr. Allen, 37, is being groomed as the next stand-up comic to make the transition to TV sitcom stardom, following Bill Cosby, Roseanne Barr and Jerry Seinfeld. His sitcom "Home Improvements," in which he plays a character he describes as "Bob Vila on steroids," debuts this fall on ABC at 8:30 p.m. Tuesdays as a lead-in to "Roseanne."
BUSINESS
By Rachel Sams and Rachel Sams,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 17, 1999
They are Imre & Associates; hear them roar. Or rather, "RRR.""RRR" is a sound familiar to fans of the Tim Allen show "Home Improvement" -- it's Allen's battle cry, the primal scream of a guy who loves his tools. What those same fans may not know is that Allen started his own line of tools, Tim Allen Signature Tools, in 1996.Imre & Associates LLC, a 6-year-old Towson public relations firm, has been hired to get that message out to tool lovers across the country."Part of our job is to show people these are serious tools," said Dave Imre, president of Imre & Associates.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
The horse and buggy will jostle the automobile off Main Street for three days of movie filming, as Universal Studios Inc. and star Tim Allen transform downtown Westminster into Pennsylvania Dutch country.The change should occur next month if the weather cooperates, location manager George W. Spicer told city officials and downtown merchants yesterday."The star of the show is a very popular man right now called Tim Allen who's coming off a couple of very big hits, so we expect this to be a very big hit," Spicer said.
NEWS
May 7, 1997
SO YOU WANT TO BE in pictures? Well, first, you've got to change your name.The outside of The Sun's bureau in Westminster is going to make it to the silver screen, albeit with a "stage name."The Winchester Exchange was renamed the Lancaster Exchange with a movie storefront sign this week as the Tim Allen comedy began shooting scenes along East Main Street. Other businesses also got new signs; a few had extensive interior redesigns for indoor shots.The block was closed off for filming, allowing the easy passage of horses and buggies that are an integral part of the Amish culture represented in the film.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 1, 2002
The Santa Clause 2 is corny and sappy and cliched and trite and brims with forced holiday enthusiasm. At some point, you'll fall under its spell. A sequel to the 1997 film that starred Tim Allen as a harried dad whom fate and a magic suit turn into Santa Claus, the movie struggles too hard to replicate the earlier formula; plenty of times, you'll wish director Michael Lembeck had eased up on the throttle. But every time the forced cuteness and relentless ho-ho-ho-ness threaten to overwhelm, Allen engages in light-hearted tomfoolery or Lemback and his team of five (!
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 4, 1997
Westminster police will barricade Main Street early tomorrow, as filming begins in the city's downtown business district for the Tim Allen and Kirstie Alley movie "For Richer or Poorer."Allen and Alley, successful movie and television actors, are expected in town -- as are crowds of fans, despite Universal Studios' efforts to downplay the filming.A block of East Main Street, from Railroad Avenue to Longwell Avenue, is to be closed from 5: 30 a.m. until at least 7 p.m., said Police Chief Sam R. Leppo.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 10, 2004
OF LIFE'S PERSISTENT problems - death, taxes and dripping faucets - the last is one you can do something about. All three got my attention this week. I heard a lot of discussion about death, or more precisely deliverance from it, as the religious observances of Passover and Easter unfolded. I was also reminded that income taxes are due Thursday. And I read reports out of Annapolis saying that our elected representatives, who are paid with our tax dollars to do a job, seem to be doing nothing, not even munching free meatballs.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 1, 2002
The Santa Clause 2 is corny and sappy and cliched and trite and brims with forced holiday enthusiasm. At some point, you'll fall under its spell. A sequel to the 1997 film that starred Tim Allen as a harried dad whom fate and a magic suit turn into Santa Claus, the movie struggles too hard to replicate the earlier formula; plenty of times, you'll wish director Michael Lembeck had eased up on the throttle. But every time the forced cuteness and relentless ho-ho-ho-ness threaten to overwhelm, Allen engages in light-hearted tomfoolery or Lemback and his team of five (!
FEATURES
By Phil Kloer and Phil Kloer,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 2002
Asked why his new Christmas movie, The Santa Clause 2, is opening the day after Halloween, Tim Allen takes the question like a man. And starts counting on his fingers. "Honestly? It's six words," he quickly decides. "Harry-Potter-Lord-of-the-Rings." "We were going to come out at Thanksgiving, which is when the last one did," he continues. But then Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets staked out Nov. 15 as its opening date, and The Two Towers, the second installment of Lord of the Rings, parked its bulk on Dec. 18, and Walt Disney Pictures suddenly decided it'd better move their Christmas movie earlier to keep from getting creamed.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 21, 2001
Joe Somebody is a by the-numbers, innocuous little film that may be just what family audiences need. That's hardly meant as high praise. Still, there's something to be said for a movie the entire family can attend without fear of negativity or crudity, a film that suggests there's a right way and a wrong way to react, a film that emphasizes being yourself over trying to be who others want you to be. Tim Allen stars as Joe Scheffer, a video technician whose...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Claudia Eller and Claudia Eller,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | October 31, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- Celebrity voice-overs have become a central part of the animation business, changing the ways studios today promote and market their family movies.Not only did Tom Hanks and Tim Allen receive "over scale" salaries for reprising their roles in "Toy Story 2," they're also the first stars to get their names above the title in all print advertising for the coming Thanksgiving release from Walt Disney Pictures and Pixar Animation Studios."There's no denying that when you have Tom Hanks and Tim Allen, two of the big stars around, it's a huge plus for us," said Richard Cook, chairman of Walt Disney Motion Pictures Group.
BUSINESS
By Rachel Sams and Rachel Sams,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 17, 1999
They are Imre & Associates; hear them roar. Or rather, "RRR.""RRR" is a sound familiar to fans of the Tim Allen show "Home Improvement" -- it's Allen's battle cry, the primal scream of a guy who loves his tools. What those same fans may not know is that Allen started his own line of tools, Tim Allen Signature Tools, in 1996.Imre & Associates LLC, a 6-year-old Towson public relations firm, has been hired to get that message out to tool lovers across the country."Part of our job is to show people these are serious tools," said Dave Imre, president of Imre & Associates.
FEATURES
By Phil Kloer and Phil Kloer,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 31, 2002
Asked why his new Christmas movie, The Santa Clause 2, is opening the day after Halloween, Tim Allen takes the question like a man. And starts counting on his fingers. "Honestly? It's six words," he quickly decides. "Harry-Potter-Lord-of-the-Rings." "We were going to come out at Thanksgiving, which is when the last one did," he continues. But then Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets staked out Nov. 15 as its opening date, and The Two Towers, the second installment of Lord of the Rings, parked its bulk on Dec. 18, and Walt Disney Pictures suddenly decided it'd better move their Christmas movie earlier to keep from getting creamed.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and By Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 21, 2001
Joe Somebody is a by the-numbers, innocuous little film that may be just what family audiences need. That's hardly meant as high praise. Still, there's something to be said for a movie the entire family can attend without fear of negativity or crudity, a film that suggests there's a right way and a wrong way to react, a film that emphasizes being yourself over trying to be who others want you to be. Tim Allen stars as Joe Scheffer, a video technician whose...
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 25, 1999
Jill has a great job offer in Indiana, and Tim is leaving his cable show, "Tool Time," over what the TV industry likes to call "philosophical differences." Will the Taylors really leave their home in Detroit and Wilson and Al and all their other friends?That's the premise of tonight's 90-minute series finale, as "Home Improvement" signs off after eight years near the top of the Nielsen ratings with one of the most successful runs in sitcom history. As flimsy as the finale seems at times -- Tim (Tim Allen)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1999
Eight seasons was plenty for ABC's "Home Improvement," says series co-star Patricia Richardson."I think it's absolutely the time" to stop, said Richardson, who plays Tim Allen's wife on the popular sitcom, which ends its run Tuesday on WMAR, Channel 2. "I always had a really hard time the last couple of years knowing where to take the characters. The hardest thing about a sitcom or a long-running series is that the characters can't really grow very much, because if they do, there's no show, you lose conflict."
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